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Published on November 11th, 2008 | by Nick Chambers

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Electric Car Start-Up, Fisker, Opens Huge Center in Michigan


At least one of the highly touted alternative car start-ups is expanding in the face of an economic meltdown.

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Fisker Automotive yesterday announced (PDF) the opening of a 34,000 square foot Engineering and Development Center in Pontiac, Michigan, that will house up to 200 engineers and designers in support of Fisker’s much anticipated plug-in hybrid car, the four-door Fisker Karma.

Amid news of Tesla Motors’ (the other much-ballyhooed electric car start-up) recent “shrinkage,” Fisker seems to be flaunting its success. As the press release makes sure to point out, “The opening of [their new] facility comes on the heels of Fisker Automotive’s recent announcement that it prevailed in a lawsuit brought against the company by Tesla Motors.”

The bad blood between Tesla and Fisker goes back a ways. In April, Tesla sued Fisker Automotive claiming that Henrik Fisker took on an $875,000 design contract with Tesla in order to access confidential design information. Less than a year after his contract ended, Fisker launched his own company and announced the Karma. In June, Fisker won the suit in binding arbitration.

So it seems that, for now, Fisker is on a roll, while Tesla is starting to lose its steam. Last September, Fisker announced that they had raised $65 million dollars in a large round of funding while, just a month later, Tesla was forced to lay off employees and scale back operations due to inadequate funding.

Fisker is set to release the Karma at the end of next year. Allegedly, the Karma has a 50 mile all-electric range and more than 350 miles of total range. Fisker claims that the Karma “will have the potential for a fuel economy of over 100 miles per gallon on extended drives.” The car is expected to cost around $80,000 — which is $29,000 less than Tesla’s Roadster — and Fisker plans on selling 15,000 of them annually by 2011.

Source and Image Credit: Fisker Automotive




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About the Author

Not your traditional car guy.



  • http://www.zoomilife.com Sebastian

    I have to say – the Fisker Karma is a truly James Bond-worthy automobile. It is one sexy car! I also like the Lightning electric car, made in the UK – we posted about it on my blog:

    http://www.zoomilife.com/2008/10/30/teslas-lightning-competition/

    I truly hope we start seeing more companies release innovative electric car products. What we really need is an inexpensive 4 door sedan – Tesla’s pitching their model S but I’d really like to see another company enter the fray.

  • http://www.zoomilife.com Sebastian

    I have to say – the Fisker Karma is a truly James Bond-worthy automobile. It is one sexy car! I also like the Lightning electric car, made in the UK – we posted about it on my blog:

    http://www.zoomilife.com/2008/10/30/teslas-lightning-competition/

    I truly hope we start seeing more companies release innovative electric car products. What we really need is an inexpensive 4 door sedan – Tesla’s pitching their model S but I’d really like to see another company enter the fray.

  • Nick

    $80,000 per car? That is nuts. Absolutely crazy. Over five years, one would have to use $30 of fuel per day in their regular car, stay less than 50 miles per day in the Fisker car and never have a battery failure in order to come out even… assuming a normal car would cost $25,000.

    They’ve got to work on the price point or the investors who kicked in their $65 million are going to lose their butts. Who would invest in something that has no chance of selling except as a novelty?

  • Nick

    $80,000 per car? That is nuts. Absolutely crazy. Over five years, one would have to use $30 of fuel per day in their regular car, stay less than 50 miles per day in the Fisker car and never have a battery failure in order to come out even… assuming a normal car would cost $25,000.

    They’ve got to work on the price point or the investors who kicked in their $65 million are going to lose their butts. Who would invest in something that has no chance of selling except as a novelty?

  • Nick

    $80,000 per car? That is nuts. Absolutely crazy. Over five years, one would have to use $30 of fuel per day in their regular car, stay less than 50 miles per day in the Fisker car and never have a battery failure in order to come out even… assuming a normal car would cost $25,000.

    They’ve got to work on the price point or the investors who kicked in their $65 million are going to lose their butts. Who would invest in something that has no chance of selling except as a novelty?

