Electric Vehicles Axial Flux Electric Motor May Not Take You Back to the Future, But How’s 0-60 in Under 3 Seconds?

Published on March 24th, 2010 | by Nick Chambers

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Axial Flux Electric Motor May Not Take You Back to the Future, But How’s 0-60 in Under 3 Seconds?

This ain’t yo daddy’s Flux Capacitor. A “stealthy” (read: “completely unheard of” — stealthy would imply actively trying to stay under the radar) itty-bitty start-up company from down under has come up with an in-wheel electric motor that might just make electric cars the outright kings of speed.

The “Axial Flux 3-Phase AC Induction Wheel Motor,” as Evans Electric calls it, not only has an important sounding name, its inventors are coming up with some pretty ballsy claims that cars equipped with them could get from 0-60 mph in under 3 seconds. That’s the kind of acceleration that could, quite literally, rip your eyeballs from their all-important perch in front of your brain.

I tried to find it, but there is almost no other information available besides the video below and the one source article… so take this one with a grain of salt. Reportedly, each Axial Flux motor produces about 95 horsepower (70 kW). With 4 of them on a car that’s nearly 400 HP… 400 HP plus the instant, high torque of an electric motor? Sounds like a winning combination.

The idea of in-wheel motors is certainly not new. About a year and a half ago, I brought you information about a wheel created by Michelin that not only has the motor in the wheel, but the suspension too. As I said at the time, “When you’ve eliminated the need for an engine, a transmission, a drive shaft, a differential, an exhaust system, shock absorbers and a suspension system within the chassis of the car, not only can you start to imagine entirely different car shapes, you can have both front and rear “trunk” storage, have a lot more room for people in the cabin, and create new safety features to boot.”

Clearly in-wheel motors (and suspension) have a lot going for them. The EVN report claims that Evans Electric will be unveiling an actual car using the Axial Flux motors on all 4 wheels within the next month and that the car will be a “well proven model with a long history of World Rally Championship success.” Apparently the car will also be supplied with 400 volts of A123 lithium-ion nanophosphate battery packs.

Check out the video below for a look at the Axial Flux motor during testing.

Source: Electric Vehicle News (via AutoblogGreen)




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  • ChuckL

    Nice story Nick, but your exaggeration about the eye balls only gets a slight chuckle from those of us who have ridden “liter bikes” since the mid 1980s.

  • ChuckL

    Nice story Nick, but your exaggeration about the eye balls only gets a slight chuckle from those of us who have ridden “liter bikes” since the mid 1980s.

  • Atlas

    This axial flux wheel motor resembles another design developed by the CSIRO [Australian National Scientific agency] for solar car racing.

    One of the first Australian teams to use the CSIRO version was the Aurora vehicle association from Victoria, with their entry winning the 1999 race. Accordingly as I have some experience with the WSC, I may be able to contact the members of the CSIRO group, to determine whether this product is a derivation of the original design or not.

    Thus upon completing some additional enquiries on the matter, I shall report back to your writer with the final outcome. In stating same, it is also possible that Evans Electric have come up with their own entirely independent version of the CSIRO wheel motor, although the website does not clarify, nor cite any reference to same.

  • Atlas

    This axial flux wheel motor resembles another design developed by the CSIRO [Australian National Scientific agency] for solar car racing.

    One of the first Australian teams to use the CSIRO version was the Aurora vehicle association from Victoria, with their entry winning the 1999 race. Accordingly as I have some experience with the WSC, I may be able to contact the members of the CSIRO group, to determine whether this product is a derivation of the original design or not.

    Thus upon completing some additional enquiries on the matter, I shall report back to your writer with the final outcome. In stating same, it is also possible that Evans Electric have come up with their own entirely independent version of the CSIRO wheel motor, although the website does not clarify, nor cite any reference to same.

  • Ed

    This is very similar to Kinetic Art & Technology and their segmented motor. Not much new…just a different business.

    The challenge with an electric motor being wheel-mounted are vibration and shock associated with rough roads. Motors can be better isolated when mounted in the chassis.

  • Ed

    This is very similar to Kinetic Art & Technology and their segmented motor. Not much new…just a different business.

    The challenge with an electric motor being wheel-mounted are vibration and shock associated with rough roads. Motors can be better isolated when mounted in the chassis.

  • http://Web Dwane dibley

    Hi,
    I am not sure about Paul Evans’ claims. To get 400 HP at 415 volts is going to take a mighty lot of amps. I make it approximately 240 amps per phase! An awful lot of battery power! Now if he was able to ramp up the voltage to say 5000 volts his amperage would be about 20 amps per phase. Same power but less heat wear on the coils.

    I am also not sure what why he uses the term axial flux. His alleged design is supposed to be based upon Linear Motor techniques, which in reality requires substantial pulsing techniques to achieve the desired effects.

    Another point I do not understand is why someone would want to have a 400HP EV? Is it ego or a cry for help “I can beat the pants off a Ferrari – which is about 4 secs 0 to 100 k’s”? Or is it an attempt to say my technology is supreme?

    Lets face it, most people would be happy to have an EV that comfortably potters along keeps up with the traffic and has a bit of class. Not everyone is obsessed with speed. Or pissing contests. This proves nothing as we see that it seems probable that his Angel Funding might have petered out. He might be able to turn a rotor but he is likely to do serious damage his magnets on the rotor with the braking required at 400HP. His claims need a lot of further development to become established and openly discussed. Also whatever happened to the patent Paul was going to register?

    For those interested, I would direct you to the patents on one E V Gray. who also proposed a unique EV back in the 70’s. There does seem to be some similarities here!

    Regards

  • http://Web aram

    hello
    can you help me
    i want information about axial flux motor thans

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