Navistar And Volkswagen Plan Medium Duty Electric Truck By 2019

 

This story about an electric truck from Volkswagen and Navistar was first published by CleanTechnica

The commercial trucking company Navistar International and Volkswagen AG’s Truck and Bus will be jointly launching a medium-duty electric truck in the North American market by late 2019, company execs have revealed. The two firms will be jointly developing hardware and systems that will be used by both of them — this includes “connectivity” systems to keep trucks connected to the internet and each other.

Navistar electric truck

Andreas Renschler

The two companies will also be collaborating on the development of the next generation of “Big Bore” diesel powertrains, Volkswagen Truck CEO Andreas Renschler and Navistar CEO Troy Clarke revealed in an interview with Reuters. All of this news of course follows on Volkswagen’s relatively recent acquisition of a 16.6% stake in Navistar.

Reuters provides more: “Commercial truck makers are investing in electrification as regulators and policy makers have stepped up pressure to curtail or eliminate pollution from diesel engines in big cities. … The new electric truck for North America will be a Class 6 or 7 truck based on a Navistar vehicle, and aimed at urban delivery customers.

“Volkswagen will test nine electric trucks in Austria that will offer payloads of about 18 tons and ranges of about 180 kilometers between charges, Renschler said. Rival Daimler AG said last week delivered the first of a smaller range of electric delivery trucks to customers in New York.”

The plan is apparently for this Volkswagen + Navistar collaboration to provide the two companies with a solution if some cities start banning diesel trucks due to concerns about air pollution. How likely is that in the next few years? Actually, quite likely, with municipalities like Mexico City, Paris, Madrid, and Athens all saying they have active plans to ban diesel powered vehicles by the year 2025.

In general, converting inner cities to electric trucks and buses is seen as more important that getting people out of cars with internal combustion engines and into EVs.





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's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.