2016 Cadillac ELR Drops Price, Adds Performance

2016-cadillac-elr-003-1

A few days ago I reported that the Cadillac ELR would not be replaced after its product cycle ran out…and just how long that product cycle was is anybody’s guess, because GM wasn’t talking. That led to Cadillac CEO John de NYsschen commenting on our post, saying that the ELR wasn’t dead, and that a host of improvements were right around the corner. Turns out, the guy was telling the truth, and the 2016 Cadillac ELR is in every way a better value, from price to performance.

There’s a long list of enhancements for the 2016 Cadillac ELR, and perhaps the most meaningful change is a steep drop in price. Cadillac quotes the 2016 ELR as costing $58,499 after the $7,500 Federal tax rebate, putting its MSRP right around $65,999. That’s about $10,000 less than the 2014 ELR, though with incentives took as much as $20,000 off the $76,000 original MSRP. Considering the ELR was looking rather dead after a new version missed its debut at the LA Auto Show, this is a surprise move from GM.

It’s rare that an automaker will lower a car’s price and add new features, but that’s exactly what Johan did with the 2016 ELR. A 25% increase in power knocks 1.5 seconds off the 0 to 60 MPH time, bringing it from a Volt-like 7.9 seconds down to 6.4 seconds, a much more respectable rating for a car costing $60,000. Electric driving range still comes in at just 39 miles, but Cadillac has stiffened the suspension, tweaked the steering, and improved the feel of the regenerative braking system. The Driver Assistance suite of safety features like blind spot alert and rear cross traffic warning systems are now standard, though adaptive cruise control remains an option.

Want more? You can have it with the optional Performance Package that adds 20-inch wheels wrapped in summer rubber, front Brembo four-piston brake calipers a sport steering wheel and a retuned Continuous Damping Control and suspension system. Pretty much everything I wanted in the ELR, it now has, and all at a much more reasonable price. One feature missing, even as an option, is the Supercruise self-driving feature that supposedly delayed the new ELR in the first place. Wonder what happened there?

Regardless of all that, I was wrong, and I can see why Johan took the time to respond to my original post. Perhaps he is exactly the CEO Cadillac needs right now, because he took a royal screw-up by GM and made it into the car it should have been from the get-go.

 

Christopher DeMorro

A writer and gearhead who loves all things automotive, from hybrids to HEMIs, can be found wrenching or writing- or else, he's running, because he's one of those crazy people who gets enjoyment from running insane distances.