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Published on April 27th, 2012 | by Andrew Meggison

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Hydrogen By Hyundai Coming in 2013

Out of all of the auto makers Hyundai is getting the jump on the coming hydrogen fuel cell powered car game. The hydrogen-powered Hyundai Tucson ix will launch in 2013.

Hyundai, a Korean auto maker, is not the only car company to be adding hydrogen powered vehicles to its consumer retail fleet. Toyota, Honda, and GM are all planning their hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCEVs) to launch in 2015. However, Hyundai will be the first to test the market, with 1,000 units actually going on sale next year.

The price tag of the hydrogen Tucson ix will be $88,550. Undoubtedly a steep price, and with the leaps and bounds in electronic vehicle (EV) technology causing lower prices for EVs, hydrogen may have missed the market. Also, if you don’t live near one of the handful of pilot hydrogen filling stations, you are SOL my friend.

Yet for all the naysayers of hydrogen — the fuel cells are expensive and hydrogen fill up stations are not very common–  the fact remains that large amounts of major car manufactures are pursuing the technology. Hyundai has not given details about where the first 1,000 hydrogen FCEVs will ship, but it is most likely that the majority will be sent to Europe.

Unlike in the U.S., hydrogen is a major emerging player in Europe, with FCEVs going beyond cars to include buses and other heavy vehicles. There are a few pilot programs in the U.S., mostly in California and New York, but hydrogen has a much more devout following in Europe.

Hyundai has definitely come a long way from the scrappy car maker they were just a decade ago. But can they become a major player in the hydrogen fuel economy? That remains to be seen. If any of the Hyundai FCEVs do come to America, they are likely to release in limited numbers in the Los Angeles area where many HFCV prototype,s including the Honda FCX Clarity, have been tested.

What are your thoughts on HFCV? Sound off below.

Source: leftlanenews.com

Andrew Meggison was born in the state of Maine and educated in Massachusetts. Andrew earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Government and International Relations from Clark University and a Master’s Degree in Political Science from Northeastern University. Being an Eagle Scout, Andrew has a passion for all things environmental. In his free time Andrew enjoys writing, exploring the great outdoors, a good film, and a creative cocktail. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @AndrewMeggison

 



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About the Author

Andrew Meggison was born in the state of Maine and educated in Massachusetts. Andrew earned a Bachelor's Degree in Government and International Relations from Clark University and a Master's Degree in Political Science from Northeastern University. In his free time Andrew enjoys writing, exploring the great outdoors, a good film, and a creative cocktail. You can follow Andrew on Twitter @AndrewMeggison



  • Jeff

    What is it with the unrealistic dogma that favors electric and hybrid vehicles over hydrogen? I don’t understand how anyone in their right mind can even think that battery powered vehicles will ever be anything more than a niche player and a minor niche player at that. There simply isn’t enough of a supply of rare earth metals to supply the numbers of batteries that would be required for millions of automobiles.

    Hydrogen is so mind boggling in its sheer abundance that it makes an ideal energy source. Light weight and non-polluting with only the emission of water from a tail pipe. Granted, producing the hydrogen from the oceans is a bit more challenging, but only needs a supply of electricity. The electricity is easily produced from the sun, but producing solar cells is a bit costly. However, solar cells are made from silicon, another extremely abundant element found in the earth’s crust. The answer is so simple, it’s absolutely maddening that most people think the horribly complicated Prius drivetrain is the way of the future.

    Posco has developed the most efficient process of extracting lithium from seawater of any manufacturer. Yet Hyundai, which is one of the pioneers of using lithium batteries in its hybrid vehicles, is absolutely sold on hydrogen. It’s very easy to see why. The sooner the rest of the industry and North America sees it, the sooner we can make real progress in green technologies and not over-simplified gimmicks such as the use of NiMH battery powered motors assisting an internal combustion engine burning gasoline.

    Hydrogen powered fuel cells are expensive for certain, but hydrogen can easily be used to power up conventional internal combustion engines. To say that hydrogen has missed the market is an incredibly naive statement at best and horribly ignorant at worst. The future of propulsion will be hydrogen based. It’s really only a matter of when.

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/joborras/ Jo Borras

      I’ve never seen an ICE effectively run on hydrogen. I call raging BS on your entire premise here.

    • http://yahoo t

      Jeff, Very interesting comments. Have you ever looked at the Hydrogen converter? I believe Presley company held the patent rights.

  • Tirnaog

    Then look up the BMW Hydrogen ICE car. & series i believe.
    They had that working fine.

    • http://importantmedia.org/members/joborras/ Jo Borras

      I did – 100 “concept” vehicles that aren’t exactly being rushed into production. They’re PR stunts, not solutions.

  • john

    build hydrogen fuel stations now in the usa ,the hydrogen car will sell itself immediatley. [the future is now]

  • john

    building hydrogen fuel stations in the usa should be easy[ if the usa really wants to] copenhagen denmark , manufactures,installs on site, and is fueling hydrogen cars in [48hrs] we should be able to do the same thing.

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