  • Doug

    I agree Nick. When are these people going to realize that the only way to make the EV industry viable is to produce cars the “average” American can afford. Are there really enough eco-celebrities to keep this company afloat?

  • Doug

    I agree Nick. When are these people going to realize that the only way to make the EV industry viable is to produce cars the “average” American can afford. Are there really enough eco-celebrities to keep this company afloat?

  • Nick Chambers

    I partially agree with both Nick and Doug above. But, I also think that there’s a place for expensive luxury electric cars as well. Actually, even with all of Tesla’s woes, they are still selling cars… even if they’re novelties for the rich. Both Fisker and Tesla have taken the business approach of starting high and eventually building cars that “everybody” can afford, Whereas companies like Aptera and Think are starting with the “everyman” car and building from there. I don’t know which strategy will prove most successful.

  • Tim Cleland

    This, to me, is what makes the Chevy Volt so much more important than these high-priced toys. I don’t doubt that there will be people who want the Tesla and the Fisker (mostly rich people), but those cars are not going to do anything real for the U.S. energy situation unless they get into the hands of a significant number of the driving population. The Volt (and other major manufacturers’ offerings like the Prius Plug-in and the Nissan

    Altima plug-in hybrid) will do that precisely because they’ll be more affordable.

  • Tim Cleland

    This, to me, is what makes the Chevy Volt so much more important than these high-priced toys. I don’t doubt that there will be people who want the Tesla and the Fisker (mostly rich people), but those cars are not going to do anything real for the U.S. energy situation unless they get into the hands of a significant number of the driving population. The Volt (and other major manufacturers’ offerings like the Prius Plug-in and the Nissan

    Altima plug-in hybrid) will do that precisely because they’ll be more affordable.

  • http://zaitcev.livejournal.com/ Pete Zaitcev

    It may be useful to remember that Tesla is delivering the cars to customers now, whereas Fisker doesn’t. Who knows what is going to happen when Fisker gets where Tesla is now. My money is on a buy-out by an established manufacturer.

  • http://zaitcev.livejournal.com/ Pete Zaitcev

    It may be useful to remember that Tesla is delivering the cars to customers now, whereas Fisker doesn’t. Who knows what is going to happen when Fisker gets where Tesla is now. My money is on a buy-out by an established manufacturer.

  • http://zaitcev.livejournal.com/ Pete Zaitcev

    It may be useful to remember that Tesla is delivering the cars to customers now, whereas Fisker doesn’t. Who knows what is going to happen when Fisker gets where Tesla is now. My money is on a buy-out by an established manufacturer.

  • Ziv

    The more the merrier, with Tesla building from the top (and Fisker coming soon) and GM, Mitsu, Chrysler and Toyota coming soon from the middle to high-middle, hopefully we will have some real options for PHEV’s, EREV’s and BEV’s within a few years. We will definitely need them.

    GM claims Volt will sell in the high $30’s so subtract the tax break of $7,000 and you end up with a car around $31k or $32k. Not completely making sense monetarily but being able to use American electricity instead of foreign oil means a lot to me, and I can make my own electricity, I can’t make my own oil.

    That having been said, Honda’s new insight with 60 mpg and selling for less than $19,000 will make a lot more sense financially. 60+ mpg means they will use 200 gallons of gasoline a year, most of us use 600-750 gallons. Now THAT is a horse of a different color! It really puts pressure on the BEV and EREV builders to build an inexpensive car sooner rather than later.

  • Ziv

    The more the merrier, with Tesla building from the top (and Fisker coming soon) and GM, Mitsu, Chrysler and Toyota coming soon from the middle to high-middle, hopefully we will have some real options for PHEV’s, EREV’s and BEV’s within a few years. We will definitely need them.

    GM claims Volt will sell in the high $30’s so subtract the tax break of $7,000 and you end up with a car around $31k or $32k. Not completely making sense monetarily but being able to use American electricity instead of foreign oil means a lot to me, and I can make my own electricity, I can’t make my own oil.

