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Published on September 15th, 2009 | by Nick Chambers

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Audi e-tron: 313 HP, 3,319 lb-ft of torque, 0-62 in 4.8 s, 154 mile range

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Yesterday we brought you news of the impending debut of Audi’s e-tron concept at the Frankfurt Auto Show. Today Audi released more details on the the eco-luxe electric car, and it’s a monster. The car has four electric motors which, together, produce an impressive 313 HP coupled with a jaw-dropping 3,319.03 lb-ft of torque (!!).

To give you an idea of how much torque that is: the not-yet-released, 6.7-liter, turbocharged, 400 HP, Ford Power Stroke Diesel truck engine only produces a wimpy (by comparison) 725 lb-ft. And the “world’s strongest truck” (according to Volvo) — the 700 HP Volvo FH16 semi — produces merely 2,323 lb-ft of torque. The Audi e-tron produces a full thousand more lb-ft of torque than the “world’s strongest” semi truck.

In addition to these mind-boggling stats, the e-tron can reportedly go from 0-62 mph in 4.8 seconds and has a lithium-ion battery with 42.4 kWh of capacity. According to Audi, 42.4 kWh is enough to take the e-tron 154 miles. What that probably means is you’ll get 154 miles if you drive it like your 80-year-old grandmother. I’m just wildly guessing here, but I bet if you pushed the car flat out at its full performance level it might last for 20 minutes of driving.

The e-tron has a number of innovative engineering additions:

  • It can dynamically distribute its huge amount of torque at will to whatever wheels can take it, which, according to Audi “allows for dazzling dynamics and an undreamed-of level of agility and precision when cornering.”
  • A heat pump is used to efficiently warm up and heat the interior
  • The drive system, power electronics and battery are controlled by Audi’s own water-cooled thermal management system. Apparently, this system is key to achieving the car’s 154 mile range while maintaining the standards of a luxury car owner.

Likely, this concept will never see the production line, but we can dream can’t we?

In a related bit of news, Audi today announced that it will be hiring an additional 100 engineers to work on its “ePerformance” initiative. Those 100 new engineers will be set to work finding innovative solutions to make electric and hybrid cars a reality for Audi.

Read the full press release for the e-tron (long) on the next page.

Source and Image Credits: Audi




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Not your traditional car guy.



  • Adam

    Wow! One wonders why with that amount of torque the 0-60 times aren’t more in the 3 second range.

  • Adam

    Wow! One wonders why with that amount of torque the 0-60 times aren’t more in the 3 second range.

  • Bob Wallace

    “What that probably means is you’ll get 154 miles if you drive it like your 80-year-old grandmother. I’m just wildly guessing here, but I bet if you pushed the car flat out at its full performance level it might last for 20 minutes of driving.”

    Here’s Tesla’s speed/range curve. 225 miles at 60 MPH. Dropping to about 100 miles at 110 MPH.

    http://www.greencarreports.com/image/100179459_tesla-roadster-range-versus-speed

  • Bob Wallace

    “What that probably means is you’ll get 154 miles if you drive it like your 80-year-old grandmother. I’m just wildly guessing here, but I bet if you pushed the car flat out at its full performance level it might last for 20 minutes of driving.”

    Here’s Tesla’s speed/range curve. 225 miles at 60 MPH. Dropping to about 100 miles at 110 MPH.

    http://www.greencarreports.com/image/100179459_tesla-roadster-range-versus-speed

  • Roy

    Don’t get so wrapped up in this torque thing. The Audi has in-wheel motors so the torque is measured at the wheel. The normal gas/desiel ICE engines run through a transmission so the torque at the wheels is the engine rating times the transmission ratio times the differential ratio. You got to compare apples to apples.

  • Roy

    Don’t get so wrapped up in this torque thing. The Audi has in-wheel motors so the torque is measured at the wheel. The normal gas/desiel ICE engines run through a transmission so the torque at the wheels is the engine rating times the transmission ratio times the differential ratio. You got to compare apples to apples.

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