Auto industry model-s-road

Published on March 11th, 2013 | by Andrew Meggison

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Could EVs Bring Style Back To Cars?

model-s-roadA story on Bloomberg.com recently ran showcasing the decline of style in conventional cars. While the style from 1950s and 1960s is long gone, the article does point out that the electric and hybrid car industry could bring that lost character back to consumers.

Today most cars are massed produced and for the most part they all look alike. Yes, you can get different options and styles, but that does not really change the basic model of the car – a sedan is still going to look like a sedan. This lack of radical style is absolutely fine for most people. New cars today are very aerodynamic, safe, and reliable; plus it’s a shape that people recognize and are comfortable with.

Hyundai’s once cutting-edge design is slowly being replicated (with mixed results) by other automakers. That’s not to say every car looks the same; there are plenty of cars that break the mold. But styling isn’t as important as it used to be; fuel economy, safety, and reputation seem to matter more.

Meanwhile the electric car and hybrid car markets are slowly breaking into the mainstream with consumers. Manufacturers know this and they want to attract drivers – and one of the easiest ways to do this is to make a car that turns heads.

The article specifically singles out Tesla Model S and Fisker Fisker Karma as two electric/hybrid car manufactures that are leading the way for style. While it is true that these cars do have a lot of style, the Model S starts at $52,700 after tax credits, and the Fisker Karma at around $100,000. For that kind of money the car better turn heads.

But with other automakers copying each other when it comes to styling, could electric cars bring a styling revolution to a world of “me too clones”?

Sound off in the comments section below, are EVs bring style back to the automotive world?

Source: Bloomberg.com

Andrew Meggison was born in the state of Maine and educated in Massachusetts. Andrew earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Government and International Relations from Clark University and a Master’s Degree in Political Science from Northeastern University. Being an Eagle Scout, Andrew has a passion for all things environmental. In his free time Andrew enjoys writing, exploring the great outdoors, a good film, and a creative cocktail. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @AndrewMeggison 


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About the Author

Andrew Meggison was born in the state of Maine and educated in Massachusetts. Andrew earned a Bachelor's Degree in Government and International Relations from Clark University and a Master's Degree in Political Science from Northeastern University. In his free time Andrew enjoys writing, exploring the great outdoors, a good film, and a creative cocktail. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @AndrewMeggison



  • Jason Carpp

    Except perhaps for the Tesla, which I think is a good looking car overall, I don’t believe so. I’ve seen the Nissan Leaf, and I thought the car was ugly as crud! That being said, if someone wanted to build a car and ask people around the country how they feel about the car’s styling, asking people for suggestions, they might be able to build a car that might please most people.

  • Jo Borras

    I think packaging hardware drives design requirements. As the hardware changes, the package that needs to carry it (chassis, sheet metal, etc. ) will change. New will appeal to many just for the sake of its newness, no?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Bruce-Miller/100000952005408 Bruce Miller

    Annual model changes for the sake of sales churning? Planned obsolescence
    for the sake of sales churning? Never again! The Global Village cannot afford
    this massive environmental abuse ever again. Better educated folk see cars as utilitarian,
    are fully aware of lifetime durability of three moving part electric drives and
    will soon enough be appraised of the super-longevity of the new nanocarbon
    super-capacitors and D.C. pulsed drive systems. The notions from the American Automotive
    Age, of new models annually and a need to replace cars before payment schedules
    were done will never happen again on this planet. Within the Global Village,
    and especially from less exploitative systems as found in China, change will
    come with scientific and technological advances. The astounding amount of Steel
    and Iron mined; formed, and smelted to keep up the “American illusion” of
    annually “new and improved” cars must never happen again in all
    history. Even Cuba still runs cars made in the early 1950′s in America, and
    current Asian designs give very much higher value, go a very much longer way
    for a dollar invested, than anything Americans had. Perhaps in America once
    again, sales appeal will overcome common sense, honest engineering, practicality, and
    arrogance and pride will rule with greed, avarice, status will be affordable, but facing
    the current wage structures, and wealth distributions, union busting government
    activities and the high cost of medical insurance, housing and drugs for the
    peons, annual model changes for only a very few at the very top this time around?

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