Fuel economy no image

Published on March 24th, 2009 | by Andrew Williams

40

Is New Tata Nano the World’s Most Fuel Efficient Petrol Car?

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Struggling Indian car company Tata Motors has announced the commercial launch of the Tata Nano, the most fuel-efficient petrol-driven car in India, and quite possibly the world.

The Tata Nano, keenly anticipated across India since its unveiling early last year, is capable of an incredible 23.6km/litre (55.5 mpg) and ultra-low carbon emissions of 101 g/km, one of the lowest in India. Oh, and with prices starting at about 100,000 rupees ($2,050), it’s also the cheapest car in the world (more pics after the jump).

Speaking at the launch, Chairman Ratan N. Tata said, “The Nano represents the spirit of breaking conventional barriers. It is to the credit of the team at Tata Motors that a car once thought impossible by the world is now a reality. I hope it will provide safe, affordable, four-wheel transportation to families who till now have not been able to own a car.

The four-seater Nano is powered by a 2-cylinder engine capable of delivering a top speed of 105 km/h (65 mph), more than enough for many of India’s congested cities.

The cars, on display across India from April 1st, are currently being manufactured at the company’s Pantnagar plant in Uttarakhand in limited numbers. A new dedicated plant, at Sanand in Gujarat, will be ready in 2010 with an annualised capacity of 350,000 cars.

Writer’s Note – Tata are claiming that the Tata Nano will become the most fuel efficient car in India. I’d be really interested to hear your comments on whether or not it will also be the most efficient in the world, or whether you’re aware of any more frugal cars in the US or elsewhere?

Image Credit – Tata Motors


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About the Author

is a writer and freelance journalist specialising in sustainability and green issues. He lives in Cardiff, Wales.



  • 404Lance

    TaTa motors is also the same company that was supposed to put 6,000 “air cars” on the streets of India back in 2008. I haven’t verified that this has happened yet, but if so, then wouldn’t that be the most fuel efficient car in India? However, if they are comparing to cars that are soley petro-based, they may be correct. I don’t see the Nano doing so good here with the 65MPH cap, especially since all the safety and comfort regulations would take the car up to closer to a $10K price tag I’m sure.

  • 404Lance

    TaTa motors is also the same company that was supposed to put 6,000 “air cars” on the streets of India back in 2008. I haven’t verified that this has happened yet, but if so, then wouldn’t that be the most fuel efficient car in India? However, if they are comparing to cars that are soley petro-based, they may be correct. I don’t see the Nano doing so good here with the 65MPH cap, especially since all the safety and comfort regulations would take the car up to closer to a $10K price tag I’m sure.

  • 404Lance

    TaTa motors is also the same company that was supposed to put 6,000 “air cars” on the streets of India back in 2008. I haven’t verified that this has happened yet, but if so, then wouldn’t that be the most fuel efficient car in India? However, if they are comparing to cars that are soley petro-based, they may be correct. I don’t see the Nano doing so good here with the 65MPH cap, especially since all the safety and comfort regulations would take the car up to closer to a $10K price tag I’m sure.

  • onesojourner

    This car would do great hear if they can keep the price down below 3-4k. Give me a 3 year 50k mile warranty and I’m sold.

  • onesojourner

    This car would do great hear if they can keep the price down below 3-4k. Give me a 3 year 50k mile warranty and I’m sold.

  • onesojourner

    This car would do great hear if they can keep the price down below 3-4k. Give me a 3 year 50k mile warranty and I’m sold.

  • Matt

    Would that even pass safety standards for the US?

    Golf carts don’t count as cars. While it may be great for headlines, 55.5 mpg isn’t that impressive given the weight of the car. Lets see 60mpg in a car that weighs over 3000lbs and has over 200 HP.

  • Matt

    Would that even pass safety standards for the US?

    Golf carts don’t count as cars. While it may be great for headlines, 55.5 mpg isn’t that impressive given the weight of the car. Lets see 60mpg in a car that weighs over 3000lbs and has over 200 HP.

  • Matt

    Would that even pass safety standards for the US?

    Golf carts don’t count as cars. While it may be great for headlines, 55.5 mpg isn’t that impressive given the weight of the car. Lets see 60mpg in a car that weighs over 3000lbs and has over 200 HP.

  • Max

    I think if it came to America it would only have one car to compete against and that’s the Smart Car (MSRP $11K-16K). As long as the price stays a couple thousand less than that the Nano would do quite well in America, barring the safety modifications. More info on the story here, http://www.newsy.com/videos/world_s_cheapest_car_hits_market/

  • Max

    I think if it came to America it would only have one car to compete against and that’s the Smart Car (MSRP $11K-16K). As long as the price stays a couple thousand less than that the Nano would do quite well in America, barring the safety modifications. More info on the story here, http://www.newsy.com/videos/world_s_cheapest_car_hits_market/

  • Max

    I think if it came to America it would only have one car to compete against and that’s the Smart Car (MSRP $11K-16K). As long as the price stays a couple thousand less than that the Nano would do quite well in America, barring the safety modifications. More info on the story here, http://www.newsy.com/videos/world_s_cheapest_car_hits_market/

  • http://bradhicks.livejournal.com/ J. Brad Hicks

    What blows my mind is how little progress we’ve made. 55 MPG is no better than the rating on the stick shift version of my old 1989 Geo Metro convertible. All these years we’ve been studying electronic fuel ignition and other means of improving gasoline engine efficiency, and we still can’t do any better than we were doing 20 years ago? Did we completely waste those 20 years?

