New Diesel Emission Policies Kill 2017 Mercedes-Benz C300d

 

2017 Mercedes-Benz C300d

The multi-billion dollar Volkswagen “dieselgate” scandal surrounding the brand’s cheating on US emissions tests continues to generate fallout. The latest victim? That would be the 2017 Mercedes-Benz C300d. And that’s not the only Mercedes model to be hit by changes in the way the EPA certifies vehicles.

For Mercedes-Benz, delays caused by new EPA policies could force a number of changes to the automaker’s US lineup. The C-Class, GLC, GLE, and GLS diesel models have all been pushed back for 2017- and it’s not clear if they’ll be back for 2018, either.

“Numerous authorities are currently testing diesel engine vehicles for compliance with emission standards,” Mercedes-Benz USA spokesman Robert Moran wrote in an email. “Of course, this process has a considerable impact on new diesel certification projects both in terms of effort and duration.” As such, the automaker claims it is now only seeking approval for the GLS350d. Which, it should be noted, has already been delayed once before.

For those of you keeping score, then, that means Volkswagen’s diesels are out. Audi’s diesels are out. Mercedes’ diesels are, apparently, on the way out now, too. As it stands, Jaguar is the only automaker ready to sell 2017 model year diesels in the US. Sure, BMW and GM (nee Chevy) are both anticipating their diesels to be cleared for sale before the end of the year. But that still just leaves Jaguar in the here and now. One brand, compared with nine brands offering twenty diesel models in the US this time last year

Nice job, VW.

What do you guys think? Is this an example of EPA regulations run amok, or is it finally time to admit that the testing procedures are- and have always been- fundamentally flawed? Let us know what you think in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

 

Source | Images: Automotive News, via the Truth About Cars.





About the Author

I've been in the auto industry 1997, and write for a number of blogs in the IM network. You can also find me on Twitter, at my Volvo fansite, or chasing my kids around Oak Park, IL.
  • Rick Danger

    Yes.It’s finally time to admit that the testing procedures are- and have always been- fundamentally flawed. It’s time for diesel to die, Die, DIE!

  • Ed

    There has always been a fundamental issue with Diesel technology: high peak combustion temperatures create NOX. Many engineers in the industry questioned how VW was able to meet requirements. Now, we know the answer: they could not.
    We may ultimately decide – after sorting out the different means by which all other Diesel producers cheat – that the Diesel must go. Even the Diesels using urea injection to reduce emissions may ultimately be withdrawn. Remember, while urea injection does indeed reduce NOX, it does so by introducing a new ingredient into the exhaust stream, one that is simply not on the list of measured pollutants. If an ammonia emission limit is imposed, would urea injection be allowed?
    In my view, the Diesel will soon be killed in passenger cars.

  • Good riddance to the lie of the “clean diesel.”