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Published on July 17th, 2009 | by Susan Kraemer

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Another Day, Another Humungous Renewable Funding Announcement from DOE

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Recovery Act Announcement: DOE Announces Recovery Act Funding of up to $85 million for Algal and Advanced Biofuels

For big fans of renewable energy like me, these are just halyon days, indeed. Hardly have I finished reading that wind is to get a huge jolt from the new DOE, but today, even more huge funding is announced for biofuels development.

It’s almost enough to make you think that maybe we are not too stupid to survive, after all! Yay, us!

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $85 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to develop algae-based biofuels and advanced (yet infrastructure-compatible) biofuels.

DOE press release for the details:

“The DOE is seeking to bring together leading scientists and engineers from universities, private industry, and government to develop new methods to bring new biofuels to market in an accelerated timeframe.

The partnerships will enable cross-fertilization between multiple disciplines and provide the breadth of expertise necessary to develop new technologies advanced biofuels that can be used in today’s fueling infrastructure such as green aviation fuels, green gasoline, and green diesel‬‪ from a variety of biomass feedstocks.

Partnerships may include leading scientists and engineers from universities, private industry, and government, and engage end users and other field experts such as utility specialists and aquaculturists. Effective collaborations will target an accelerated timeframe to bring new biofuels to market.

DOE expects to select two to three partnerships and fund projects over three years. Today’s Funding Opportunity Announcement targets two crucial areas:

  • Algal Biofuels R&D – The primary objective of this topic area is to develop cost-effective algae-based biofuels that are competitive with traditional petroleum-based fuels.
  • Advanced, Infrastructure-Compatible Biofuels R&D is focused on enabling cost-effective conversion of biomass to advanced biofuels other than cellulosic ethanol, with particular focus on bio-based hydrocarbon fuels such as green gasoline and green diesel. Such fuels could be transported and sold using today’s existing fueling infrastructure.”

News via the DOE

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About the Author

writes at CleanTechnica, CSP-Today, PV-Insider , SmartGridUpdate, and GreenProphet. She has also been published at Ecoseed, NRDC OnEarth, MatterNetwork, Celsius, EnergyNow, and Scientific American. As a former serial entrepreneur in product design, Susan brings an innovator's perspective on inventing a carbon-constrained civilization: If necessity is the mother of invention, solving climate change is the mother of all necessities! As a lover of history and sci-fi, she enjoys chronicling the strange future we are creating in these interesting times.    Follow Susan on Twitter @dotcommodity.



  • http://www.dieselgreenfuels.com Jason Burroughs

    Funny how they don’t mention biodiesel. A shame that biodiesel can not be “transported and sold with today’s existing infrastructure”.

    As much as we all want biodiesel to succeed, the sad reality is that it doesn’t meet D975 (the diesel standard). My humble opinion is that biodiesel will be a footnote in the history of mass transportation fuels – not because it’s a bad fuel, but because it can’t scale to where we need it to.

    Watch my blog at http://www.biodieselsmarter.com/blog for an upcoming report titled “Have we hit ‘Peak Biodiesel'”.

  • http://www.dieselgreenfuels.com Jason Burroughs

    Funny how they don’t mention biodiesel. A shame that biodiesel can not be “transported and sold with today’s existing infrastructure”.

    As much as we all want biodiesel to succeed, the sad reality is that it doesn’t meet D975 (the diesel standard). My humble opinion is that biodiesel will be a footnote in the history of mass transportation fuels – not because it’s a bad fuel, but because it can’t scale to where we need it to.

    Watch my blog at http://www.biodieselsmarter.com/blog for an upcoming report titled “Have we hit ‘Peak Biodiesel'”.

  • http://www.dieselgreenfuels.com Jason Burroughs

    Funny how they don’t mention biodiesel. A shame that biodiesel can not be “transported and sold with today’s existing infrastructure”.