  • http://bradhicks.livejournal.com/ J. Brad Hicks

    What blows my mind is how little progress we’ve made. 55 MPG is no better than the rating on the stick shift version of my old 1989 Geo Metro convertible. All these years we’ve been studying electronic fuel ignition and other means of improving gasoline engine efficiency, and we still can’t do any better than we were doing 20 years ago? Did we completely waste those 20 years?

  • planetautomatic

    a few facts /-

    1) “Struggling…”

    Its not only TATAs whos facing the deep turn in the auto industry. – every major auto car maker is(Ford,GM,Chrysler,dodge u name it.In fact the US layoffs are stupendous compared to the asian market.

    2) The whole auto industry GLOBALLY is in turmoil.

    Thats why a lot of things promised in the US and Asia could not be delivered.

    But the NANO HAS- with all the recession, nay-sayers , eco-alarmists, Its here to stay and lead.

    The NANO has proven to be the new benchmark and copy-cats are trying to fill in a whole new new segment in the industry.

    3) Simple is beautiful. Thats what the TATA Nano teaches and preaches. Its spartan ingenuity gets the job done to make millions mobile- by shedding “excesses” and re-thinking “Needs”.

    4) Ratan Tata is not a madoff or an auto-pyramd scheme. Hes an old schooler like Henry Ford .

    Thats sheer guts and perseverence .

    5)Its not hype like a lot of what u see today.

    Its a car – that works and is in touch with what Indians, Africans and any developing nations people aspire for.

  • planetautomatic

    a few facts /-

    1) “Struggling…”

    Its not only TATAs whos facing the deep turn in the auto industry. – every major auto car maker is(Ford,GM,Chrysler,dodge u name it.In fact the US layoffs are stupendous compared to the asian market.

    2) The whole auto industry GLOBALLY is in turmoil.

    Thats why a lot of things promised in the US and Asia could not be delivered.

    But the NANO HAS- with all the recession, nay-sayers , eco-alarmists, Its here to stay and lead.

    The NANO has proven to be the new benchmark and copy-cats are trying to fill in a whole new new segment in the industry.

    3) Simple is beautiful. Thats what the TATA Nano teaches and preaches. Its spartan ingenuity gets the job done to make millions mobile- by shedding “excesses” and re-thinking “Needs”.

    4) Ratan Tata is not a madoff or an auto-pyramd scheme. Hes an old schooler like Henry Ford .

    Thats sheer guts and perseverence .

    5)Its not hype like a lot of what u see today.

    Its a car – that works and is in touch with what Indians, Africans and any developing nations people aspire for.

  • planetautomatic

    a few facts /-

    1) “Struggling…”

    Its not only TATAs whos facing the deep turn in the auto industry. – every major auto car maker is(Ford,GM,Chrysler,dodge u name it.In fact the US layoffs are stupendous compared to the asian market.

    2) The whole auto industry GLOBALLY is in turmoil.

    Thats why a lot of things promised in the US and Asia could not be delivered.

    But the NANO HAS- with all the recession, nay-sayers , eco-alarmists, Its here to stay and lead.

    The NANO has proven to be the new benchmark and copy-cats are trying to fill in a whole new new segment in the industry.

    3) Simple is beautiful. Thats what the TATA Nano teaches and preaches. Its spartan ingenuity gets the job done to make millions mobile- by shedding “excesses” and re-thinking “Needs”.

    4) Ratan Tata is not a madoff or an auto-pyramd scheme. Hes an old schooler like Henry Ford .

    Thats sheer guts and perseverence .

    5)Its not hype like a lot of what u see today.

    Its a car – that works and is in touch with what Indians, Africans and any developing nations people aspire for.

  • Logan

    In the book “Two Billion Cars,” the authors say that in the past twenty years, fuel efficiency has stayed roughly the same. Technology has advanced, but instead of making the cars more fuel efficient, the cars have become more powerful while keeping the same mpg.

    That is why we aren’t doing any better than we were twenty years ago. There was no financial incentive to increase fuel economy. Consumers wanted more power.

    Here’s to hoping that changes. Can anyone actually say that there is a logical benefit to owning a V8?

  • Logan

    In the book “Two Billion Cars,” the authors say that in the past twenty years, fuel efficiency has stayed roughly the same. Technology has advanced, but instead of making the cars more fuel efficient, the cars have become more powerful while keeping the same mpg.

    That is why we aren’t doing any better than we were twenty years ago. There was no financial incentive to increase fuel economy. Consumers wanted more power.

    Here’s to hoping that changes. Can anyone actually say that there is a logical benefit to owning a V8?

