Auto industry Tesla Roadster

Published on July 16th, 2013 | by Jo Borras

5

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last? We Have an Answer …

Tesla Roadster

How long do electric car batteries last? It’s a common enough question, and one that really hasn’t had an answer … until recently, that is. Plug In America did a survey of several owners of Tesla’s Roadster, the precursor to Tesla’s hot-selling Model S sedan – and, arguably, the first successful modern electric car – and found that the cars’ batteries maintained 80-85% of their original capacity after 100,000 miles.

85% after 100,000 miles. That’s significantly better than even Tesla’s claims, which promised Roadster buyers that they’d retain 70% of their battery capacity after 5 years and 50,000 miles. It’s also worth noting that, in practice, mileage seems to be the only variable that impacted the Tesla’s retained battery capacity. Hot or cold climate variations don’t seem to play a role, neither does the type of driving (range vs. standard mode, for example).

SO, while there still isn’t a direct answer to the “How long do electric car batteries last?” question, at least we can now say “Well over 100,000 miles without a huge drop in performance and range.” and back it up with real-world data.

You can check out the full Plug In America report, below, or click here for the PDF version of Plug In America’s Tesla Roadster Battery Study. Enjoy!

 

How Many Miles Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Many Miles Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Many Miles Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Many Miles Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Many Miles Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Many Miles Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last

How Long Do Electric Car Batteries Last

 

Source: Plug In America, Inside EVs.


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About the Author

I've been involved in motorsports and tuning since 1997, and write for a number of blogs in the Important Media network. You can find me on Twitter, Skype (jo.borras) or Google+.



  • Wallace

    Very good info. The battery should be good for 200,000 miles at that rate. I would love to see a study like that on the Chevy Volt. From my own observation, Volts with 75,000 miles and 2.5 years old show no sign of any degradation yet. Although the Volt battery is smaller than the Tesla battery, GM has more aggressive battery management, only using 65% of the battery instead of 80-90%. So my guess is 200,000 miles is not a problem for the Volt battery either.

  • Nick Cannon

    Keeps getting better

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  • mike

    This is great news if you happen to own a Tesla but most people buying EVs are getting the Leaf which has NO thermal management system thus one would expect to see a greater failure rate with the cheaper battery. How about a write-up for the Leaf and the Volt?

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