Electric Vehicles Student-Built Electric Car Charges In 10 Minutes

Published on July 27th, 2009 | by Jerry James Stone

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Student-Built Electric Car Charges In 10 Minutes

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MIT students are developing an electric car that could easily compete with petro-based vehicles.

Using a 2010 Mercury Milan hybrid and 7,905 lithium iron-phosphate batteries, the car fully charges in about 10 minutes. Whereas most EVs require overnight charging to reach full capacity, this is clearly a game changer.

Radu Gogoana, an undergraduate on the Electric Vehicle Team, says “Right now the thing that differentiates us [from car manufacturers] is that we’re exploring rapid recharge.”

The motor is an oil-cooled, three-phase 187 kW induction motor originally designed for electric buses. Installed in the Milan, the car will go from 0 to 60 in just 9 seconds and has a top speed of 100 mph at 12,000 RPMs. And each “ten minute” charge will get you about 200 miles before you’ll need another.

The vehicle needs 350 kW of power to obtain that ten minute charge time. But the car can also use a standard outlet which would require an overnight charge.

“That’s enough power [350 kW ] to blow the fuses on 20 residential homes at once,” Gogoana said.

Ideally, charging stations that delivers 356 V and 1000 A would be widely available.

Some companies are working on building charging stations nationwide. There are currently 40 ChargePoint stations across the U.S. The CT1000 ChargePoint can output 1.4 kilowatts, or 120 volts at 12 amps, which isn’t enough to rapidly recharge MIT’s car.

Another hitch is the cost of the battery array. It runs about $80,000. The team hopes that can be scaled by mass production. Um, me too.

The team’s press kit added that, “electrochemistry [of the batteries] is less volatile than that of other types of lithium-ion cells, which makes these batteries desirable in applications where crash safety is a high priority.”

Each member currently spends about 100 hours a week working on the project called the elEVen. The car is expected to be finished around the third quarter of 2010.

More on Student-built Electric Cars:

Source: DVICE



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About the Author

is a web developer, part-time blogger, and a full-time environmentalist. His crusade for all things eco started twenty years ago when he ditched his meat-and-potatoes upbringing for something more vegetarian-shaped. His passions include cooking, green tech, eco politics, and smart green design. And while he doesn't own a car anymore, he loves to write about those too. Jerry studied at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, CA. During his time there he was a DJ at the campus station KCPR and he also wrote for the campus paper. Jerry currently resides in San Francisco, CA with his cat Lola. You can stalk him on Twitter @jerryjamesstone.



  • Bob

    How much does the car weigh?

  • Bob

    How much does the car weigh?

  • http://mirandamarquit@gmail.com Miranda

    It’s clear that we have the ability to develop renewable and clean energy technology. What we lack, as a society, is the will.

  • asdf

    SECOND!

  • asdf

    SECOND!

  • asdf

    SECOND!

  • notrealy

    Beats the heck out of hydrogen powered cars, which strike me as a fundamentally questionable proposition. Go MIT!

  • notrealy

    Beats the heck out of hydrogen powered cars, which strike me as a fundamentally questionable proposition. Go MIT!

  • http://twitter.com/smnbss smnbss

    renewable? it all depends on how recyclable are the batteries, and at the cost of $80K only super rich could buy one. everyone says the technologies are there… I agree, technologies are there to build prototypes.

    US went to the moon 40 years ago, then why we all can’t go there even if the technologies exist? it will take 10/15 years to really have pollution free car, but first we need to find a way to generate a lot of electricity to recharge batteries, because it does not make sense having electric cars that recharged by energy created using coal

  • http://twitter.com/smnbss smnbss

    renewable? it all depends on how recyclable are the batteries, and at the cost of $80K only super rich could buy one. everyone says the technologies are there… I agree, technologies are there to build prototypes.

    US went to the moon 40 years ago, then why we all can’t go there even if the technologies exist? it will take 10/15 years to really have pollution free car, but first we need to find a way to generate a lot of electricity to recharge batteries, because it does not make sense having electric cars that recharged by energy created using coal

  • http://twitter.com/smnbss smnbss

    renewable? it all depends on how recyclable are the batteries, and at the cost of $80K only super rich could buy one. everyone says the technologies are there… I agree, technologies are there to build prototypes.

    US went to the moon 40 years ago, then why we all can’t go there even if the technologies exist? it will take 10/15 years to really have pollution free car, but first we need to find a way to generate a lot of electricity to recharge batteries, because it does not make sense having electric cars that recharged by energy created using coal

  • Mr. Sinister

    A game changer? Really? With an $80,000 battery pack and needing 350-kilowatts to ‘fast-charge’, you think this is a game changer? Gee … maybe with mass production, they can cut the cost down to a meager $40,000 … pocket change!

    Give us a break. There are teams of researchers all around the world building completely impractical power trains that will never see the light of day. This is just another teaching tool for the students. The real ‘game-changing’ work is being done in the R&D labs of the auto manufacturers and their suppliers. That’s where the engineers are working on designs that will work in the real world. Eventually combining both the affordability and reliability necessary for mass production. Only then will you see the game start to change.

    A lot of great work is being done in the colleges and universities, but sensationalizing every press release as ‘revolutionary’ gets a bit stale after a while.

  • Mr. Sinister

    A game changer? Really? With an $80,000 battery pack and needing 350-kilowatts to ‘fast-charge’, you think this is a game changer? Gee … maybe with mass production, they can cut the cost down to a meager $40,000 … pocket change!

    Give us a break. There are teams of researchers all around the world building completely impractical power trains that will never see the light of day. This is just another teaching tool for the students. The real ‘game-changing’ work is being done in the R&D labs of the auto manufacturers and their suppliers. That’s where the engineers are working on designs that will work in the real world. Eventually combining both the affordability and reliability necessary for mass production. Only then will you see the game start to change.

    A lot of great work is being done in the colleges and universities, but sensationalizing every press release as ‘revolutionary’ gets a bit stale after a while.

  • Mr. Sinister

    A game changer? Really? With an $80,000 battery pack and needing 350-kilowatts to ‘fast-charge’, you think this is a game changer? Gee … maybe with mass production, they can cut the cost down to a meager $40,000 … pocket change!

    Give us a break. There are teams of researchers all around the world building completely impractical power trains that will never see the light of day. This is just another teaching tool for the students. The real ‘game-changing’ work is being done in the R&D labs of the auto manufacturers and their suppliers. That’s where the engineers are working on designs that will work in the real world. Eventually combining both the affordability and reliability necessary for mass production. Only then will you see the game start to change.

    A lot of great work is being done in the colleges and universities, but sensationalizing every press release as ‘revolutionary’ gets a bit stale after a while.

  • Cassius

    The will and 80 grand for the battery pack.

  • Cassius

    The will and 80 grand for the battery pack.