  • Logan

    In the book “Two Billion Cars,” the authors say that in the past twenty years, fuel efficiency has stayed roughly the same. Technology has advanced, but instead of making the cars more fuel efficient, the cars have become more powerful while keeping the same mpg.

    That is why we aren’t doing any better than we were twenty years ago. There was no financial incentive to increase fuel economy. Consumers wanted more power.

    Here’s to hoping that changes. Can anyone actually say that there is a logical benefit to owning a V8?

  • CNCMike

    Agree with the comments about the mileage. In 1977 my future ex wife bought a Datsun B210 and averaged 51 MPG without trying. This thing(and the Smart Car) should get at least 70 to 80 mpg to be the least bit impressive.

  • CNCMike

    Agree with the comments about the mileage. In 1977 my future ex wife bought a Datsun B210 and averaged 51 MPG without trying. This thing(and the Smart Car) should get at least 70 to 80 mpg to be the least bit impressive.

  • CNCMike

    Agree with the comments about the mileage. In 1977 my future ex wife bought a Datsun B210 and averaged 51 MPG without trying. This thing(and the Smart Car) should get at least 70 to 80 mpg to be the least bit impressive.

  • Tim Cleland

    “What blows my mind is how little progress we’ve made. 55 MPG is no better than the rating on the stick shift version of my old 1989 Geo Metro convertible. All these years we’ve been studying electronic fuel ignition and other means of improving gasoline engine efficiency, and we still can’t do any better than we were doing 20 years ago? Did we completely waste those 20 years?”

    Two points. 1) The Geo Metro, even back then, cost $6-7K new. (nothing against Metros…I’ve had two) 2) This car is so cheap, I bet the engine and transmission are pretty low on the technology totem-pole. Stick in an expensive engine with variable valve timing, 4-valves-per-cyl, direct-injection, and a more expensive 6-spd (or continuously variable) transmission and I bet you’d get close to 70 mpg. Of course, you’ll pay a lot more for it too.

  • Tim Cleland

    “What blows my mind is how little progress we’ve made. 55 MPG is no better than the rating on the stick shift version of my old 1989 Geo Metro convertible. All these years we’ve been studying electronic fuel ignition and other means of improving gasoline engine efficiency, and we still can’t do any better than we were doing 20 years ago? Did we completely waste those 20 years?”

    Two points. 1) The Geo Metro, even back then, cost $6-7K new. (nothing against Metros…I’ve had two) 2) This car is so cheap, I bet the engine and transmission are pretty low on the technology totem-pole. Stick in an expensive engine with variable valve timing, 4-valves-per-cyl, direct-injection, and a more expensive 6-spd (or continuously variable) transmission and I bet you’d get close to 70 mpg. Of course, you’ll pay a lot more for it too.

  • Tim Cleland

    “What blows my mind is how little progress we’ve made. 55 MPG is no better than the rating on the stick shift version of my old 1989 Geo Metro convertible. All these years we’ve been studying electronic fuel ignition and other means of improving gasoline engine efficiency, and we still can’t do any better than we were doing 20 years ago? Did we completely waste those 20 years?”

    Two points. 1) The Geo Metro, even back then, cost $6-7K new. (nothing against Metros…I’ve had two) 2) This car is so cheap, I bet the engine and transmission are pretty low on the technology totem-pole. Stick in an expensive engine with variable valve timing, 4-valves-per-cyl, direct-injection, and a more expensive 6-spd (or continuously variable) transmission and I bet you’d get close to 70 mpg. Of course, you’ll pay a lot more for it too.

  • Sunil Kapur

    Today was the landmark day for booking of nano- the prizecash car of india which ended on happy note but not for tata management group. when nano project was announced it faced many hurdles but tata management company took the project as a challenge and announce that it would be completed in a year. it had to shift its base and completed all the formalities in time. it faced much more difficulties like global recession and militant attacks on other tata projects. tata management hold all the hurdles and adopted one mantra “go set go” and completed its promise. the D day came and car was put to booking all over the country. the booking stopped today and intial report published indicated in all the papers as less than expected by tata group. yes, by now tata management must had analysed the reason for its short fall. I had an oppurtunity to view and sit in the nano car in chandigarh. My first impression was far from expectation. i would suggest some modification before u again extend the booking all over india as per indications.

    1) first and foremost is while sitting in driver seat one feels perturbed and not safe to drive the car. the front view is not safe. the front oval shape of the car blocks the view of the road in front. in view of large scale traffic in city one should feel safe to travel.

    2)absence of dicky in the car is also disvantage to people who are to undertake short jourbeys from their house.

    though finance was no problem yet the low booking was due to these important factors which have led to less than expectations. this need immediate modification if the booking has to be extended.

  • Sunil Kapur

    Today was the landmark day for booking of nano- the prizecash car of india which ended on happy note but not for tata management group. when nano project was announced it faced many hurdles but tata management company took the project as a challenge and announce that it would be completed in a year. it had to shift its base and completed all the formalities in time. it faced much more difficulties like global recession and militant attacks on other tata projects. tata management hold all the hurdles and adopted one mantra “go set go” and completed its promise. the D day came and car was put to booking all over the country. the booking stopped today and intial report published indicated in all the papers as less than expected by tata group. yes, by now tata management must had analysed the reason for its short fall. I had an oppurtunity to view and sit in the nano car in chandigarh. My first impression was far from expectation. i would suggest some modification before u again extend the booking all over india as per indications.