    As much as we all want biodiesel to succeed, the sad reality is that it doesn’t meet D975 (the diesel standard). My humble opinion is that biodiesel will be a footnote in the history of mass transportation fuels – not because it’s a bad fuel, but because it can’t scale to where we need it to.

    Watch my blog at http://www.biodieselsmarter.com/blog for an upcoming report titled “Have we hit ‘Peak Biodiesel'”.

  • Mr. Sinister

    I suppose it doesn’t bother you that all of this “humungous” renewable funding that the new DOE is throwing around comes from massive deficit spending? Let me ask you … who’s going to give a rip about green gasoline when the credit finally runs dry and the U.S. economy is in ruin? Let the pencil pushers in Washington talk about sustainability after they’ve balanced the budget.

  • Mr. Sinister

    I suppose it doesn’t bother you that all of this “humungous” renewable funding that the new DOE is throwing around comes from massive deficit spending? Let me ask you … who’s going to give a rip about green gasoline when the credit finally runs dry and the U.S. economy is in ruin? Let the pencil pushers in Washington talk about sustainability after they’ve balanced the budget.

  • jthoske

    Sinister: exactly. What is going to happen to all of the subsidy when our governments unlimited gimmie bank finally gets closed?

    I am interested to see the future of all subsidized “green” technologies, to see if they are really sustainable past the day of government support.

    I am pretty pessimistic, I guess- because I have a feeling the banking industry fiasco becoming more prevelant. Greedy unregulated business practices.

  • jthoske

    Sinister: exactly. What is going to happen to all of the subsidy when our governments unlimited gimmie bank finally gets closed?

    I am interested to see the future of all subsidized “green” technologies, to see if they are really sustainable past the day of government support.

    I am pretty pessimistic, I guess- because I have a feeling the banking industry fiasco becoming more prevelant. Greedy unregulated business practices.

  • jthoske

    Sinister: exactly. What is going to happen to all of the subsidy when our governments unlimited gimmie bank finally gets closed?

    I am interested to see the future of all subsidized “green” technologies, to see if they are really sustainable past the day of government support.

    I am pretty pessimistic, I guess- because I have a feeling the banking industry fiasco becoming more prevelant. Greedy unregulated business practices.

  • Tim Cleland

    “Funny how they don’t mention biodiesel. ”

    Isn’t “green diesel” a synonym for biodiesel? I assumed it was.

  • Tim Cleland

    “Funny how they don’t mention biodiesel. ”

    Isn’t “green diesel” a synonym for biodiesel? I assumed it was.

  • Aureon Kwolek

    To Mr. S:

    Our yearly Trade Deficit runs about $750 Billion a year, and about $500 Billion of that is because we import almost 70% of our crude oil. That $500 Billion we spend every year to import Foreign Oil is paid for with Debt Instruments – which are added to the National Debt. We pay revolving interest on Imported Oil, and it will never be paid-off, as long as we continue deficit spending. The interest we pay on the National Debt takes a big bite out of tax revenues that could be put to more constructive uses.

    The DOE is making an investment in our future. This is worthwhile because it will help us replace our deficit spending on imported oil with domestically produced fuels that stimulate our economy. These fuels may be a combination of biofuels and synthetic drop-in fuels derived from waste, algae, and biomass.

    Take your pick – You either deficit spend perpetually, by paying for imported oil with debt instruments, or you deficit spend temporarily, by investing in alternative domestic fuels that create jobs here at home.

    It will ruin us if we do nothing and stay 70% addicted to imported oil, which adds Half a Trillion Dollars a year to the National Debt.

  • Aureon Kwolek

    To Mr. S:

    Our yearly Trade Deficit runs about $750 Billion a year, and about $500 Billion of that is because we import almost 70% of our crude oil. That $500 Billion we spend every year to import Foreign Oil is paid for with Debt Instruments – which are added to the National Debt. We pay revolving interest on Imported Oil, and it will never be paid-off, as long as we continue deficit spending. The interest we pay on the National Debt takes a big bite out of tax revenues that could be put to more constructive uses.

