Activism 500x_fish_kill_02

Published on September 16th, 2010 | by Jo Borrás

8

Not a Road: is BP to Blame for This Massive Fish Kill?

What seems to be a serene country road (above) is actually a massive Gulf fish kill.  Fish kills are common along the Gulf of Mexico, where dead zones pop up almost every year – but these fish kills have typically been limited to a single species of fish.  What you see above, however, is a broad die-off of dozens of species, including – if a local Louisiana news station is correct – a whale.

This is the surface of a Louisiana waterway, covered with hundreds of thousands of dead fish, crabs, eels and stingrays… even a dead whale.  The scope of this huge dead zone in the gulf is raising alarms with Louisiana governmental officials like Billy Nungesser, who distributed the photos above to local media this morning.

Nungesser believes the die-off may be related to the BP oil disaster this summer, but some scientists fear we’ll see more dead zones like this as an influx of oxygen-consuming, oil-eating microbes (often used as part of a chemical dispersement to consume water-borne oil particles) enter the gulf.

For the record:  there is no proof (yet) that the BP oil spill is to blame for this particular fish kill, but no matter what the cause, it’s Grade-A nightmare fuel – and I, for one, can’t think of a more ringing endorsement for alternative fuels than photos like these.

SOURCE:  Yahoo, via Jalopnik.


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About the Author

I've been involved in motorsports and tuning since 1997, and write for a number of blogs in the Important Media network. You can find me on Twitter, Skype (jo.borras) or Google+.



  • http://themoralskeptic.blogspot.com/ Themoralskeptic

    I have no idea how someone notes that it is usually limited to one fish species, as the dead zones in Chesapeake Bay oven claim any number of different creatures. For instance here is a journal article http://www.bayjournal.com/article.cfm?article=3405 stating as much and there are many others that can be found with little effort.

    The BP-Spill may at most made the dead zones a little worse, but there is nothing beyond idol speculation to show that. The real problem is that dead zones themselves that have been growing every year and are connected with agricultural run-off and not oil spills (see http://technorati.com/lifestyle/green/article/what-is-causing-ocean-life-to1/ ).

    “And I, for one, can’t think of a more ringing endorsement for alternative fuels than photos like these.” What? Fuels didn’t cause this the article you cite even says this, the real problem of agricultural run off is being twisted into an argument for new fuels. I mean even look at the update on the article you wrote about, “UPDATE: The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries investigated the fish kill and determined that it was the result of low oxygen levels caused by low tides and high temperatures.”

    Those pictures have NOTHING to do with needing new fuels and your quote should say, “And I for one can’t think of a more ringing endorsement for better farming methods.”

    Thank you,

    -the moral skeptic

  • http://themoralskeptic.blogspot.com/ Themoralskeptic

    I have no idea how someone notes that it is usually limited to one fish species, as the dead zones in Chesapeake Bay oven claim any number of different creatures. For instance here is a journal article http://www.bayjournal.com/article.cfm?article=3405 stating as much and there are many others that can be found with little effort.

    The BP-Spill may at most made the dead zones a little worse, but there is nothing beyond idol speculation to show that. The real problem is that dead zones themselves that have been growing every year and are connected with agricultural run-off and not oil spills (see http://technorati.com/lifestyle/green/article/what-is-causing-ocean-life-to1/ ).

    “And I, for one, can’t think of a more ringing endorsement for alternative fuels than photos like these.” What? Fuels didn’t cause this the article you cite even says this, the real problem of agricultural run off is being twisted into an argument for new fuels. I mean even look at the update on the article you wrote about, “UPDATE: The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries investigated the fish kill and determined that it was the result of low oxygen levels caused by low tides and high temperatures.”

    Those pictures have NOTHING to do with needing new fuels and your quote should say, “And I for one can’t think of a more ringing endorsement for better farming methods.”

    Thank you,

    -the moral skeptic

  • http://themoralskeptic.blogspot.com/ Themoralskeptic

    I have no idea how someone notes that it is usually limited to one fish species, as the dead zones in Chesapeake Bay oven claim any number of different creatures. For instance here is a journal article http://www.bayjournal.com/article.cfm?article=3405 stating as much and there are many others that can be found with little effort.

    The BP-Spill may at most made the dead zones a little worse, but there is nothing beyond idol speculation to show that. The real problem is that dead zones themselves that have been growing every year and are connected with agricultural run-off and not oil spills (see http://technorati.com/lifestyle/green/article/what-is-causing-ocean-life-to1/ ).

    “And I, for one, can’t think of a more ringing endorsement for alternative fuels than photos like these.” What? Fuels didn’t cause this the article you cite even says this, the real problem of agricultural run off is being twisted into an argument for new fuels. I mean even look at the update on the article you wrote about, “UPDATE: The Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries investigated the fish kill and determined that it was the result of low oxygen levels caused by low tides and high temperatures.”

    Those pictures have NOTHING to do with needing new fuels and your quote should say, “And I for one can’t think of a more ringing endorsement for better farming methods.”

    Thank you,

    -the moral skeptic

  • http://themoralskeptic.blogspot.com/ The moralskeptic

    Read the update on your own source. It says that BP had nothing to do with the dead zone.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_upshot/20100914/od_yblog_upshot/massive-fish-kill-reported-in-louisiana

  • http://themoralskeptic.blogspot.com/ themoralskeptic

    “For the record: there is no proof (yet) that the BP oil spill is to blame for this particular fish kill, but no matter what the cause, it’s Grade-A nightmare fuel – and I, for one, can’t think of a more ringing endorsement for alternative fuels than photos like these.”

    For the record alternative fuels would cause more of this to happen because many of them are derived from agricultural products. It is in fact the opposite of an endorsement for alternative fuels, because (as your source notes) dead zones are created by agricultural run-off. It anything it should change some people’s minds about farming methods.

  • Butuan787

    You can still eat this fish.

  • http://Web terrance

    The frenzied quest for alternative fuels probably had more to do with this than BP did. Those corn-based biofuels require enormous amounts of fertilizers to be viable. The runoff from those midwestern farms ends up by way of the Mississippi river in the gulf of Mexico, where they feed the algae that starves the fish. Its called “the dead zone” and its been a known and growing phenomenon for years.
    Also, BP, having re-branded itself as “beyond petroleum” had been spending billions of dollars on academic and political programs and propaganda to endear itself to the current gang of enviro-leftist idiots running things these days. Greatest recipient of BP political donations was BarryO himself. Hence they needed to save a million here and there by cutting corners on drilling safety, secure in the knowledge that they had been granted special dispensation. Result: the deepwater-horizon catastrophe

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