  • ballsonyourchin

    Um, $80k? Really? The main goal of their project shouldn’t have been “how quick” they could charge the car, but how cost effective it could be built and a method of charging the car without always having to be plugged in. (i.e. Solar hood and roof. Alternator being spun by one of the forward wheels when moving providing a charge at all times.)

    I keep reading about how all these asshats keep running out and spending $100k on building an electric car. (Tesla, Chevy, etc..) None of them think past how fast it can go, how far, and what it will look like. An electric car that takes 380kw to charge isn’t using a renewable energy source. We’re talking about trading oil and gas for more dams, more brown outs on our aging power grids, more pollution from coal fired power plants, and nuclear waste from power plants to power cars whose battery technology is sub standard.

    These cars need to be engineered in a way that they are able to charge themselves somewhat and they need to use LESS energy to move.

  • ballsonyourchin

    Um, $80k? Really? The main goal of their project shouldn’t have been “how quick” they could charge the car, but how cost effective it could be built and a method of charging the car without always having to be plugged in. (i.e. Solar hood and roof. Alternator being spun by one of the forward wheels when moving providing a charge at all times.)

    I keep reading about how all these asshats keep running out and spending $100k on building an electric car. (Tesla, Chevy, etc..) None of them think past how fast it can go, how far, and what it will look like. An electric car that takes 380kw to charge isn’t using a renewable energy source. We’re talking about trading oil and gas for more dams, more brown outs on our aging power grids, more pollution from coal fired power plants, and nuclear waste from power plants to power cars whose battery technology is sub standard.

    These cars need to be engineered in a way that they are able to charge themselves somewhat and they need to use LESS energy to move.

  • ballsonyourchin

    Um, $80k? Really? The main goal of their project shouldn’t have been “how quick” they could charge the car, but how cost effective it could be built and a method of charging the car without always having to be plugged in. (i.e. Solar hood and roof. Alternator being spun by one of the forward wheels when moving providing a charge at all times.)

    I keep reading about how all these asshats keep running out and spending $100k on building an electric car. (Tesla, Chevy, etc..) None of them think past how fast it can go, how far, and what it will look like. An electric car that takes 380kw to charge isn’t using a renewable energy source. We’re talking about trading oil and gas for more dams, more brown outs on our aging power grids, more pollution from coal fired power plants, and nuclear waste from power plants to power cars whose battery technology is sub standard.

    These cars need to be engineered in a way that they are able to charge themselves somewhat and they need to use LESS energy to move.

  • Kevin

    Nice project, if there are only going to be a few of these on the road. There is no way that the fast charge they are talking about will be feasible with the current electrical grid. Some quick figures indicate that a typical 1 Gigawatt power plant would only support fast charge for less than 3000 cars, that is at peak output and no other load. That power plant could power approximately 1 million homes at 1kw each. I suspect the number of homes actually powered would be more like 100000 plus industry and businesses. So you can see many many more power plants would have to be built for everyone to transition to fast charge electric. Sure it only takes 10 minutes to charge but most people are going to plug it in when they get home or before they go to work so the 8-5 crowd make the rules. Either that or you plug it in and some kind of scheduling device picks a time so you might as well slow charge.

    The idea is cool and all just not doable on any kind of scale that would make a difference. If you have any doubt at all, call your local electric company for a quote on that kind of power service. Think 800 amps at 440 volts.

  • Kevin

    Nice project, if there are only going to be a few of these on the road. There is no way that the fast charge they are talking about will be feasible with the current electrical grid. Some quick figures indicate that a typical 1 Gigawatt power plant would only support fast charge for less than 3000 cars, that is at peak output and no other load. That power plant could power approximately 1 million homes at 1kw each. I suspect the number of homes actually powered would be more like 100000 plus industry and businesses. So you can see many many more power plants would have to be built for everyone to transition to fast charge electric. Sure it only takes 10 minutes to charge but most people are going to plug it in when they get home or before they go to work so the 8-5 crowd make the rules. Either that or you plug it in and some kind of scheduling device picks a time so you might as well slow charge.

    The idea is cool and all just not doable on any kind of scale that would make a difference. If you have any doubt at all, call your local electric company for a quote on that kind of power service. Think 800 amps at 440 volts.

  • Kevin

    Nice project, if there are only going to be a few of these on the road. There is no way that the fast charge they are talking about will be feasible with the current electrical grid. Some quick figures indicate that a typical 1 Gigawatt power plant would only support fast charge for less than 3000 cars, that is at peak output and no other load. That power plant could power approximately 1 million homes at 1kw each. I suspect the number of homes actually powered would be more like 100000 plus industry and businesses. So you can see many many more power plants would have to be built for everyone to transition to fast charge electric. Sure it only takes 10 minutes to charge but most people are going to plug it in when they get home or before they go to work so the 8-5 crowd make the rules. Either that or you plug it in and some kind of scheduling device picks a time so you might as well slow charge.

    The idea is cool and all just not doable on any kind of scale that would make a difference. If you have any doubt at all, call your local electric company for a quote on that kind of power service. Think 800 amps at 440 volts.

  • JJ Walker

    10 minute recharge? Where, at the local power plant…? Dream on.

  • JJ Walker

    10 minute recharge? Where, at the local power plant…? Dream on.

  • hottestgirl

    Precisely!

    This is is just why companies like Goss132.com stand a very good chance at becoming the next big car manufacturer.

    They recognize the technology already ‘exists’ (as they put it in faq), http://www.goss132.com/faq.html and that they are in the business of building a real car (full sized), and not some expensive over hyped ‘toy’ like the Tesla.

    These cars can be built today and at a fraction of the cost those big guys are saying.

    This student project PROVES it without a doubt in my mind. Just wish Goss had picture of theirs. Would be nice to see it.

    – Erica

  • hottestgirl

    Precisely!

    This is is just why companies like Goss132.com stand a very good chance at becoming the next big car manufacturer.

    They recognize the technology already ‘exists’ (as they put it in faq), http://www.goss132.com/faq.html and that they are in the business of building a real car (full sized), and not some expensive over hyped ‘toy’ like the Tesla.

    These cars can be built today and at a fraction of the cost those big guys are saying.

    This student project PROVES it without a doubt in my mind. Just wish Goss had picture of theirs. Would be nice to see it.

    – Erica

  • hottestgirl

    Precisely!

    This is is just why companies like Goss132.com stand a very good chance at becoming the next big car manufacturer.

    They recognize the technology already ‘exists’ (as they put it in faq), http://www.goss132.com/faq.html and that they are in the business of building a real car (full sized), and not some expensive over hyped ‘toy’ like the Tesla.

    These cars can be built today and at a fraction of the cost those big guys are saying.

    This student project PROVES it without a doubt in my mind. Just wish Goss had picture of theirs. Would be nice to see it.

    – Erica

  • munitions

    Clean, renewable energy, eh? Answer this: where is this energy coming from? …

    That’s correct.

  • munitions

    Clean, renewable energy, eh? Answer this: where is this energy coming from? …

    That’s correct.