    1) first and foremost is while sitting in driver seat one feels perturbed and not safe to drive the car. the front view is not safe. the front oval shape of the car blocks the view of the road in front. in view of large scale traffic in city one should feel safe to travel.

    2)absence of dicky in the car is also disvantage to people who are to undertake short jourbeys from their house.

    though finance was no problem yet the low booking was due to these important factors which have led to less than expectations. this need immediate modification if the booking has to be extended.

  • Eugene

    I agree, 55 MPG is pretty low for such a small car.

    Look what Mr. Goodwin has accomplished using off-the-

    shelf hardware anybody can obtain:

    http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/120/motorhead-messiah.html?page=0%2C4

    “Johnathan Goodwin can get 100 mpg out of a Lincoln Continental, cut emissions by 80%, and double the horsepower. Does the car business have the guts to follow him?

    We’re hunched on the floor of Goodwin’s gleaming workshop in Wichita, Kansas, surrounded by the shards of a wooden packing crate. Inside the wreckage sits his latest toy–a 1985-issue turbine engine originally designed for the military. It can spin at a blistering 60,000 rpm and burn almost any fuel. And Goodwin has some startling plans for this esoteric piece of hardware: He’s going to use it to create the most fuel-efficient Hummer in history.

    Goodwin leads me over to a red 2005 H3 Hummer that’s up on jacks, its mechanicals removed. He aims to use the turbine to turn the Hummer into a tricked-out electric hybrid. Like most hybrids, it’ll have two engines, including an electric motor. But in this case, the second will be the turbine, Goodwin’s secret ingredient. Whenever the truck’s juice runs low, the turbine will roar into action for a few seconds, powering a generator with such gusto that it’ll recharge a set of “supercapacitor” batteries in seconds. This means the H3′s electric motor will be able to perform awesome feats of acceleration and power over and over again, like a Prius on steroids. What’s more, the turbine will burn biodiesel, a renewable fuel with much lower emissions than normal diesel; a hydrogen-injection system will then cut those low emissions in half. And when it’s time to fill the tank, he’ll be able to just pull up to the back of a diner and dump in its excess french-fry grease–as he does with his many other Hummers. Oh, yeah, he adds, the horsepower will double–from 300 to 600.

    “Conservatively,” Goodwin muses, scratching his chin, “it’ll get 60 miles to the gallon. With 2,000 foot-pounds of torque. You’ll be able to smoke the tires. And it’s going to be superefficient.”

    He laughs. “Think about it: a 5,000-pound vehicle that gets 60 miles to the gallon and does zero to 60 in five seconds!”

    This is the sort of work that’s making Goodwin famous in the world of underground car modders. He is a virtuoso of fuel economy. He takes the hugest American cars on the road and rejiggers them to get up to quadruple their normal mileage and burn low-emission renewable fuels grown on U.S. soil–all while doubling their horsepower. The result thrills eco-evangelists and red-meat Americans alike: a vehicle that’s simultaneously green and mean. And word’s getting out. In the corner of his office sits Arnold Schwarzenegger’s 1987 Jeep Wagoneer, which Goodwin is converting to biodiesel; soon, Neil Young will be shipping him a 1960 Lincoln Continental to transform into a biodiesel–electric hybrid.

    His target for Young’s car? One hundred miles per gallon.

    This is more than a mere American Chopper–style makeover. Goodwin’s experiments point to a radically cleaner and cheaper future for the American car. The numbers are simple: With a $5,000 bolt-on kit he co-engineered–the poor man’s version of a Goodwin conversion–he can immediately transform any diesel vehicle to burn 50% less fuel and produce 80% fewer emissions. On a full-size gas-guzzler, he figures the kit earns its money back in about a year–or, on a regular car, two–while hitting an emissions target from the outset that’s more stringent than any regulation we’re likely to see in our lifetime. “Johnathan’s in a league of his own,” says Martin Tobias, CEO of Imperium Renewables, the nation’s largest producer of biodiesel. “Nobody out there is doing experiments like he is.”

    Goodwin’s feats of engineering have become gradually more visible over the past year. Last summer, Imperium Renewables contacted MTV’s show Pimp My Ride about creating an Earth Day special in which Goodwin would convert a muscle car to run on biodiesel. The show chose a ’65 Chevy Impala, and when the conversion was done, he’d doubled its mileage to 25 mpg and increased its pull from 250 to 800 horsepower. As a stunt, MTV drag-raced the Impala against a Lamborghini on California’s Pomona Raceway. “The Impala blew the Lamborghini away,” says Kevin Kluemper, the lead calibration engineer for GM’s Allison transmission unit, who’d flown down to help with the conversion. Schwarzenegger, who was on the set that day, asked Goodwin on the spot to convert his Wagoneer to biodiesel.

    … ”

    Back to me.

    Be sure to read the entire 6-page article and keep in mind

    he is using standard off-the-shelf parts AVAILABLE NOW!!!

