Electric Vehicles no image

Published on May 17th, 2013 | by Nicholas Brown

5

Aftermarket Industry Rolls Out First EV Accessories

AJPN PHOTOThe automobile industry has a long history rich with aftermarket accessories, replacement parts, and modified parts to enhance drivers’ experiences. It is about time that the electric vehicle industry got that as well, and the first of these EV-specific accessories is hitting the aftermarket now.

One of the more popular accessories is an EVSE charging cord upgrade that facilitates 240 volt charging of the Nissan Leaf, Toyota Prius PHEV, MItsubishi i-MiEV, Chevrolet Volt, Honda Fit EV, and other J1772-compatible electric vehicles.

This upgrade will enable the Nissan Leaf to charge in four hours using a 240 volt, 30 amp outlet, rather than 7 to 8 hours. Upgrades are done by sending your vehicle’s existing charging cord in to EVSEupgrade.com, they will upgrade it, and return it to you. They will also sell you the entire charger outright so you can keep the original cord. That one is 20 amps (4,800 watts).

Another accessory is the Clipper Creek LCS-25, pictured above. It is a wall-mountable charger which is also portable enough to be carried in the car. This allows you to turn any 240 volt outlet into an EV charging station.

eco-hitch

For the Tesla Model S, there is the EcoHitch, which is a trailer hitch design specifically for the Model S. It provides a 2 inch or 1.25 inch receiver which does not require drilling. It is made from recycled materials, and is recommended for hitch-mounted bike racks, but not heavy-duty hauling, as the Tesla Model S is not a pickup.

This first wave of EV accessories shows how versatile the automotive aftermarket can be, and this is only the beginning. Give the market a decade to mature, and you’ll have all sorts of accessories and upgrades available to cars like the Tesla Model S and Nissan Leaf.

The future looks bright indeed.

Source: Plugincars.com

Visit my website, Kompulsa-GE


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,


About the Author

writes on CleanTechnica, Gas2, Kleef&Co, and Green Building Elements. He has a keen interest in physics-intensive topics such as electricity generation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology, energy storage, and geography. His website is: Kompulsa.com.



Back to Top ↑