Electric Vehicles audi-a2

Published on January 8th, 2013 | by Nicholas Brown

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Audi A2 Hybrid And EV Cancelled

For unstated reasons, production of the plug-in hybrid and all-electric Audi A2 vehicles has been canceled. This is just another reflection of an uncertain market for electric vehicles, both in the U.S. and abroad.

Production of the Audi A2 was originally scheduled to begin in 2015, and these vehicles were to be equipped with aluminum spaceframes, and a “sandwich floor” design in which the lithium-ion battery bank was to be stored. The Mercedes Benz A-Class has a similar floor design.

Audi said it would provide 125 miles of range via a four-hour charge, and 114 bhp (brake horsepower) electric motor powering the front wheels.

One possible reason for this may be the inaccurately forecasted electric vehicle demand for 2012 and beyond. Nissan Leaf sales were far less than expected, and consumers don’t seem to have much confidence in pure EVs. By the end of 2012, only 9,819 Nissan Leaf vehicles were sold.

All is not lost, though. Audi is likely waiting for a less risky time to produce electric cars, and they will eventually. Rumor has it that the pure electric Audi R8 e-Tron is also back on track, albeit for a limited production run.

The electric vehicle industry is still in its early stages, and this means that this is one of those times of frequent failures, and even disasters, as all the automakers go through the essential process of trial and error. The Audi A2 was a good idea, but it was probably cancelled for a good reason. Besides, nothing says Audi can’t bring this idea back from the dead one day in the near future.

Source: Autocar.co.uk


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About the Author

writes on CleanTechnica, Gas2, Kleef&Co, and Green Building Elements. He has a keen interest in physics-intensive topics such as electricity generation, refrigeration and air conditioning technology, energy storage, and geography. His website is: Kompulsa.com.



  • Marc P.

    Pure EV’s time has not come, at least not as a mass market product. Why not just concentrate on better and better PHEV. Eventually, cost of batteries will go down and technology advancements will provide more and more range.

    I live close to my job and stores, so give me 20 to 40 miles of pure electric range on a reasonably priced hybrid and I’ll cut my annual fuel consumption by at least 60%… if not 80%.

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