Stuffing the Frunk of a Tesla Model S (w/Video)

The Tesla Model S has many advantages. It has great acceleration. It has no tailpipe emissions… because there is no tailpipe. It is quieter and requires less maintenance than a car with an internal combustion engines. It also has a big hole at the front where the engine used to be. That means it has more room to carry stuff in the front trunk, which Tesla owners call a frunk.

How much stuff, exactly? That’s precisely the question EV enthusiast and frequent YouTube contributor EVangelist (gotta love that name!) set out to answer recently. Equipped with a tape measure and several common items, he takes us inside the frunk to show us exactly what fits and what doesn’t.

First off, the space measures 38 inches wide by 13 ½ inches deep. Not huge, but enough to carry a few items. It is about 15 inches high at the back and 9 inches high in the front. Because the hood is aluminum, you probably don’t want to be slamming it shut. Soft-sided luggage and bags are definitely the way to go here.

A small carry-on bag fits perfectly. The larger carry-on bags that most of us drag along on vacation will fit lengthwise and widthwise, but may be too tall for the hood to close. Bungee cords and Teslas definitely don’t go together. A couple of shopping bags filled with groceries will fit, as will a standard-size cardboard box like the kind copier paper comes in.

One thing EVangelist makes clear is the correct way to close the hood. You don’t just drop it from a great height like you did on your mom’s Pontiac after you got done checking the oil. The proper technique is to lower the hood, then place your palms on either side of the latch and give it a firm push. You really don’t want to slam it or put any dimples in it.

Actually, this video pertains to dual-motor Model S cars only. Older models with a single motor at the rear have a larger frunk, one that is large enough for a sheep, if you’re into things like that. But having all-wheel drive is a lot better than ovines in your frunk any day.

 

 

Steve Hanley

Closely following the transition from internal combustion to electricity. Whether it's cars, trucks, ships, or airplanes, sustainability is the key. Please follow me on Google + and Twitter.