    If GM was smart, they would hire Mr. Johnathan Goodwin

    to show them HOW TO DO WHAT HE IS DOING!! It would bring

    America out of this depression we are in and make America

    the #1 vehicle manufacturer again AND we would NOT need to

    import Saudi oil any longer!! Plus if Goodwin’s methods

    were refined and applied to smaller vehicles, we could

    see even HIGHER MPG figures without making them out of

    beer-can metal and yet have decent (practical & safer)

    acceleration.

    Have a Great Day!! :)

  • Eugene

    I agree, 55 MPG is pretty low for such a small car.

    Look what Mr. Goodwin has accomplished using off-the-

    shelf hardware anybody can obtain:

    http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/120/motorhead-messiah.html?page=0%2C4

    “Johnathan Goodwin can get 100 mpg out of a Lincoln Continental, cut emissions by 80%, and double the horsepower. Does the car business have the guts to follow him?

    We’re hunched on the floor of Goodwin’s gleaming workshop in Wichita, Kansas, surrounded by the shards of a wooden packing crate. Inside the wreckage sits his latest toy–a 1985-issue turbine engine originally designed for the military. It can spin at a blistering 60,000 rpm and burn almost any fuel. And Goodwin has some startling plans for this esoteric piece of hardware: He’s going to use it to create the most fuel-efficient Hummer in history.

    Goodwin leads me over to a red 2005 H3 Hummer that’s up on jacks, its mechanicals removed. He aims to use the turbine to turn the Hummer into a tricked-out electric hybrid. Like most hybrids, it’ll have two engines, including an electric motor. But in this case, the second will be the turbine, Goodwin’s secret ingredient. Whenever the truck’s juice runs low, the turbine will roar into action for a few seconds, powering a generator with such gusto that it’ll recharge a set of “supercapacitor” batteries in seconds. This means the H3′s electric motor will be able to perform awesome feats of acceleration and power over and over again, like a Prius on steroids. What’s more, the turbine will burn biodiesel, a renewable fuel with much lower emissions than normal diesel; a hydrogen-injection system will then cut those low emissions in half. And when it’s time to fill the tank, he’ll be able to just pull up to the back of a diner and dump in its excess french-fry grease–as he does with his many other Hummers. Oh, yeah, he adds, the horsepower will double–from 300 to 600.

    “Conservatively,” Goodwin muses, scratching his chin, “it’ll get 60 miles to the gallon. With 2,000 foot-pounds of torque. You’ll be able to smoke the tires. And it’s going to be superefficient.”

    He laughs. “Think about it: a 5,000-pound vehicle that gets 60 miles to the gallon and does zero to 60 in five seconds!”

    This is the sort of work that’s making Goodwin famous in the world of underground car modders. He is a virtuoso of fuel economy. He takes the hugest American cars on the road and rejiggers them to get up to quadruple their normal mileage and burn low-emission renewable fuels grown on U.S. soil–all while doubling their horsepower. The result thrills eco-evangelists and red-meat Americans alike: a vehicle that’s simultaneously green and mean. And word’s getting out. In the corner of his office sits Arnold Schwarzenegger’s 1987 Jeep Wagoneer, which Goodwin is converting to biodiesel; soon, Neil Young will be shipping him a 1960 Lincoln Continental to transform into a biodiesel–electric hybrid.

    His target for Young’s car? One hundred miles per gallon.

    This is more than a mere American Chopper–style makeover. Goodwin’s experiments point to a radically cleaner and cheaper future for the American car. The numbers are simple: With a $5,000 bolt-on kit he co-engineered–the poor man’s version of a Goodwin conversion–he can immediately transform any diesel vehicle to burn 50% less fuel and produce 80% fewer emissions. On a full-size gas-guzzler, he figures the kit earns its money back in about a year–or, on a regular car, two–while hitting an emissions target from the outset that’s more stringent than any regulation we’re likely to see in our lifetime. “Johnathan’s in a league of his own,” says Martin Tobias, CEO of Imperium Renewables, the nation’s largest producer of biodiesel. “Nobody out there is doing experiments like he is.”

    Goodwin’s feats of engineering have become gradually more visible over the past year. Last summer, Imperium Renewables contacted MTV’s show Pimp My Ride about creating an Earth Day special in which Goodwin would convert a muscle car to run on biodiesel. The show chose a ’65 Chevy Impala, and when the conversion was done, he’d doubled its mileage to 25 mpg and increased its pull from 250 to 800 horsepower. As a stunt, MTV drag-raced the Impala against a Lamborghini on California’s Pomona Raceway. “The Impala blew the Lamborghini away,” says Kevin Kluemper, the lead calibration engineer for GM’s Allison transmission unit, who’d flown down to help with the conversion. Schwarzenegger, who was on the set that day, asked Goodwin on the spot to convert his Wagoneer to biodiesel.

    … ”

    Back to me.

    Be sure to read the entire 6-page article and keep in mind

    he is using standard off-the-shelf parts AVAILABLE NOW!!!

