High Speed Rail cali-hsr

Published on October 14th, 2013 | by Andrew Meggison

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Poll Finds That 52% of Californians Want High-Speed Rail Stopped

cali-hsrThe California high-speed rail project has been called too expensive and too slow by critics, and it seem the average person is starting to agree. A poll conducted by USC Dornsife and the Los Angeles Times has found that 52% of Californians want to call it quits on the California High Speed Rail Project.

The California High Speed Rail Project is a $68-billion project to link Los Angeles and San Francisco by trains traveling up to 220 mph. Progress has been slow from the get go, and so far the project is one year behind schedule, has been met with a series of lawsuits, and the cost of the project keeps rising.

Sen. Quentin Kopp, who served for years on the California High-Speed Rail Authority board, has said that the agency will need another bond measure to complete construction. That means voters could potentially weigh in on whether or not to allow the bond, and that means the same voters who once supported the high speed rail project could kill it.

The poll consisted of a sampling of 1,500 registered voters in California. Conducted in mid-September, the poll did find some differences in voter opinion about the project across the state. Most significantly in the liberal Bay Area 51% were in support of the project, while in the  Central Valley 59% of respondents oppose the continuation of the project.

The California High Speed Rail Project is a good project; in fact it is arguably a necessary project that is way overdue here in one of the richest and most developed nations in the world. That being said it is very easy and valid to argue against a project that could end up costing twice as much as predicted. With Elon Musk’s proposed hyperloop gaining some much-needed money and brainpower, it could end up as a real alternative to high-speed rail in California.

Should California kill its high-speed rail project and start from scratch?

Source: latimes.com

Andrew Meggison was born in the state of Maine and educated in Massachusetts. Andrew earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Government and International Relations from Clark University and a Master’s Degree in Political Science from Northeastern University. Being an Eagle Scout, Andrew has a passion for all things environmental. In his free time Andrew enjoys writing, exploring the great outdoors, a good film, and a creative cocktail. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @AndrewMeggison 


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About the Author

Andrew Meggison was born in the state of Maine and educated in Massachusetts. Andrew earned a Bachelor's Degree in Government and International Relations from Clark University and a Master's Degree in Political Science from Northeastern University. In his free time Andrew enjoys writing, exploring the great outdoors, a good film, and a creative cocktail. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @AndrewMeggison



  • UncleB

    Better to buy a system that already has a proven track record, from Europe, Asia China? American engineering just doesn’t measure up any more? American schools producing dummies? All the way to the Moon and back and you still can’t design a competitive car, railway, or electric bullet train? China’s electric bullet trains , 320 Kilometres per hour , 24/7, for over a decade now!

    • T Adkins

      We could do with a proven train from another land, and it is also true the the US public education system from those under 18 has more in common lately with prison camps and daycare centers working on state indoctrination than a giving a real education to the young. But persons from all over the globe still come to the US for our higher education establishments.

      Many of the CEO’s and politicians do come from a 50′s and 60′s era mind set, so we do drag our feet to offer railways or bullet trains that up until recently no many in the US wanted or even cared about. Competitive car that older era ceo and politician, we taxed and tariff imported cars so they would be less cost competitive, then they just made and sold those same car on US soil for the same price but were no longer taxed on the imports. US gas prices have been some of the lowest in the world, really for some in the US if your cost per gallon was under $1 and your over $50,000 V10 got about 10mpg it didnt bother them at all. In the US we still pay under $4 per gallon just under $1 per liter in most places. Many places EU countries pay more than double what we do and have been for some time.

      US car companies can design and make competitive cars and they do for sage outside of the US we just keep kicking around a mostly-false-narrative to slow the uptake of those kinds of cars here in the US.

      • UncleB

        You describe ‘inertia” and ‘resistance to change” and a sorrowful and extravagant waste of a perishable commodity – the human commodity! All the while huge loans from China sell out America to afford this folly? not a formula for a successful nation? Can America do better?

  • http://MrEnergyCzar.com/ MrEnergyCzar

    Build Hyperloop instead…

  • Pingback: Gas 2 | What is the future of fuel? What's new? What's next? Since 2007, Gas 2 has covered a rapidly changing world coming to terms with its oil addiction.

  • Pingback: Gas 2 | What is the future of fuel? What’s new? What’s next? Since 2007, Gas 2 has covered a rapidly changing world coming to terms with its oil addiction. | Enjeux énergies

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