Browsing the "Advanced Batteries" Category

LG Chem Plant Finally Making American Batteries For Chevy Volt

August 7th, 2013 | by Christopher DeMorro

More than two years ago, Korean tech company LG Chem opened a battery plant in Holland, Michigan, with a deal to produce batteries for the Chevy Volt. But slow sales have meant not enough work for the plant, which finally went online this month. The first Volts sporting American-made LG chem batteries will hit streets sometime this fall


Researchers Create Wooden Battery For Large-Scale Energy Storage

July 2nd, 2013 | by Nicholas Brown

Very few things would be more helpful to the transition to clean energy, all-natural, low-cost battery that lasts a long time. So imagine how world-changing a battery made from wood fibers could be to the clean energy movement. A team of scientists at the University of Maryland, including Liangbing Hu, and Teng Li, have done just that, creating a battery made of wood fibers and tin, two of the cheapest and most-common elements in the world


Nissan Launching Leaf Battery Replacement Program

June 24th, 2013 | by Nicholas Brown

Nissan will offer a unique battery replacement program for U.S. customers in 2014, under which you pay them a monthly amount for a guarantee that your battery pack will be replaced if your battery's capacity falls below 9 bars, or 70% of what it originally had


Sulfur-ion Batteries to be Cheaper, More Energy Dense

June 23rd, 2013 | by Jo Borras

A new type of battery that both lithium and sulfur ions is currently being developed at the DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and it promises to outwit, outplay, and outlast the best batteries currently on the market, for a fraction of the cost. How big of a boost does sulfur give “conventional” lithium-ions? The lab’s researchers are reporting that their sulfur ion batteries have approximately four times the energy density of the lithium-ion batteries currently found in electric cars like the Nissan Leaf and Tesla Model


Fiskers Claims Against A123 Systems Cut By 89%

April 10th, 2013 | by Nicholas Brown

Fisker Automotive made claims of $140 million against A123 Systems (now called B456 Systems. They moved onto the next letter in the alphabet and used the three numbers after 123) because of the rejection of its supply agreement and alleged breach of warranty obligations. The claims were $91.2 million for damages caused by rejection of its supply agreement, and $48.7 million for a breach of warranty obligations. But most of these claims were rejected



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