    That having been said, Honda’s new insight with 60 mpg and selling for less than $19,000 will make a lot more sense financially. 60+ mpg means they will use 200 gallons of gasoline a year, most of us use 600-750 gallons. Now THAT is a horse of a different color! It really puts pressure on the BEV and EREV builders to build an inexpensive car sooner rather than later.

  • Ziv

    The more the merrier, with Tesla building from the top (and Fisker coming soon) and GM, Mitsu, Chrysler and Toyota coming soon from the middle to high-middle, hopefully we will have some real options for PHEV’s, EREV’s and BEV’s within a few years. We will definitely need them.

    GM claims Volt will sell in the high $30’s so subtract the tax break of $7,000 and you end up with a car around $31k or $32k. Not completely making sense monetarily but being able to use American electricity instead of foreign oil means a lot to me, and I can make my own electricity, I can’t make my own oil.

    That having been said, Honda’s new insight with 60 mpg and selling for less than $19,000 will make a lot more sense financially. 60+ mpg means they will use 200 gallons of gasoline a year, most of us use 600-750 gallons. Now THAT is a horse of a different color! It really puts pressure on the BEV and EREV builders to build an inexpensive car sooner rather than later.

  • RR Ryan

    Trust me, there’s at a market for these things in LA. When I see a Veyron tooling down my little side street and a Maserati Quattroporte isn’t even garaged, anything is possible. Whether it makes any objective sense or not is another question.

  • RR Ryan

    Trust me, there’s at a market for these things in LA. When I see a Veyron tooling down my little side street and a Maserati Quattroporte isn’t even garaged, anything is possible. Whether it makes any objective sense or not is another question.

  • RR Ryan

    Trust me, there’s at a market for these things in LA. When I see a Veyron tooling down my little side street and a Maserati Quattroporte isn’t even garaged, anything is possible. Whether it makes any objective sense or not is another question.

  • mrkwong

    Fer chrissake, will you folks prattling about the cost of the thing give half an ounce of thought to what it costs to BUILD the thing? This is a fairly conventionally-sized vehicle with a substantial carrying capacity, unlike say an Aptera or even a Tesla roadster.

    Batteries are expensive. VERY expensive. Far more expensive than anything that goes into a pure ICE-powered car. The more battery range you want, the more it’s going to cost. And most of those batteries come from China, so there goes the balance-of-payments again.

    Starting a new car company costs money. And I’m inclined to think Fisker is serious, and he’s got a fairly substantial track record. Having worked for Elon Musk at one point in a non-automotive environment, I have great sympathy for those folks at Tesla actually trying to get product out the door.

  • mrkwong

    Fer chrissake, will you folks prattling about the cost of the thing give half an ounce of thought to what it costs to BUILD the thing? This is a fairly conventionally-sized vehicle with a substantial carrying capacity, unlike say an Aptera or even a Tesla roadster.

    Batteries are expensive. VERY expensive. Far more expensive than anything that goes into a pure ICE-powered car. The more battery range you want, the more it’s going to cost. And most of those batteries come from China, so there goes the balance-of-payments again.

    Starting a new car company costs money. And I’m inclined to think Fisker is serious, and he’s got a fairly substantial track record. Having worked for Elon Musk at one point in a non-automotive environment, I have great sympathy for those folks at Tesla actually trying to get product out the door.

  • mrkwong

    Fer chrissake, will you folks prattling about the cost of the thing give half an ounce of thought to what it costs to BUILD the thing? This is a fairly conventionally-sized vehicle with a substantial carrying capacity, unlike say an Aptera or even a Tesla roadster.

    Batteries are expensive. VERY expensive. Far more expensive than anything that goes into a pure ICE-powered car. The more battery range you want, the more it’s going to cost. And most of those batteries come from China, so there goes the balance-of-payments again.

    Starting a new car company costs money. And I’m inclined to think Fisker is serious, and he’s got a fairly substantial track record. Having worked for Elon Musk at one point in a non-automotive environment, I have great sympathy for those folks at Tesla actually trying to get product out the door.