    If GM was smart, they would hire Mr. Johnathan Goodwin

    to show them HOW TO DO WHAT HE IS DOING!! It would bring

    America out of this depression we are in and make America

    the #1 vehicle manufacturer again AND we would NOT need to

    import Saudi oil any longer!! Plus if Goodwin’s methods

    were refined and applied to smaller vehicles, we could

    see even HIGHER MPG figures without making them out of

    beer-can metal and yet have decent (practical & safer)

    acceleration.

    Have a Great Day!! :)

  • Eugene

    I agree, 55 MPG is pretty low for such a small car.

    Look what Mr. Goodwin has accomplished using off-the-

    shelf hardware anybody can obtain:

    http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/120/motorhead-messiah.html?page=0%2C4

    “Johnathan Goodwin can get 100 mpg out of a Lincoln Continental, cut emissions by 80%, and double the horsepower. Does the car business have the guts to follow him?

    We’re hunched on the floor of Goodwin’s gleaming workshop in Wichita, Kansas, surrounded by the shards of a wooden packing crate. Inside the wreckage sits his latest toy–a 1985-issue turbine engine originally designed for the military. It can spin at a blistering 60,000 rpm and burn almost any fuel. And Goodwin has some startling plans for this esoteric piece of hardware: He’s going to use it to create the most fuel-efficient Hummer in history.

    Goodwin leads me over to a red 2005 H3 Hummer that’s up on jacks, its mechanicals removed. He aims to use the turbine to turn the Hummer into a tricked-out electric hybrid. Like most hybrids, it’ll have two engines, including an electric motor. But in this case, the second will be the turbine, Goodwin’s secret ingredient. Whenever the truck’s juice runs low, the turbine will roar into action for a few seconds, powering a generator with such gusto that it’ll recharge a set of “supercapacitor” batteries in seconds. This means the H3′s electric motor will be able to perform awesome feats of acceleration and power over and over again, like a Prius on steroids. What’s more, the turbine will burn biodiesel, a renewable fuel with much lower emissions than normal diesel; a hydrogen-injection system will then cut those low emissions in half. And when it’s time to fill the tank, he’ll be able to just pull up to the back of a diner and dump in its excess french-fry grease–as he does with his many other Hummers. Oh, yeah, he adds, the horsepower will double–from 300 to 600.

    “Conservatively,” Goodwin muses, scratching his chin, “it’ll get 60 miles to the gallon. With 2,000 foot-pounds of torque. You’ll be able to smoke the tires. And it’s going to be superefficient.”

    He laughs. “Think about it: a 5,000-pound vehicle that gets 60 miles to the gallon and does zero to 60 in five seconds!”

    This is the sort of work that’s making Goodwin famous in the world of underground car modders. He is a virtuoso of fuel economy. He takes the hugest American cars on the road and rejiggers them to get up to quadruple their normal mileage and burn low-emission renewable fuels grown on U.S. soil–all while doubling their horsepower. The result thrills eco-evangelists and red-meat Americans alike: a vehicle that’s simultaneously green and mean. And word’s getting out. In the corner of his office sits Arnold Schwarzenegger’s 1987 Jeep Wagoneer, which Goodwin is converting to biodiesel; soon, Neil Young will be shipping him a 1960 Lincoln Continental to transform into a biodiesel–electric hybrid.

    His target for Young’s car? One hundred miles per gallon.

    This is more than a mere American Chopper–style makeover. Goodwin’s experiments point to a radically cleaner and cheaper future for the American car. The numbers are simple: With a $5,000 bolt-on kit he co-engineered–the poor man’s version of a Goodwin conversion–he can immediately transform any diesel vehicle to burn 50% less fuel and produce 80% fewer emissions. On a full-size gas-guzzler, he figures the kit earns its money back in about a year–or, on a regular car, two–while hitting an emissions target from the outset that’s more stringent than any regulation we’re likely to see in our lifetime. “Johnathan’s in a league of his own,” says Martin Tobias, CEO of Imperium Renewables, the nation’s largest producer of biodiesel. “Nobody out there is doing experiments like he is.”

    Goodwin’s feats of engineering have become gradually more visible over the past year. Last summer, Imperium Renewables contacted MTV’s show Pimp My Ride about creating an Earth Day special in which Goodwin would convert a muscle car to run on biodiesel. The show chose a ’65 Chevy Impala, and when the conversion was done, he’d doubled its mileage to 25 mpg and increased its pull from 250 to 800 horsepower. As a stunt, MTV drag-raced the Impala against a Lamborghini on California’s Pomona Raceway. “The Impala blew the Lamborghini away,” says Kevin Kluemper, the lead calibration engineer for GM’s Allison transmission unit, who’d flown down to help with the conversion. Schwarzenegger, who was on the set that day, asked Goodwin on the spot to convert his Wagoneer to biodiesel.

    … ”

    Back to me.

    Be sure to read the entire 6-page article and keep in mind

    he is using standard off-the-shelf parts AVAILABLE NOW!!!