  • n

    WOW, what a breakthrough. What’s nxt? A faster flushing toilet that used distilled water!?!?? This is not usable. This is not new Tech. Give it up for a NEW battery thats cheap, long lasting, and weighs nil.

  • n

    WOW, what a breakthrough. What’s nxt? A faster flushing toilet that used distilled water!?!?? This is not usable. This is not new Tech. Give it up for a NEW battery thats cheap, long lasting, and weighs nil.

  • Nick

    What’s up with the Porsche 914? Are they converting that too?

  • Nick

    What’s up with the Porsche 914? Are they converting that too?

  • pleasethinkfirst

    @ballsonyourchin

    “…Alternator being spun by one of the forward wheels when moving…” You would use more energy and get less in return if you did this…kind of like powering a light with your bicycle.

  • pleasethinkfirst

    @ballsonyourchin

    “…Alternator being spun by one of the forward wheels when moving…” You would use more energy and get less in return if you did this…kind of like powering a light with your bicycle.

  • pleasethinkfirst

    @ballsonyourchin

    “…Alternator being spun by one of the forward wheels when moving…” You would use more energy and get less in return if you did this…kind of like powering a light with your bicycle.

  • ChuckL

    What is the needed power to recharge a dead battery? Please give this in KwH needed to bring the battery from dead to full charge. With this information we will be able to check our own electric bills and determine how much it will cost us to recharge the vehicle.

    Based on my last electric bill of $125 and 1015 KwH, this car would cost me about $43 to cover 200 miles. My Dodge Dakota Pick-up does better than this.

  • ChuckL

    What is the needed power to recharge a dead battery? Please give this in KwH needed to bring the battery from dead to full charge. With this information we will be able to check our own electric bills and determine how much it will cost us to recharge the vehicle.

    Based on my last electric bill of $125 and 1015 KwH, this car would cost me about $43 to cover 200 miles. My Dodge Dakota Pick-up does better than this.

  • ChuckL

    What is the needed power to recharge a dead battery? Please give this in KwH needed to bring the battery from dead to full charge. With this information we will be able to check our own electric bills and determine how much it will cost us to recharge the vehicle.

    Based on my last electric bill of $125 and 1015 KwH, this car would cost me about $43 to cover 200 miles. My Dodge Dakota Pick-up does better than this.

  • Jose

    But in the end, it still ends up costing about the same or more, fuel-wise, as a car that gets 24 mpg (24 mpg @ $2.50 a gallon = 8.3 gallons to drive 200 miles and a total of $20.8. Also, 300 kW to drive 200 miles @ $0.10 kwh = $30). I’m not saying it’s not great having something running on something other than gasoline, but unless that electricity comes from sun, wind or hydro, then most likely it is coming from coal, which is just as bad if not worse as petroleum. So in the end, you might as well have a car that runs on coal because that is exactly what it is. Unless you can make sure your electricity is coming from something renewable, it’s still dirty fuel. I think people need to realize that if we are going to create electric vehicles, we also need to come up with a completely cleaner form of electricity as well.

  • Jose

    But in the end, it still ends up costing about the same or more, fuel-wise, as a car that gets 24 mpg (24 mpg @ $2.50 a gallon = 8.3 gallons to drive 200 miles and a total of $20.8. Also, 300 kW to drive 200 miles @ $0.10 kwh = $30). I’m not saying it’s not great having something running on something other than gasoline, but unless that electricity comes from sun, wind or hydro, then most likely it is coming from coal, which is just as bad if not worse as petroleum. So in the end, you might as well have a car that runs on coal because that is exactly what it is. Unless you can make sure your electricity is coming from something renewable, it’s still dirty fuel. I think people need to realize that if we are going to create electric vehicles, we also need to come up with a completely cleaner form of electricity as well.

  • Jose

    But in the end, it still ends up costing about the same or more, fuel-wise, as a car that gets 24 mpg (24 mpg @ $2.50 a gallon = 8.3 gallons to drive 200 miles and a total of $20.8. Also, 300 kW to drive 200 miles @ $0.10 kwh = $30). I’m not saying it’s not great having something running on something other than gasoline, but unless that electricity comes from sun, wind or hydro, then most likely it is coming from coal, which is just as bad if not worse as petroleum. So in the end, you might as well have a car that runs on coal because that is exactly what it is. Unless you can make sure your electricity is coming from something renewable, it’s still dirty fuel. I think people need to realize that if we are going to create electric vehicles, we also need to come up with a completely cleaner form of electricity as well.

  • http://gas2.org mimi

    Great idea, now if you can sell it to one of the American car companies or start your own car company that would work!!!! Proud to be an American!

  • http://gas2.org mimi

    Great idea, now if you can sell it to one of the American car companies or start your own car company that would work!!!! Proud to be an American!

  • http://gas2.org mimi

    Great idea, now if you can sell it to one of the American car companies or start your own car company that would work!!!! Proud to be an American!

  • MikeyBoy

    This is one of the few mainstream technologies where an individual can use a personal green source of energy to charge their car. Those with enough space can use solar and wind, those without can pay for electricity through a green company. We’ll never be able to produce gasoline in our back yards. Biodiesel is only practical as long as the waste oil is seen as a ‘waste’ product and is “free”.

    Then for those who could care less – where is it easier to control pollution – hundreds of millions of vehicles (each with their own pollution control systems, catalytic converters, etc.) or less than 20,000 power plants (DoE statistics)? Electricity is very portable and can be generated in so many ways, and we don’t have to wait on the infrastructure to be built.

    At this stage, quick charging would be good for fleet operations. Others can wait overnight for a majority of their needs, when most plants are still generating power because they cannot truly idle.

    The more the separation between a capacitor and a traditional battery blur, the better.

  • MikeyBoy

    This is one of the few mainstream technologies where an individual can use a personal green source of energy to charge their car. Those with enough space can use solar and wind, those without can pay for electricity through a green company. We’ll never be able to produce gasoline in our back yards. Biodiesel is only practical as long as the waste oil is seen as a ‘waste’ product and is “free”.

    Then for those who could care less – where is it easier to control pollution – hundreds of millions of vehicles (each with their own pollution control systems, catalytic converters, etc.) or less than 20,000 power plants (DoE statistics)? Electricity is very portable and can be generated in so many ways, and we don’t have to wait on the infrastructure to be built.

    At this stage, quick charging would be good for fleet operations. Others can wait overnight for a majority of their needs, when most plants are still generating power because they cannot truly idle.

    The more the separation between a capacitor and a traditional battery blur, the better.

  • MikeyBoy

    This is one of the few mainstream technologies where an individual can use a personal green source of energy to charge their car. Those with enough space can use solar and wind, those without can pay for electricity through a green company. We’ll never be able to produce gasoline in our back yards. Biodiesel is only practical as long as the waste oil is seen as a ‘waste’ product and is “free”.