  • DensityDuck

    Tesla and Tes–er, FISKER, sorry, they won the lawsuit and all–anyway, those two have the right idea.

    The average consumer will consider economy when buying a car–and if fuel prices stay where they are, then gas-burners beat electric. Even the Insight is still too high–a comparable gas-burner is ten thousand dollars less.

    For the next few years, electric cars will be rich mens’ toys; which means that you might as well price (and build) for the rich mens’ market.

    “Oh, but what about the Aptera?” Ha. First off, it’s about as crashworthy as a Fiero. Second, door-dings will require vehicle replacement; there’s no way to “fix” a monocoque composite structure.

    PS. Hey Fisker, Jaguar called, they want their XK8 back.

  • DensityDuck

    Tesla and Tes–er, FISKER, sorry, they won the lawsuit and all–anyway, those two have the right idea.

    The average consumer will consider economy when buying a car–and if fuel prices stay where they are, then gas-burners beat electric. Even the Insight is still too high–a comparable gas-burner is ten thousand dollars less.

    For the next few years, electric cars will be rich mens’ toys; which means that you might as well price (and build) for the rich mens’ market.

    “Oh, but what about the Aptera?” Ha. First off, it’s about as crashworthy as a Fiero. Second, door-dings will require vehicle replacement; there’s no way to “fix” a monocoque composite structure.

    PS. Hey Fisker, Jaguar called, they want their XK8 back.

  • DensityDuck

    Tesla and Tes–er, FISKER, sorry, they won the lawsuit and all–anyway, those two have the right idea.

    The average consumer will consider economy when buying a car–and if fuel prices stay where they are, then gas-burners beat electric. Even the Insight is still too high–a comparable gas-burner is ten thousand dollars less.

    For the next few years, electric cars will be rich mens’ toys; which means that you might as well price (and build) for the rich mens’ market.

    “Oh, but what about the Aptera?” Ha. First off, it’s about as crashworthy as a Fiero. Second, door-dings will require vehicle replacement; there’s no way to “fix” a monocoque composite structure.

    PS. Hey Fisker, Jaguar called, they want their XK8 back.

  • JonD

    No disrespect, but Nick, Doug, and Nick are wrong. Putting expensive electric and hybrid tech in the hands of rich people is *exactly* how we get these technologies into the hands of the rest of us.

    The world is full of expensive cars full of expensive toys that the rest of us can’t afford. Anti-lock brakes, air bags, traction control, nav systems, all started out on Mercedes. Once the idea is proven, everyone else will get on board.

    Let the rich enjoy their expensive, cool toys now, so we can drive *real* $20K electric cars.

    Maybe it takes 10 years. I can wait, the planet will survive, and we won’t have spent billions of dollars of federal grant money trying to shoehorn $100K of tech (now) into a $20K car.

  • JonD

    No disrespect, but Nick, Doug, and Nick are wrong. Putting expensive electric and hybrid tech in the hands of rich people is *exactly* how we get these technologies into the hands of the rest of us.

    The world is full of expensive cars full of expensive toys that the rest of us can’t afford. Anti-lock brakes, air bags, traction control, nav systems, all started out on Mercedes. Once the idea is proven, everyone else will get on board.

    Let the rich enjoy their expensive, cool toys now, so we can drive *real* $20K electric cars.

    Maybe it takes 10 years. I can wait, the planet will survive, and we won’t have spent billions of dollars of federal grant money trying to shoehorn $100K of tech (now) into a $20K car.

  • JonD

    No disrespect, but Nick, Doug, and Nick are wrong. Putting expensive electric and hybrid tech in the hands of rich people is *exactly* how we get these technologies into the hands of the rest of us.

    The world is full of expensive cars full of expensive toys that the rest of us can’t afford. Anti-lock brakes, air bags, traction control, nav systems, all started out on Mercedes. Once the idea is proven, everyone else will get on board.

    Let the rich enjoy their expensive, cool toys now, so we can drive *real* $20K electric cars.