    If GM was smart, they would hire Mr. Johnathan Goodwin

    to show them HOW TO DO WHAT HE IS DOING!! It would bring

    America out of this depression we are in and make America

    the #1 vehicle manufacturer again AND we would NOT need to

    import Saudi oil any longer!! Plus if Goodwin’s methods

    were refined and applied to smaller vehicles, we could

    see even HIGHER MPG figures without making them out of

    beer-can metal and yet have decent (practical & safer)

    acceleration.

    Have a Great Day!! :)

  • Eugene

    I agree, 55 MPG is pretty low for such a small car.

    Look what Mr. Goodwin has accomplished using off-the-

    shelf hardware anybody can obtain:

    http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/120/motorhead-messiah.html?page=0%2C4

    “Johnathan Goodwin can get 100 mpg out of a Lincoln Continental, cut emissions by 80%, and double the horsepower. Does the car business have the guts to follow him?

    We’re hunched on the floor of Goodwin’s gleaming workshop in Wichita, Kansas, surrounded by the shards of a wooden packing crate. Inside the wreckage sits his latest toy–a 1985-issue turbine engine originally designed for the military. It can spin at a blistering 60,000 rpm and burn almost any fuel. And Goodwin has some startling plans for this esoteric piece of hardware: He’s going to use it to create the most fuel-efficient Hummer in history.

    Goodwin leads me over to a red 2005 H3 Hummer that’s up on jacks, its mechanicals removed. He aims to use the turbine to turn the Hummer into a tricked-out electric hybrid. Like most hybrids, it’ll have two engines, including an electric motor. But in this case, the second will be the turbine, Goodwin’s secret ingredient. Whenever the truck’s juice runs low, the turbine will roar into action for a few seconds, powering a generator with such gusto that it’ll recharge a set of “supercapacitor” batteries in seconds. This means the H3′s electric motor will be able to perform awesome feats of acceleration and power over and over again, like a Prius on steroids. What’s more, the turbine will burn biodiesel, a renewable fuel with much lower emissions than normal diesel; a hydrogen-injection system will then cut those low emissions in half. And when it’s time to fill the tank, he’ll be able to just pull up to the back of a diner and dump in its excess french-fry grease–as he does with his many other Hummers. Oh, yeah, he adds, the horsepower will double–from 300 to 600.

    “Conservatively,” Goodwin muses, scratching his chin, “it’ll get 60 miles to the gallon. With 2,000 foot-pounds of torque. You’ll be able to smoke the tires. And it’s going to be superefficient.”

    He laughs. “Think about it: a 5,000-pound vehicle that gets 60 miles to the gallon and does zero to 60 in five seconds!”

    This is the sort of work that’s making Goodwin famous in the world of underground car modders. He is a virtuoso of fuel economy. He takes the hugest American cars on the road and rejiggers them to get up to quadruple their normal mileage and burn low-emission renewable fuels grown on U.S. soil–all while doubling their horsepower. The result thrills eco-evangelists and red-meat Americans alike: a vehicle that’s simultaneously green and mean. And word’s getting out. In the corner of his office sits Arnold Schwarzenegger’s 1987 Jeep Wagoneer, which Goodwin is converting to biodiesel; soon, Neil Young will be shipping him a 1960 Lincoln Continental to transform into a biodiesel–electric hybrid.

    His target for Young’s car? One hundred miles per gallon.

    This is more than a mere American Chopper–style makeover. Goodwin’s experiments point to a radically cleaner and cheaper future for the American car. The numbers are simple: With a $5,000 bolt-on kit he co-engineered–the poor man’s version of a Goodwin conversion–he can immediately transform any diesel vehicle to burn 50% less fuel and produce 80% fewer emissions. On a full-size gas-guzzler, he figures the kit earns its money back in about a year–or, on a regular car, two–while hitting an emissions target from the outset that’s more stringent than any regulation we’re likely to see in our lifetime. “Johnathan’s in a league of his own,” says Martin Tobias, CEO of Imperium Renewables, the nation’s largest producer of biodiesel. “Nobody out there is doing experiments like he is.”

    Goodwin’s feats of engineering have become gradually more visible over the past year. Last summer, Imperium Renewables contacted MTV’s show Pimp My Ride about creating an Earth Day special in which Goodwin would convert a muscle car to run on biodiesel. The show chose a ’65 Chevy Impala, and when the conversion was done, he’d doubled its mileage to 25 mpg and increased its pull from 250 to 800 horsepower. As a stunt, MTV drag-raced the Impala against a Lamborghini on California’s Pomona Raceway. “The Impala blew the Lamborghini away,” says Kevin Kluemper, the lead calibration engineer for GM’s Allison transmission unit, who’d flown down to help with the conversion. Schwarzenegger, who was on the set that day, asked Goodwin on the spot to convert his Wagoneer to biodiesel.

    … ”

    Back to me.

    Be sure to read the entire 6-page article and keep in mind

    he is using standard off-the-shelf parts AVAILABLE NOW!!!

    If GM was smart, they would hire Mr. Johnathan Goodwin

    to show them HOW TO DO WHAT HE IS DOING!! It would bring

    America out of this depression we are in and make America

    the #1 vehicle manufacturer again AND we would NOT need to

    import Saudi oil any longer!! Plus if Goodwin’s methods

    were refined and applied to smaller vehicles, we could

    see even HIGHER MPG figures without making them out of

    beer-can metal and yet have decent (practical & safer)

    acceleration.