    Then for those who could care less – where is it easier to control pollution – hundreds of millions of vehicles (each with their own pollution control systems, catalytic converters, etc.) or less than 20,000 power plants (DoE statistics)? Electricity is very portable and can be generated in so many ways, and we don’t have to wait on the infrastructure to be built.

    At this stage, quick charging would be good for fleet operations. Others can wait overnight for a majority of their needs, when most plants are still generating power because they cannot truly idle.

    The more the separation between a capacitor and a traditional battery blur, the better.

  • David Wallace

    Whats this with having to travel cross country.I have not gone more than 125 miles in one day in 2 years and if I needed to I could rent a car to travel in.

  • David Wallace

    Whats this with having to travel cross country.I have not gone more than 125 miles in one day in 2 years and if I needed to I could rent a car to travel in.

  • Bill Dale

    Last week, after months of road blocks of every variety, I finished converting a BMW coupe to full electric power with lithium iron phosphate batteries. Um… well, not really COMPLETED it… if you look at it on You Tube (BMW EV Conversion Burns Rubber) you’ll see it still needs to be painted, and the interior needs to be redone. But it does work, is very powerful, and if I was listening to some of the characters above that are spewing rhetoric, I would never even started.

    You can’t compare an EV to gasoline cars with just a few simple numbers. Yes, it cost me a lot of money to convert.

    But with the price of gas continually creeping up (the only reason there was a hiccup in prices last winter was because so many people lost their jobs, reducing demand significantly) and I’d be willing to bet it’ll reach well over $4. a gallon by the end of the year, making my conversion a very good investment.

    And unlike the gas guzzlers you drive, the wattage my EV runs off of (petroleum) will never be controlled by several very powerful countries that treat their citizenry like dirt, and that support terrorism as Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iran, and Venezuela do… all of those countries are hostile to us and only sell oil to us because they need/want our money as much as we need their oil.

    Unlike the gasoline in your car, my car can be powered by my roof should electricity become a problem to buy from the utility companies. I went to a party at the home of Chris Paine a few weeks ago (director/writer of “Who Killed the Electric Car?”) and he has solar panels on his roof that charge his electric Tesla, so even if you’ve got a very powerful EV, it can still keep you on the road and all you’re spending is for tires, insurance and incidentals.

    An EV will outlast a gasoline car easily. And by the time my batteries do wear out enough that I need to get new ones (10 years from now), they can still be used to store charge from my solar panels, and any newer batteries are likely to have much better tech such as that of Altairnano’s NanoSafe battery, or the STAIR battery (St Andrews Air Battery) that can store 10 times as much energy as the batteries we have today.

    And by combining the best features of a few of these new batteries, we could have something that can be recharged very quickly, will give us hundreds of miles between charges, cost much less than it would cost to build a gasoline vehicle today, and won’t poison our air and our lungs… plus we’ll have all the other advantages we already know about EVs.

  • Bill Dale

    Last week, after months of road blocks of every variety, I finished converting a BMW coupe to full electric power with lithium iron phosphate batteries. Um… well, not really COMPLETED it… if you look at it on You Tube (BMW EV Conversion Burns Rubber) you’ll see it still needs to be painted, and the interior needs to be redone. But it does work, is very powerful, and if I was listening to some of the characters above that are spewing rhetoric, I would never even started.

    You can’t compare an EV to gasoline cars with just a few simple numbers. Yes, it cost me a lot of money to convert.

    But with the price of gas continually creeping up (the only reason there was a hiccup in prices last winter was because so many people lost their jobs, reducing demand significantly) and I’d be willing to bet it’ll reach well over $4. a gallon by the end of the year, making my conversion a very good investment.

    And unlike the gas guzzlers you drive, the wattage my EV runs off of (petroleum) will never be controlled by several very powerful countries that treat their citizenry like dirt, and that support terrorism as Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iran, and Venezuela do… all of those countries are hostile to us and only sell oil to us because they need/want our money as much as we need their oil.

    Unlike the gasoline in your car, my car can be powered by my roof should electricity become a problem to buy from the utility companies. I went to a party at the home of Chris Paine a few weeks ago (director/writer of “Who Killed the Electric Car?”) and he has solar panels on his roof that charge his electric Tesla, so even if you’ve got a very powerful EV, it can still keep you on the road and all you’re spending is for tires, insurance and incidentals.

    An EV will outlast a gasoline car easily. And by the time my batteries do wear out enough that I need to get new ones (10 years from now), they can still be used to store charge from my solar panels, and any newer batteries are likely to have much better tech such as that of Altairnano’s NanoSafe battery, or the STAIR battery (St Andrews Air Battery) that can store 10 times as much energy as the batteries we have today.

    And by combining the best features of a few of these new batteries, we could have something that can be recharged very quickly, will give us hundreds of miles between charges, cost much less than it would cost to build a gasoline vehicle today, and won’t poison our air and our lungs… plus we’ll have all the other advantages we already know about EVs.

  • Bill Dale

    Last week, after months of road blocks of every variety, I finished converting a BMW coupe to full electric power with lithium iron phosphate batteries. Um… well, not really COMPLETED it… if you look at it on You Tube (BMW EV Conversion Burns Rubber) you’ll see it still needs to be painted, and the interior needs to be redone. But it does work, is very powerful, and if I was listening to some of the characters above that are spewing rhetoric, I would never even started.

    You can’t compare an EV to gasoline cars with just a few simple numbers. Yes, it cost me a lot of money to convert.

    But with the price of gas continually creeping up (the only reason there was a hiccup in prices last winter was because so many people lost their jobs, reducing demand significantly) and I’d be willing to bet it’ll reach well over $4. a gallon by the end of the year, making my conversion a very good investment.

    And unlike the gas guzzlers you drive, the wattage my EV runs off of (petroleum) will never be controlled by several very powerful countries that treat their citizenry like dirt, and that support terrorism as Saudi Arabia, Syria, Iran, and Venezuela do… all of those countries are hostile to us and only sell oil to us because they need/want our money as much as we need their oil.

    Unlike the gasoline in your car, my car can be powered by my roof should electricity become a problem to buy from the utility companies. I went to a party at the home of Chris Paine a few weeks ago (director/writer of “Who Killed the Electric Car?”) and he has solar panels on his roof that charge his electric Tesla, so even if you’ve got a very powerful EV, it can still keep you on the road and all you’re spending is for tires, insurance and incidentals.

    An EV will outlast a gasoline car easily. And by the time my batteries do wear out enough that I need to get new ones (10 years from now), they can still be used to store charge from my solar panels, and any newer batteries are likely to have much better tech such as that of Altairnano’s NanoSafe battery, or the STAIR battery (St Andrews Air Battery) that can store 10 times as much energy as the batteries we have today.

    And by combining the best features of a few of these new batteries, we could have something that can be recharged very quickly, will give us hundreds of miles between charges, cost much less than it would cost to build a gasoline vehicle today, and won’t poison our air and our lungs… plus we’ll have all the other advantages we already know about EVs.

