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Published on May 28th, 2010 | by Nick Chambers

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Navistar Will Sell Electric 2-Ton Commercial Truck in Oregon First

Earlier this month Navistar announced it had begun production of the first Class 2c-3, 2-ton, medium-duty commercial electric truck in the U.S. — the eStar. It’s also the same vehicle that FedEx has announced it will be testing for fleet use in LA this year.

Now Navistar says that the first market the eStar will be commercially available is in “one of the nation’s most environmentally sustainable cities and a leading advocate for energy-efficient transportation,” Portland, Oregon.

The eStar is the first medium-duty commercial vehicle to receive EPA certification as a clean fuel fleet vehicle as well as California Air Resources Board certification as a zero-emissions vehicle. It has a range of 100 miles, an 80 kWh battery pack, can carry up to 4,400 pounds and has a gross vehicle weight rating of 12,100 pounds. For use in an urban or semi-urban environment, a 100 mile range on a 2-ton delivery truck is pretty much all you’d need for an 8 hour day.

“Freight and service trucks present the biggest opportunity for real and significant reductions in carbon emissions and pollution, especially in the urban environment,” said Portland Mayor Sam Adams in a statement. “Because of all Portland is doing to be a more sustainable and prosperous city and encourage the electric vehicle industry, I’m proud that Navistar chose Portland as its initial launch city for the eStar purpose-built, all-electric truck.”

Along with the initial launch market announcement, Navistar also said that its exclusive eStar dealer for the Pacific Northwest market is going to be Cascadia International Trucks in Tacoma, Washington. Cascadia will provide all sales, service and parts needs for eStar customers in the region.

Source: Navistar



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Not your traditional car guy.



  • yuval Brandstetter MD

    An 80KWH battery is a 40K dollar investment.

    Why would anyone make such an upfront investment unless incentivized by the pwoers-that-be?

    Why invest in a battery that will degrade to 70-65 KWH in 2-3 years? Why buy a leaking oil-well upfront?

    If the MODEC design allows for a quick battery swap, why not take up the Better Place architecture as demonstrated in Tokyo right from the start?

  • yuval Brandstetter MD

    An 80KWH battery is a 40K dollar investment.

    Why would anyone make such an upfront investment unless incentivized by the pwoers-that-be?

    Why invest in a battery that will degrade to 70-65 KWH in 2-3 years? Why buy a leaking oil-well upfront?

    If the MODEC design allows for a quick battery swap, why not take up the Better Place architecture as demonstrated in Tokyo right from the start?

  • Nick

    I’m a contractor in Southern California ,I have three truck on road and an spending roughly $1500.00 a month on gas (plumbing contractor) on each truck. I like the idea of electric utility truck but 100 miles will at times get me in trouble ,what do I do if I am working out of area or have long day . Also I put in a lot of miles and am concerned after year two if battery will be up to par. How much power will I have once truck is loaded with weight.
    Currently as follows:
    2013 silverado 2500 $28,000.00
    Miles travel per year 20000
    Gas spent per year $4000
    After 5 years investment $28000 + $20000 equals $ 48000
    I currently have a 2005 silverado with about 250000 miles on it and it still runs great
    I know I spend a lot on gas but am looking at hard numbers, is it financially a better move towards electric ,since I’m not a tree hugger.

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