    Maybe it takes 10 years. I can wait, the planet will survive, and we won’t have spent billions of dollars of federal grant money trying to shoehorn $100K of tech (now) into a $20K car.

  • Ken Mitchell, Citrus Heights,

    I have a question. Given that the purpose of the fancy grille on the front of a conventional car is to allow cooling air to flow through/across the radiator, why, other than lack of imagination, do _electric_ cars have a slotted grille? Why not a nice aerodynamic solid front?

  • Ken Mitchell, Citrus Heights,

    I have a question. Given that the purpose of the fancy grille on the front of a conventional car is to allow cooling air to flow through/across the radiator, why, other than lack of imagination, do _electric_ cars have a slotted grille? Why not a nice aerodynamic solid front?

  • Ken Mitchell, Citrus Heights, CA

    I have a question. Given that the purpose of the fancy grille on the front of a conventional car is to allow cooling air to flow through/across the radiator, why, other than lack of imagination, do _electric_ cars have a slotted grille? Why not a nice aerodynamic solid front?

  • http://www.nujusan.com Nujuさん

    JonD your wrong; I understand that is how it works currently, but part of saving the planet and saving our economy means changing what made our planet and our econmy go down in the first place. instead of doing it right we cater the the rich and their firends first. if you want to change the world, you do it right. Honda and Nintendo have the right idea make it simple and make it affordable. They can do it why cannt the rest of the world get on board. selling one car a month for 80k and selling 30 cars amoth for 30k has a much higher returns.

  • http://www.nujusan.com Nujuさん

    JonD your wrong; I understand that is how it works currently, but part of saving the planet and saving our economy means changing what made our planet and our econmy go down in the first place. instead of doing it right we cater the the rich and their firends first. if you want to change the world, you do it right. Honda and Nintendo have the right idea make it simple and make it affordable. They can do it why cannt the rest of the world get on board. selling one car a month for 80k and selling 30 cars amoth for 30k has a much higher returns.

  • http://www.nujusan.com Nujuさん

    JonD your wrong; I understand that is how it works currently, but part of saving the planet and saving our economy means changing what made our planet and our econmy go down in the first place. instead of doing it right we cater the the rich and their firends first. if you want to change the world, you do it right. Honda and Nintendo have the right idea make it simple and make it affordable. They can do it why cannt the rest of the world get on board. selling one car a month for 80k and selling 30 cars amoth for 30k has a much higher returns.

  • helowrench

    DensityDuck, there is already an entire industry that “fixes” monocoque composite structures.Shh don’t tell anyone. Also , we have to deal with our structures being load bearing to a much much higher degree than any car.

    We also have to deal with aerodynamics center of gravity changes as well as flight characteristics.

    Also, you might want to note that composites can easily be stronger and stiffer than any metal based product, so “crashworthiness” is not a valid complaint until we actually start seeing some test results.

    Quit bellyaching until you get something realistic to bellyache about.

  • helowrench

    DensityDuck, there is already an entire industry that “fixes” monocoque composite structures.Shh don’t tell anyone. Also , we have to deal with our structures being load bearing to a much much higher degree than any car.

    We also have to deal with aerodynamics center of gravity changes as well as flight characteristics.

    Also, you might want to note that composites can easily be stronger and stiffer than any metal based product, so “crashworthiness” is not a valid complaint until we actually start seeing some test results.

    Quit bellyaching until you get something realistic to bellyache about.

  • ken in sc

    Do any of you folks remember when the digital watch first came out–how much they cost and who bought them–how about digital slide-rules, now called calculators. The rich first adopters finance the future. Don’t stand in the way.

  • ken in sc

    Do any of you folks remember when the digital watch first came out–how much they cost and who bought them–how about digital slide-rules, now called calculators. The rich first adopters finance the future. Don’t stand in the way.

  • ken in sc

    Do any of you folks remember when the digital watch first came out–how much they cost and who bought them–how about digital slide-rules, now called calculators. The rich first adopters finance the future. Don’t stand in the way.