  • http://gasburner.blogspot.com/ gasburner

    I think we have to see this as what it is: an interesting piece of engineering research. This is not an announcement of a product release. There are very obvious reasons why we are not talking about a commercial technology. But here we get to see research in action. For me that is the real point of an article like this. It is a window into the future. Also, as a previous comment pointed out, this is important from an educational standpoint. Those dozen or so people in the photo will be the technicians and engineers who will be designing and deploying the next generation of commercial products.

  • Tony

    Let’s see, a bunch of kids can build cars that require no petroleum. You know, the fact that kids are even working on this, proves that as a society we DO have the will – its our wonderful fascist government that exists solely for industrialists and bankers that is standing in the way, and the media that brainwashes the purposefully undereducated population to go along with it.

    If you knew the world that is today possible, but is denied to us by regulation and corporate monopolies and special interest lobbyists, and of course the autocratic tyrants, eugenicists, and Malthusians in our government, you’d stop paying your taxes today, vote third party the rest of your life, and throw your TV out the window – maybe replace it with workshop and start literally building your own, better, society, regulations be damned – like these kids in this article.

  • Tony

    Let’s see, a bunch of kids can build cars that require no petroleum. You know, the fact that kids are even working on this, proves that as a society we DO have the will – its our wonderful fascist government that exists solely for industrialists and bankers that is standing in the way, and the media that brainwashes the purposefully undereducated population to go along with it.

    If you knew the world that is today possible, but is denied to us by regulation and corporate monopolies and special interest lobbyists, and of course the autocratic tyrants, eugenicists, and Malthusians in our government, you’d stop paying your taxes today, vote third party the rest of your life, and throw your TV out the window – maybe replace it with workshop and start literally building your own, better, society, regulations be damned – like these kids in this article.

  • http://gasburner.blogspot.com/ gasburner

    I think we have to see this as what it is: an interesting piece of engineering research. This is not an announcement of a product release. There are very obvious reasons why we are not talking about a commercial technology. But here we get to see research in action. For me that is the real point of an article like this. It is a window into the future. Also, as a previous comment pointed out, this is important from an educational standpoint. Those dozen or so people in the photo will be the technicians and engineers who will be designing and deploying the next generation of commercial products.

  • Tony

    Let’s see, a bunch of kids can build cars that require no petroleum. You know, the fact that kids are even working on this, proves that as a society we DO have the will – its our wonderful fascist government that exists solely for industrialists and bankers that is standing in the way, and the media that brainwashes the purposefully undereducated population to go along with it.

    If you knew the world that is today possible, but is denied to us by regulation and corporate monopolies and special interest lobbyists, and of course the autocratic tyrants, eugenicists, and Malthusians in our government, you’d stop paying your taxes today, vote third party the rest of your life, and throw your TV out the window – maybe replace it with workshop and start literally building your own, better, society, regulations be damned – like these kids in this article.

  • http://Pluginmotors.com Michael Brown

    Why is this suddenly news? We have had our prototype Mustang on the road for 6months. Same technology, batteries etc. The most practical application is the Ford F-150 which will top out over 85mph, 220 mile range, charge from existing 110/240v outlets in 3-6 hrs. It costs about 3 cents per mile to operate versus cl;oser to 25 cents for a gas engine. It returns about $35,00 in fuel and maintenance savings per 100,000 miles and has an expected life over 500,000 miles. We are currently setting up our production facility and will begin delivering to our fleet operators before the end of the year.

  • http://Pluginmotors.com Michael Brown

    Why is this suddenly news? We have had our prototype Mustang on the road for 6months. Same technology, batteries etc. The most practical application is the Ford F-150 which will top out over 85mph, 220 mile range, charge from existing 110/240v outlets in 3-6 hrs. It costs about 3 cents per mile to operate versus cl;oser to 25 cents for a gas engine. It returns about $35,00 in fuel and maintenance savings per 100,000 miles and has an expected life over 500,000 miles. We are currently setting up our production facility and will begin delivering to our fleet operators before the end of the year.

  • tony

    this is really cool 10min. thats really fast…. hey maybe one can add class to this and put it in the karma fisker(also a cool electric car)

  • tony

    this is really cool 10min. thats really fast…. hey maybe one can add class to this and put it in the karma fisker(also a cool electric car)

  • Sandy

    Who’s the handsome man in the green striped polo? Call me ;) 617 699 8144

  • Sandy

    Who’s the handsome man in the green striped polo? Call me ;) 617 699 8144

  • Sandy

    Who’s the handsome man in the green striped polo? Call me ;) 617 699 8144

  • Monty

    Psh.

    My group made an electric that recharges in 9 minutes back in ’74.

    Chumps.

  • Monty

    Psh.

    My group made an electric that recharges in 9 minutes back in ’74.

    Chumps.

  • Monty

    Psh.

    My group made an electric that recharges in 9 minutes back in ’74.

    Chumps.

  • Nuance

    Very interesting notice. One technical clarification (it would have helped if the writer had included this info) – 350 kW for 10 minutes = about 60 kWh or about the same as a more modest 6kW for 10 hours. Rule of thumb is that a car will get about 2-3 miles per kWh so the numbers are not unreasonable. If we assume 10 cents per kWh and a cost of only $2.00 for a car getting 30 mpg then 200 miles will cost $6.00 worth of electricity or about $13 for gas ($26+ at $4 per gallon).

    While the ability to fast charge is a “silver bullet” for electric cars – helping make them more identical in key performance to a ICE auto, massive additional cost for such a feature would probably push it out of the range of most people – but it is only a nice-to-have item anyway: allowing you to recharge if you are unable to do so at home or are on a long trip. For a much cheaper reliable car, most people could deal with charging every night and rent a car if they had to make a long trip.

    To all those who are so “down” on electric cars because they are “expensive” or “use so much electricity that they just pollute the same anyway (wrong btw)” – relax – no one is making you buy one but don’t go carrying freight for the oil companies!

    To put things in persepctive, in 1908, I understand that the Ford Model T cost $1,950, by 1912 “it sold for $575 . . . [and] for the first time cost less than the prevailing average annual wage in the United States”.

  • Nuance

    Very interesting notice. One technical clarification (it would have helped if the writer had included this info) – 350 kW for 10 minutes = about 60 kWh or about the same as a more modest 6kW for 10 hours. Rule of thumb is that a car will get about 2-3 miles per kWh so the numbers are not unreasonable. If we assume 10 cents per kWh and a cost of only $2.00 for a car getting 30 mpg then 200 miles will cost $6.00 worth of electricity or about $13 for gas ($26+ at $4 per gallon).

    While the ability to fast charge is a “silver bullet” for electric cars – helping make them more identical in key performance to a ICE auto, massive additional cost for such a feature would probably push it out of the range of most people – but it is only a nice-to-have item anyway: allowing you to recharge if you are unable to do so at home or are on a long trip. For a much cheaper reliable car, most people could deal with charging every night and rent a car if they had to make a long trip.