    The DOE is making an investment in our future. This is worthwhile because it will help us replace our deficit spending on imported oil with domestically produced fuels that stimulate our economy. These fuels may be a combination of biofuels and synthetic drop-in fuels derived from waste, algae, and biomass.

    Take your pick – You either deficit spend perpetually, by paying for imported oil with debt instruments, or you deficit spend temporarily, by investing in alternative domestic fuels that create jobs here at home.

    It will ruin us if we do nothing and stay 70% addicted to imported oil, which adds Half a Trillion Dollars a year to the National Debt.

  • Aureon Kwolek

    To Mr. S:

    Our yearly Trade Deficit runs about $750 Billion a year, and about $500 Billion of that is because we import almost 70% of our crude oil. That $500 Billion we spend every year to import Foreign Oil is paid for with Debt Instruments – which are added to the National Debt. We pay revolving interest on Imported Oil, and it will never be paid-off, as long as we continue deficit spending. The interest we pay on the National Debt takes a big bite out of tax revenues that could be put to more constructive uses.

    The DOE is making an investment in our future. This is worthwhile because it will help us replace our deficit spending on imported oil with domestically produced fuels that stimulate our economy. These fuels may be a combination of biofuels and synthetic drop-in fuels derived from waste, algae, and biomass.

    Take your pick – You either deficit spend perpetually, by paying for imported oil with debt instruments, or you deficit spend temporarily, by investing in alternative domestic fuels that create jobs here at home.

    It will ruin us if we do nothing and stay 70% addicted to imported oil, which adds Half a Trillion Dollars a year to the National Debt.

  • http://dotcommodity.blogspot.com Susan Kraemer

    What Aureon said!

  • http://dotcommodity.blogspot.com Susan Kraemer

    What Aureon said!

  • http://dotcommodity.blogspot.com Susan Kraemer

    What Aureon said!

  • ken bosar

    To put things in perspective, this is a day’s worth of money we spend in Iraq, and is only 25 cents per person in the US. We have to make the necessary sacrifices if we are going to solve our energy and climate change issues. We must lose our selfishness.

  • ken bosar

    To put things in perspective, this is a day’s worth of money we spend in Iraq, and is only 25 cents per person in the US. We have to make the necessary sacrifices if we are going to solve our energy and climate change issues. We must lose our selfishness.

  • ken bosar

    To put things in perspective, this is a day’s worth of money we spend in Iraq, and is only 25 cents per person in the US. We have to make the necessary sacrifices if we are going to solve our energy and climate change issues. We must lose our selfishness.

  • http://greenoptions.com/author/susan Susan Kraemer

    Ken, I think its less than a day: we spend $12 Billion a month in Iraq…so its more like what a few hours costs in Iraq

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/03/10/studies-iraq-costs-us-12b_n_90694.html

  • http://greenoptions.com/author/susan Susan Kraemer

    Ken, I think its less than a day: we spend $12 Billion a month in Iraq…so its more like what a few hours costs in Iraq

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/03/10/studies-iraq-costs-us-12b_n_90694.html

  • Uncle B

    Dearest American friends! We are heavily engaged in Afghanistan,on behalf (hidden half) of Halliburton et al., (Saudi Princes, OPEC, Uber-rich of Europe and Asia) as “Soldiers of Fortune” or mercenaries to get at Turkmenistan’s oil and oil beyond that, in a huge basin there! China has already laid claim to this oil! When the pipeline, planned to go from Turkmenistan, down Afghanistan, across the Arab plains, through Israel, Across the Mediterranean, Atlantic oceans, and into New York harbor, the real war, war with China will break out! WWIV, the war to follow that American aggression, will be fought with bows and arrows, at dump-sites of destroyed cities and towns across the once mighty U.S.A. for scraps of insulation and broke boards for the survival of a few nuked out stragglers! your fabulous “American Dream” od Amana stoves in McMansion houses with SUV’s in the driveways and a thirty hour work week will evaporate in the nuclear destruction of your very existence, and China will assure that! The entire Mighty and infallible U.S.S.R. fell apart for lesser reasons, and without foes! P.S. China owns and operated the U.S.A. as is and has recently turned down Obama’s overtures for Trillions of dollars in loans, after Steven Geithner made an ass of himself in his speech in Beijing! Caution, China walks quietly but carries a very very big stick indeed!

