Bicycles axalko-wooden-bicycle-537x401

Published on June 4th, 2012 | by Andrew Meggison

11

It Is Not Only Green But A Work Of Art

Without question, a traditional pedal bicycle is the greenest vehicle on the road today. Some bikes are getting an even more sustainable treatment, being built from materials such as bambooAxalko Bikes has created a very unique bike made out of wood shavings.

If you saw this wooden bike pass you by on a city street, odds are you would not think it was made out of wood. The Axalko Bat bike frame is hand made out of lightweight, sturdy, tubular fibers of wood and a micro-laminated finish.

The wooden frame weighs between 1.4 and 2.3 kg (about 3 – 7 lbs) depending on the frame size. Thanks to a polyurethane varnish, the bike is highly water resistant – on par with carbon fiber frames, claims Axalko.

Axalko mainly uses ash tree wood for the core of the frame; however, many different type woods can be selected for an exterior lamination, making these bikes highly customizable. Speaking customizing, since the wooden frames are not that different from non-wooden high-end bike frames, they are compatible with a number of components from aftermarket companies.

This unique, handmade, wooden bike can be yours for around 6,000 Euros – that is about $7,396 USD at current exchange rates.

Source: treehugger.com

Andrew Meggison was born in the state of Maine and educated in Massachusetts. Andrew earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Government and International Relations from Clark University and a Master’s Degree in Political Science from Northeastern University. Being an Eagle Scout, Andrew has a passion for all things environmental. In his free time Andrew enjoys writing, exploring the great outdoors, a good film, and a creative cocktail. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @AndrewMeggison


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About the Author

Andrew Meggison was born in the state of Maine and educated in Massachusetts. Andrew earned a Bachelor's Degree in Government and International Relations from Clark University and a Master's Degree in Political Science from Northeastern University. In his free time Andrew enjoys writing, exploring the great outdoors, a good film, and a creative cocktail. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @AndrewMeggison



  • http://www.honorflightwyoming.org Honor Flight Wyoming

    anyone trying to talk smack about this be quiet. You know why… because this bike is a PIMPMOBILE!

  • http://www.jumpstartgreen.org JumpStartGreen

    This bike looks like it is worth trying it out. Anyone ride it yet??

  • Andrey Petrov

    A traditional pedal bicycle is MOST DEFINITELY NOT the greenest vehicle on the road today. An electric bicycle is at least an order of magnitude greener. Consider the emissions per w/h for electricity generation in your country/state. Then consider the emissions per food calorie. If you take into account the emissions for the manufacturing of the electric bicycle kit (you’ll also have to take into account the emissions for manufacturing and maintaining the food industry infrastructure), then the difference is even greater.
    Cycling is better than driving a fossil fuel car and good for your health too :-)
    But as far as the environment is concerned, electric cycling is to cycling what cycling is to driving!

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/joborras/ Jo Borras

      That’s a bizarre statement, man. Disagree 100%.

      • Andrey Petrov

        It’s counter intuitive, I know, and my initial reaction was the same :-)
        There are some good resources on the subject on the Net though!

  • http://CEC fletch

    factoring in embodied energy means you must include waste. Human waste(bio) vs electric/batt waste(hazmat or toxic by-products)……where do we stand?

    • Andrey Petrov

      The food industry consumes a lot of electric energy too, so fossil fuels aside, don’t think you’re burning less electricity when travelling on muscle power :-)
      It really depends on a ton of factors, e.g. more meat in your diet or not eating locally produced food means more fossil fuels and electricity (think processing, refrigeration, cooking, etc) are burned to get that food to your table.

  • vetcl

    Where on gawd’s green Earth would anyone want to ride an 8 K (after taxes and setup) bicycle????? (Quickly stolen for components with a hammer. No pro bike thieves? Yes, there are.)
    Forget that, who can realistically afford the expense, aside from a one-percenter?

    Any time gas 2 would like to disseminate news people can use, will be just fine by me.

    PS: My accountant says I can’t afford to buy any more art right now.

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/joborras/ Jo Borras

      You must be new here (planet Earth). $8K is pretty reasonable for a high-end bike, and sales of such bikes have been trending upwards since 2008 (understandable, since – despite the recession – people still want nice things, and a $9K bicycle is easier to justify to your accountant than a $90K car).

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