    To all those who are so “down” on electric cars because they are “expensive” or “use so much electricity that they just pollute the same anyway (wrong btw)” – relax – no one is making you buy one but don’t go carrying freight for the oil companies!

    To put things in persepctive, in 1908, I understand that the Ford Model T cost $1,950, by 1912 “it sold for $575 . . . [and] for the first time cost less than the prevailing average annual wage in the United States”.

  • eric

    I suggest the following.

    Coil the batteries around the motor

    Saturate the batteries with titatnium/silver nitrates (oxides?)

    The motor acts as a generator at the same time it runs, increasing efficiency

    May be a rather large device in the end, but would seem to be a very effective way to increase efficiency. Less batteries needed, presumably reduces the need for more amperage, thus decreasing charging times from a regular wall socket.

    Gas2 has permission to release my email if further consultation is requested (I dream big).

  • eric

    I suggest the following.

    Coil the batteries around the motor

    Saturate the batteries with titatnium/silver nitrates (oxides?)

    The motor acts as a generator at the same time it runs, increasing efficiency

    May be a rather large device in the end, but would seem to be a very effective way to increase efficiency. Less batteries needed, presumably reduces the need for more amperage, thus decreasing charging times from a regular wall socket.

    Gas2 has permission to release my email if further consultation is requested (I dream big).

  • eric

    I suggest the following.

    Coil the batteries around the motor

    Saturate the batteries with titatnium/silver nitrates (oxides?)

    The motor acts as a generator at the same time it runs, increasing efficiency

    May be a rather large device in the end, but would seem to be a very effective way to increase efficiency. Less batteries needed, presumably reduces the need for more amperage, thus decreasing charging times from a regular wall socket.

    Gas2 has permission to release my email if further consultation is requested (I dream big).

  • Viggo

    Stop being so negative guys. New technology is always good. While batteries may be expensive today doesn’t mean they will always be expensive.

    An example: Building a computer with 1GB of RAM in 1990 would have been ridiculous. The RAM alone would cost an insane amount of money. Fortunately the prices of RAM have gone down from around $100 to $0.011 pr MB since then.

    (Ref: http://www.jcmit.com/memoryprice.htm)

    Most probably the batteries will also be cheaper sooner or later.

  • Viggo

    Stop being so negative guys. New technology is always good. While batteries may be expensive today doesn’t mean they will always be expensive.

    An example: Building a computer with 1GB of RAM in 1990 would have been ridiculous. The RAM alone would cost an insane amount of money. Fortunately the prices of RAM have gone down from around $100 to $0.011 pr MB since then.

    (Ref: http://www.jcmit.com/memoryprice.htm)

    Most probably the batteries will also be cheaper sooner or later.

  • Gss

    No, we didn’t go to the moon 40 yrs ago. We never went to the moon.

  • Gss

    No, we didn’t go to the moon 40 yrs ago. We never went to the moon.

  • Andi

    This is nothing new. A 10min charge electric car is available in the UK.

    Check the link:

    http://www.lightningcarcompany.co.uk

    I think they announced it in 2008.

  • Andi

    This is nothing new. A 10min charge electric car is available in the UK.

    Check the link:

    http://www.lightningcarcompany.co.uk

    I think they announced it in 2008.

  • http://www.evadc.org EVmaven

    Some years ago, I saw a live demo of a 50 kW, 480 volt power station that recharged an electric pickup truck to an 85% charge in about 20 minutes. So yes, this is definitely pushing the bounds of EV development.

    This kind of power requires a dedicated transformer, but is about the same power demand of a large retail store (think Home Depot or Costco)- but for only 10 minutes, i.e. – about 35 kWh, which is NOT a major burden on the grid. Fast-charge stations could be set up most anywhere that three-phase power is available (ex: multi-fuel stations along Interstate highways) and would be especially appropriate for areas where *wind energy* is growing but is often “stranded” from the grid.

    Re battery costs, that limited-production $80K 35 kWh Li-Ion could be reduced to as little as $10K (about $250/kWh) in mass production, according to the Electric Power Research Institute, and last for about 10 years ($1K/year is equivalent to maintenance costs for an internal combustion vehicle.)

    Li-Ion batteries are currently being recycled in Canada and will continue to be recycled, in part due to the value of the Lithium and Cobalt.

    To answer Bob’s question, a 35 kWh battery weighs about 1100 pounds – about the same as the V6 gas engine, transmission, full gas tank, cooling and exhaust systems, which are no longer needed. So an EV like this probably weighs about the same as the original gas vehicle (est. about 3600 pounds

    My strong suspicion is that MIT is working with Ford and DOE on this project. Many of these MIT engineering students will likely end up working for major car companies like Ford, developing the next generation of cars, trucks and SUVs – including multifuel Plug-in Hybrids (PHEVs,)running on E85 and electricity and getting the equivalent of *500 mpg* on the petroleum content. This will go a long way towards reducing US dependence on foreign oil.

    It will also reduce carbon- and smog-forming emissions in most parts of the country, according to DOE, EPRI and the California Air Resources Board (CARB,) because electric motors are *way* more efficient than ICEs,

    So, to the extent that MIT’s fast charging project helps to overcome the “range anxiety” that limits EV acceptance, this project is way cool. Go MIT!

  • http://www.evadc.org EVmaven

    Some years ago, I saw a live demo of a 50 kW, 480 volt power station that recharged an electric pickup truck to an 85% charge in about 20 minutes. So yes, this is definitely pushing the bounds of EV development.

    This kind of power requires a dedicated transformer, but is about the same power demand of a large retail store (think Home Depot or Costco)- but for only 10 minutes, i.e. – about 35 kWh, which is NOT a major burden on the grid. Fast-charge stations could be set up most anywhere that three-phase power is available (ex: multi-fuel stations along Interstate highways) and would be especially appropriate for areas where *wind energy* is growing but is often “stranded” from the grid.

    Re battery costs, that limited-production $80K 35 kWh Li-Ion could be reduced to as little as $10K (about $250/kWh) in mass production, according to the Electric Power Research Institute, and last for about 10 years ($1K/year is equivalent to maintenance costs for an internal combustion vehicle.)

    Li-Ion batteries are currently being recycled in Canada and will continue to be recycled, in part due to the value of the Lithium and Cobalt.

    To answer Bob’s question, a 35 kWh battery weighs about 1100 pounds – about the same as the V6 gas engine, transmission, full gas tank, cooling and exhaust systems, which are no longer needed. So an EV like this probably weighs about the same as the original gas vehicle (est. about 3600 pounds

    My strong suspicion is that MIT is working with Ford and DOE on this project. Many of these MIT engineering students will likely end up working for major car companies like Ford, developing the next generation of cars, trucks and SUVs – including multifuel Plug-in Hybrids (PHEVs,)running on E85 and electricity and getting the equivalent of *500 mpg* on the petroleum content. This will go a long way towards reducing US dependence on foreign oil.