  • Uncle B

    Dearest American friends! We are heavily engaged in Afghanistan,on behalf (hidden half) of Halliburton et al., (Saudi Princes, OPEC, Uber-rich of Europe and Asia) as “Soldiers of Fortune” or mercenaries to get at Turkmenistan’s oil and oil beyond that, in a huge basin there! China has already laid claim to this oil! When the pipeline, planned to go from Turkmenistan, down Afghanistan, across the Arab plains, through Israel, Across the Mediterranean, Atlantic oceans, and into New York harbor, the real war, war with China will break out! WWIV, the war to follow that American aggression, will be fought with bows and arrows, at dump-sites of destroyed cities and towns across the once mighty U.S.A. for scraps of insulation and broke boards for the survival of a few nuked out stragglers! your fabulous “American Dream” od Amana stoves in McMansion houses with SUV’s in the driveways and a thirty hour work week will evaporate in the nuclear destruction of your very existence, and China will assure that! The entire Mighty and infallible U.S.S.R. fell apart for lesser reasons, and without foes! P.S. China owns and operated the U.S.A. as is and has recently turned down Obama’s overtures for Trillions of dollars in loans, after Steven Geithner made an ass of himself in his speech in Beijing! Caution, China walks quietly but carries a very very big stick indeed!

  • http://mogblog.org mog

    As usual, there is no need to panic. If you have followed politics for a while, you will recall that the end is always near, tomorrow is always the last day you will live free.

    The China threat is real, but not immediate. China has followed the same strategy for decades, and it is leading them to victory, slowly but surely. Their strategy is to have others do their fighting, as in Korea, as in Viet Nam, as in Irag, as in Venezuela.

    At the same time they quietly support and encourage others to wage war on the west, they subvert our own educational, political and news apparatus, which love to tell us all what a wonderful nation and ally China is [new! improved! capitalist!] trying to gloss over Falun Gong, Tieneman square, and weapon sales to the world.

    I doubt we will go to war with China over oil. More likely we will build the wells and refineries over there only to have them become the property of a China-allied Turkmenistan

  • http://mogblog.org mog

    As usual, there is no need to panic. If you have followed politics for a while, you will recall that the end is always near, tomorrow is always the last day you will live free.

    The China threat is real, but not immediate. China has followed the same strategy for decades, and it is leading them to victory, slowly but surely. Their strategy is to have others do their fighting, as in Korea, as in Viet Nam, as in Irag, as in Venezuela.

    At the same time they quietly support and encourage others to wage war on the west, they subvert our own educational, political and news apparatus, which love to tell us all what a wonderful nation and ally China is [new! improved! capitalist!] trying to gloss over Falun Gong, Tieneman square, and weapon sales to the world.

    I doubt we will go to war with China over oil. More likely we will build the wells and refineries over there only to have them become the property of a China-allied Turkmenistan

  • http://www.biogreenclean.com April

    Reality check, why did it take for a war to begin and for a lot of young American soldiers to die before significant research has to be done on alternative fuel? What were people waiting for? What was the government waiting for?

  • http://www.biogreenclean.com April

    Reality check, why did it take for a war to begin and for a lot of young American soldiers to die before significant research has to be done on alternative fuel? What were people waiting for? What was the government waiting for?

  • http://www.biogreenclean.com April

    Reality check, why did it take for a war to begin and for a lot of young American soldiers to die before significant research has to be done on alternative fuel? What were people waiting for? What was the government waiting for?

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