Tesla Model X Saves Family From Runaway GMC Yukon

Jonathan Braman was driving with his family in a Tesla Model X this last week when it was plowed into by a clueless clod piloting a gargantuan GMC Yukon. The SUV ran a red light (can you say “distracted driving,” boys and girls?”) and sheared off most of the Tesla’s right front corner before coming to a stop.

Model X saves lives in MInnesota

“I rapidly got out of the car and was lucky enough to have a group of young men who were behind me in line at the light help extract us from the car. I quickly got my family as far away from the GMC as I could. I was unsure if the gasoline in that car was stable and worried that his car would catch fire.” He adds, “We are alive. I’m pretty sure any other 7 passenger vehicle would have rolled if hit by this distracted Detroit Missile.”

The collision revealed some of the lesser known safety features of the Model X, like leg airbags. Basically, the interior of the car converts itself into a really big pillow in the event of a collision.  “The other car was forced to glance off of us and came to a stop. The crumple zones worked, and my father who was sitting several inches from the point of impact was seen and discharged from the hospital. He would have been much more seriously injured if there were less safety protections. The leg airbags (and the others as well) deployed, protecting him even further.”

Braman is an orthopedic surgeon who is all too familiar with neck and spinal cord injuries caused by auto accidents. He fully appreciates what might have happened to him or his family if the Model X spun around or rolled over.

He bought a Tesla Roadster in 2010 and was one of the first to put down a deposit on the Model X in 2012. After waiting 4 years for his second Tesla, he says, “I waited 4 years for this one and would wait 4 more if that is what it took to protect my family like this.” Elon Musk says the Model X may be the safest car ever built. Jonathan Braman would agree.

Source: Teslarati  Photo credit: Jonathan Braman

 

Steve Hanley

Closely following the transition from internal combustion to electricity. Whether it's cars, trucks, ships, or airplanes, sustainability is the key. Please follow me on Google + and Twitter.