    It will also reduce carbon- and smog-forming emissions in most parts of the country, according to DOE, EPRI and the California Air Resources Board (CARB,) because electric motors are *way* more efficient than ICEs,

    So, to the extent that MIT’s fast charging project helps to overcome the “range anxiety” that limits EV acceptance, this project is way cool. Go MIT!

  • http://www.noobcity.com Bryn

    I’m sick of you n00bs tryna come on this site and jack everybody up like they know nothing by spurting off useless stuff that you think you know.

    chuckL: it takes just a little under 59 kwh to fully charge the car, which makes it in effect quite inexpensive.

    others: don’t suggest anything other than regenerative braking in the drivetrain to recharge the battery. that is n00b city.

    now please everybody punch their return tickets and stop flaming on an article that is simply celebrating some exciting advances in battery and EV tech, not a new product for the mass market.

  • http://www.noobcity.com Bryn

    I’m sick of you n00bs tryna come on this site and jack everybody up like they know nothing by spurting off useless stuff that you think you know.

    chuckL: it takes just a little under 59 kwh to fully charge the car, which makes it in effect quite inexpensive.

    others: don’t suggest anything other than regenerative braking in the drivetrain to recharge the battery. that is n00b city.

    now please everybody punch their return tickets and stop flaming on an article that is simply celebrating some exciting advances in battery and EV tech, not a new product for the mass market.

  • w.m.

    look for them all to mysteriously disappear, or die particularly strange accidental deaths….There are people capable of solving these kinds of problems, and some very powerful other people who don’t want them to do so.

  • w.m.

    look for them all to mysteriously disappear, or die particularly strange accidental deaths….There are people capable of solving these kinds of problems, and some very powerful other people who don’t want them to do so.

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  • Thinker

    80K = price of batteries, you need to add on the price of the vehicle after that. Which given that they have a low production volume drive line I am sure is another 80K on top of the batteries. Not to mention that charging batteries at 1000A will shorten the overall life of the batteries to the point that you are spending another 80K on a new battery pack in a year.

    Claim – “And each “ten minute” charge will get you about 200 miles”

    Sanity Check:

    -1000A charge current for a 10 minute charge.

    -A ten minute charge requires you to charge at 6 times the capacity of the battery pack.

    -So the battery capacity is 1000A/6 = 167Ah

    -The pack voltage is 356V

    -Total Power is V*I = 167*356 = 59.5kWh

    -With a 187kW motor that likely runs at 40kW nominally you will be able to drive this car for about 1.5 hours (59.5kWh / 40kW)

    -At 1.5 hours of driving the car would need to average about 133 MPH to travel the 200 miles they claim.

    -Either their mileage estimate is done at 2 MPH or it is only a theoretical number. Either way they are trying to lie to us.

    It is bogus articles like these that raise unrealistic expectations of EVs and make it so difficult for real EVs to make it to market.

  • Thinker

    80K = price of batteries, you need to add on the price of the vehicle after that. Which given that they have a low production volume drive line I am sure is another 80K on top of the batteries. Not to mention that charging batteries at 1000A will shorten the overall life of the batteries to the point that you are spending another 80K on a new battery pack in a year.

    Claim – “And each “ten minute” charge will get you about 200 miles”

    Sanity Check:

    -1000A charge current for a 10 minute charge.

    -A ten minute charge requires you to charge at 6 times the capacity of the battery pack.

    -So the battery capacity is 1000A/6 = 167Ah

    -The pack voltage is 356V

    -Total Power is V*I = 167*356 = 59.5kWh

    -With a 187kW motor that likely runs at 40kW nominally you will be able to drive this car for about 1.5 hours (59.5kWh / 40kW)

    -At 1.5 hours of driving the car would need to average about 133 MPH to travel the 200 miles they claim.

    -Either their mileage estimate is done at 2 MPH or it is only a theoretical number. Either way they are trying to lie to us.

    It is bogus articles like these that raise unrealistic expectations of EVs and make it so difficult for real EVs to make it to market.

  • Bohdan…

    Well, this is how science makes strides ladies and gentlemen. Sure, the pack may have cost $80,000. After some time, more and more engineers and scientists will look at it and figure out how to do it together. Think of all the technology that came out of the space programs. Sure, it cost a lot. But, further down the line all society benefits.

  • Bohdan…

    Well, this is how science makes strides ladies and gentlemen. Sure, the pack may have cost $80,000. After some time, more and more engineers and scientists will look at it and figure out how to do it together. Think of all the technology that came out of the space programs. Sure, it cost a lot. But, further down the line all society benefits.

  • AlternativeEnergyFan

    Come on, people, get a grip. This is a GOOD thing!

    It’s a research project. As in, “Let’s see what’s possible.” Yeah, it’s expensive today. But if it works well, don’t you think there will be someone out there tomorrow figuring out how to make the batteries less expensively and building charging stations (instead of gas stations)?

    Solar power and other alternative power sources are also currently under development, and will be vastly improved in the years to come. So who says that the Electric Vehicle of tomorrow won’t be powered by your own super-efficient solar power generator at home – or on the road, for that matter?

    So GO MIT!! I, for one, can’t wait to see where this leads!

  • AlternativeEnergyFan

    Come on, people, get a grip. This is a GOOD thing!

    It’s a research project. As in, “Let’s see what’s possible.” Yeah, it’s expensive today. But if it works well, don’t you think there will be someone out there tomorrow figuring out how to make the batteries less expensively and building charging stations (instead of gas stations)?

    Solar power and other alternative power sources are also currently under development, and will be vastly improved in the years to come. So who says that the Electric Vehicle of tomorrow won’t be powered by your own super-efficient solar power generator at home – or on the road, for that matter?

    So GO MIT!! I, for one, can’t wait to see where this leads!

  • VIJAY KHONDE

    I wish to purchase a electric car

  • VIJAY KHONDE

    I wish to purchase a electric car

  • Eric

    Those look like A123 cells to me. Can anyone confirm this?

  • Eric

    Those look like A123 cells to me. Can anyone confirm this?

  • http://www.green-planet-solar-energy.com Roger

    Clearly the new battery technology is what is raising the price at this stage. If the battery can be charged as quickly as it says, they will soon be in mass production for pretty much all cars (assuming they can be produced cost effectively at scale). Then these students will be a rich as princes and have more than enough money to buy themselves a Tesla Roadster each.

  • http://www.green-planet-solar-energy.com Roger

    Clearly the new battery technology is what is raising the price at this stage. If the battery can be charged as quickly as it says, they will soon be in mass production for pretty much all cars (assuming they can be produced cost effectively at scale). Then these students will be a rich as princes and have more than enough money to buy themselves a Tesla Roadster each.