    Have a Great Day!! :)

  • Sam

    The Tata Nano is a really cool car. I watched a video about it, though, and this annoying reporter woman who is “an expert on cars” (not sarcarm; the other annoying reporter lady said it first) was going on and on about how unsafe it is because there are no airbags. Personally, I think airbags are hazards (if I crash into someone head on, do I really want a hard piece of dashboard plastic being blown into my face? no.), but ignoring that, if the majority of people on the roads in India or any country for that matter drove these Nanos or other small cars, would they still be unsafe? If two Nanos crash into each other, will the drivers be in danger? Marginally, but not as badly as everyone says. So instead of encouraging people to stick to big SUVs because they provide more protection in case you get in an accident with another car (a big “if” here), people should be encouraged to get smaller cars. The more small cars on the road, the less likely an accident is to be a complete and total wreck, meaning people will not be as harmed.

    The same argument works for Smart cars, and, indeed, every small car insurance companies and gas companies do not want people to buy because they will lose money. An interesting article contained a quote close to this (I mean very close but I unfortunately cannot recall the exact wording. The article was about Smart cars and Mercedes C class’s if you are interested in reading further): “If we continue along this line of thought, everyone should be driving Tractor Trailers [to remain safe in an accident].” Very true statement!

  • Sam

    The Tata Nano is a really cool car. I watched a video about it, though, and this annoying reporter woman who is “an expert on cars” (not sarcarm; the other annoying reporter lady said it first) was going on and on about how unsafe it is because there are no airbags. Personally, I think airbags are hazards (if I crash into someone head on, do I really want a hard piece of dashboard plastic being blown into my face? no.), but ignoring that, if the majority of people on the roads in India or any country for that matter drove these Nanos or other small cars, would they still be unsafe? If two Nanos crash into each other, will the drivers be in danger? Marginally, but not as badly as everyone says. So instead of encouraging people to stick to big SUVs because they provide more protection in case you get in an accident with another car (a big “if” here), people should be encouraged to get smaller cars. The more small cars on the road, the less likely an accident is to be a complete and total wreck, meaning people will not be as harmed.

    The same argument works for Smart cars, and, indeed, every small car insurance companies and gas companies do not want people to buy because they will lose money. An interesting article contained a quote close to this (I mean very close but I unfortunately cannot recall the exact wording. The article was about Smart cars and Mercedes C class’s if you are interested in reading further): “If we continue along this line of thought, everyone should be driving Tractor Trailers [to remain safe in an accident].” Very true statement!

  • Ron

    I think that this is an incredibly affordible car, but as mentioned it may not be as cheap as originally priced ($2000-$3000 us). The thought of flooding the developing world with 55mpg cars scares me simply from the polution viewpoint. On another note, the question at the beginning of the thread asked if I knew of any other car that was more frugal with fuel. Well not yet, but the VW 1L is schedualed for 2010 and it claims something like 250mpg on desiel with some cool technology under the hood and roughly a 130kph top speed. Albeit the price tag would be several times that of the TaTa auto.

  • Ron

    I think that this is an incredibly affordible car, but as mentioned it may not be as cheap as originally priced ($2000-$3000 us). The thought of flooding the developing world with 55mpg cars scares me simply from the polution viewpoint. On another note, the question at the beginning of the thread asked if I knew of any other car that was more frugal with fuel. Well not yet, but the VW 1L is schedualed for 2010 and it claims something like 250mpg on desiel with some cool technology under the hood and roughly a 130kph top speed. Albeit the price tag would be several times that of the TaTa auto.

  • Ron

    I think that this is an incredibly affordible car, but as mentioned it may not be as cheap as originally priced ($2000-$3000 us). The thought of flooding the developing world with 55mpg cars scares me simply from the polution viewpoint. On another note, the question at the beginning of the thread asked if I knew of any other car that was more frugal with fuel. Well not yet, but the VW 1L is schedualed for 2010 and it claims something like 250mpg on desiel with some cool technology under the hood and roughly a 130kph top speed. Albeit the price tag would be several times that of the TaTa auto.

  • Ron

    I think that this is an incredibly affordible car, but as mentioned it may not be as cheap as originally priced ($2000-$3000 us). The thought of flooding the developing world with 55mpg cars scares me simply from the polution viewpoint. On another note, the question at the beginning of the thread asked if I knew of any other car that was more frugal with fuel. Well not yet, but the VW 1L is schedualed for 2010 and it claims something like 250mpg on desiel with some cool technology under the hood and roughly a 130kph top speed. Albeit the price tag would be several times that of the TaTa auto.

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  • Punch

    We can not wat untill Tata Nano hits US Market, We saw the performance in East Asia, really cool look and all the taxi drivers were so happy !!! Yes, safety standards need to be upgraded to make it US competitive in Europe, US market .
    Write your congressmen/women to let Tata Nano enter US market for less than 6-8000 dollars for 120 MPG
    Remember Toyota/Datsun entry in 70′s to make it an instant hit !!!

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