  • http://www.gas-mileage-cars.com Gas Mileage Cars

    Interesting work on part of the MIT team here, though it looks like the real challenge is how the average person will get access to enough juice to really charge this thing in 10 minutes.

  • http://www.gas-mileage-cars.com Gas Mileage Cars

    Interesting work on part of the MIT team here, though it looks like the real challenge is how the average person will get access to enough juice to really charge this thing in 10 minutes.

  • Phil Kennedy

    Well done on producing the car, GM and other companies have also done it well too, but unfortunately the Oil companies and the cronies will stop you threatening their nest egg the same as GM unfortunately it is all about money. You imagine you use solar technology to to offset the long tail pipe arguement then you threaten the Coal and power companies. I am not saying give up just don’t kid yourself that they really want to do anything about pollution or dependance on foreign oil. Good luck don’t give up. Have faith that one day we can drive electric cars. Long Live the EV1

  • Phil Kennedy

    Well done on producing the car, GM and other companies have also done it well too, but unfortunately the Oil companies and the cronies will stop you threatening their nest egg the same as GM unfortunately it is all about money. You imagine you use solar technology to to offset the long tail pipe arguement then you threaten the Coal and power companies. I am not saying give up just don’t kid yourself that they really want to do anything about pollution or dependance on foreign oil. Good luck don’t give up. Have faith that one day we can drive electric cars. Long Live the EV1

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  • http://www.motorkwik.com/ Antony

    What about the back up?I mean how long it will hold the charge?

  • http://www.motorkwik.com/ Antony

    What about the back up?I mean how long it will hold the charge?

  • usuk

    it’s impractical. no, sorry kids, no dice, go back to class.

  • usuk

    it’s impractical. no, sorry kids, no dice, go back to class.

  • Gerrit

    Take a couple of standard outlets, load some condensers and you can charge with the needed amount of power … no big deal. You won’t even need an extra power plant to do so … because most of the people will charge their cars at home at night when plenty of power is available.

    But, there is one major Problem no one seems to acknowledge. We do not have enough lithium to produce the batteries.

  • Gerrit

    Take a couple of standard outlets, load some condensers and you can charge with the needed amount of power … no big deal. You won’t even need an extra power plant to do so … because most of the people will charge their cars at home at night when plenty of power is available.

    But, there is one major Problem no one seems to acknowledge. We do not have enough lithium to produce the batteries.

  • R Miller

    Ideally something like this should be inexpensive enough to put it within reach of a large percentage of the driving public or it makes no sense. Make these full electric cars cheap enough for pretty much anyone to use them for daily commuting and you’ve made a major dent in our dependence on fossil fuels.

    Take it a step farther and create a solar collector that would charge something at you home that could then be used to recharge the car overnight. For most driving it would take a number of days to use up a full charge in the car so even if it took a couple of days for the solar system to build up the necessary charge it would be feasible. Now you’ve not only taken the commute out of the fossil fuel equation but you’ve moved the charging process off the grid.

  • R Miller

    Ideally something like this should be inexpensive enough to put it within reach of a large percentage of the driving public or it makes no sense. Make these full electric cars cheap enough for pretty much anyone to use them for daily commuting and you’ve made a major dent in our dependence on fossil fuels.

    Take it a step farther and create a solar collector that would charge something at you home that could then be used to recharge the car overnight. For most driving it would take a number of days to use up a full charge in the car so even if it took a couple of days for the solar system to build up the necessary charge it would be feasible. Now you’ve not only taken the commute out of the fossil fuel equation but you’ve moved the charging process off the grid.

  • http://www.shoutmeloud.com/ Harsh Agrawal

    Great innovation … Kudos to the kid..!!!

  • http://www.shoutmeloud.com/ Harsh Agrawal

    Great innovation … Kudos to the kid..!!!

  • Me

    Green people are funny… “game changer”…

    Good luck getting 1000 Amps at your house.

  • Me

    Green people are funny… “game changer”…

    Good luck getting 1000 Amps at your house.

  • http:installsolarhq.com SolarNerd

    Feasibility aside, I don’t think this project should be shunned. As I have often said (elsewhere), many people have a hard time grasping electric cars. One can see the gas they put into a vehicle but electricity is still a spooky mystical force.

    I say bravo, lets give more young engineers pats on their backs because in 10 years on of those kids might shove the comments above regarding feasibility, back in the authors faces. :0

  • http://puregroove.org puregroove_org

    Wow, that’s impressive.

  • http://puregroove.org puregroove_org

    Wow, that’s impressive.

  • Pat D

    I claim to nothing on the topic. But why not concentrate on an alternator that will constantly recharge the batteries so there will be no need to plug the car in? I also recall Portable CD players being over 300 dollars for a crappy one that cost 20 dollars now, if you can find one. Good work!

  • Pat D

    I claim to nothing on the topic. But why not concentrate on an alternator that will constantly recharge the batteries so there will be no need to plug the car in? I also recall Portable CD players being over 300 dollars for a crappy one that cost 20 dollars now, if you can find one. Good work!

  • BCampos

    Most people do not drive more than 125 a day to go to work. Working on a project that suggest a new form of energy is only going to inspire new ideas and invention. I suppose that we are so narrow minded and believe that only one form of fuel is going to solve the problems. NO. We need more than one form and this is a start.

  • BCampos

    Most people do not drive more than 125 a day to go to work. Working on a project that suggest a new form of energy is only going to inspire new ideas and invention. I suppose that we are so narrow minded and believe that only one form of fuel is going to solve the problems. NO. We need more than one form and this is a start.

  • BCampos

    It would be in the best interest of the United States and its inventors to find or come up with a fuel that is native to the Americas, particularly the US, to bring back the dollar and its worth. Screw the oil companies and politics. What would the US GOV do when the resource is produced here? No more scare tactics. We are modern day slaves because of oil. I hope Mexico is the Country to invent or come up with a fuel. Maybe all of the illegals will go back.

  • BCampos

    It would be in the best interest of the United States and its inventors to find or come up with a fuel that is native to the Americas, particularly the US, to bring back the dollar and its worth. Screw the oil companies and politics. What would the US GOV do when the resource is produced here? No more scare tactics. We are modern day slaves because of oil. I hope Mexico is the Country to invent or come up with a fuel. Maybe all of the illegals will go back.

  • Nate

    Electric cars are going to save the atmosphere? There isn’t enough wind and solar available to power a country full of electric vehicles, we don’t seem to be willing to build new nuclear plants, so we’re going to what? burn more coal to avoid burning gas? brilliant.

  • Nate

    Electric cars are going to save the atmosphere? There isn’t enough wind and solar available to power a country full of electric vehicles, we don’t seem to be willing to build new nuclear plants, so we’re going to what? burn more coal to avoid burning gas? brilliant.

  • http://www.2012chevycruze.org/ JoeyScheavone

    Consider that and electric SUV would be powered by lithium ion batteries like a sedan.

    I would probably stick with a sedan as I wouldn’t need anything bigger.

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