  • mrkwong

    Nuju – there’s nothing any simpler about a Honda than any other car these days. The condition of our environment is better than it’s been in a century and anthropogenic global warming is found only in computer models, not in real-world evidence. Our economy has tanked because rising interest rates met explosively rising energy costs (partly due to obsessive dollar-weakening by the Bush administration) and a bubble that should have gone “pfft” went “BANG!” instead.

    The fact is we are better off that something like plug-in hybrids and battery EVs start as a modest stream into the market and not a flood. There’s a lot of unknowns that aren’t handled any better by computer models than Hansen’s GISS has done on AGW, lifecycle environmental impact, charging and general electric T&D infrastructure, etc.

    Oh, here’s one for the unintended-consequences file: http://motls.blogspot.com/2008/10/global-warming-caused-by-solar-panels.html

  • mrkwong

    Nuju – there’s nothing any simpler about a Honda than any other car these days. The condition of our environment is better than it’s been in a century and anthropogenic global warming is found only in computer models, not in real-world evidence. Our economy has tanked because rising interest rates met explosively rising energy costs (partly due to obsessive dollar-weakening by the Bush administration) and a bubble that should have gone “pfft” went “BANG!” instead.

    The fact is we are better off that something like plug-in hybrids and battery EVs start as a modest stream into the market and not a flood. There’s a lot of unknowns that aren’t handled any better by computer models than Hansen’s GISS has done on AGW, lifecycle environmental impact, charging and general electric T&D infrastructure, etc.

    Oh, here’s one for the unintended-consequences file: http://motls.blogspot.com/2008/10/global-warming-caused-by-solar-panels.html

  • mrkwong

    Nuju – there’s nothing any simpler about a Honda than any other car these days. The condition of our environment is better than it’s been in a century and anthropogenic global warming is found only in computer models, not in real-world evidence. Our economy has tanked because rising interest rates met explosively rising energy costs (partly due to obsessive dollar-weakening by the Bush administration) and a bubble that should have gone “pfft” went “BANG!” instead.

    The fact is we are better off that something like plug-in hybrids and battery EVs start as a modest stream into the market and not a flood. There’s a lot of unknowns that aren’t handled any better by computer models than Hansen’s GISS has done on AGW, lifecycle environmental impact, charging and general electric T&D infrastructure, etc.

    Oh, here’s one for the unintended-consequences file: http://motls.blogspot.com/2008/10/global-warming-caused-by-solar-panels.html

  • DensityDuck

    helowrench: I design composite structures for satellites at my day job with Lockheed; don’t be handing ME any sales brochures. I know what they’re good for, and what they’re bad for. You’ve heard the term “black aluminum”, right? And before this I was with NASA’s AVSP, crashing Lear Fans and Beech Starships and all sorts of nonmetallic airframes. This is not my first time around the block.

  • DensityDuck

    helowrench: I design composite structures for satellites at my day job with Lockheed; don’t be handing ME any sales brochures. I know what they’re good for, and what they’re bad for. You’ve heard the term “black aluminum”, right? And before this I was with NASA’s AVSP, crashing Lear Fans and Beech Starships and all sorts of nonmetallic airframes. This is not my first time around the block.

  • scott

    To all you who think these cars are a poor idea because they are expensive, think again. When the very first autos came out, only the wealthy could afford them – much like the electric cars of today. We should thank the early adopters of today for purchasing these cars and providing funding for them so that we common folk can someday afford to buy them as well. Prices will come down once the technology catches up and demand increases – just like it did with the very first cars.

  • scott

    To all you who think these cars are a poor idea because they are expensive, think again. When the very first autos came out, only the wealthy could afford them – much like the electric cars of today. We should thank the early adopters of today for purchasing these cars and providing funding for them so that we common folk can someday afford to buy them as well. Prices will come down once the technology catches up and demand increases – just like it did with the very first cars.

  • Brian K

    OK, so where is the new location?

  • Brian K

    OK, so where is the new location?

  • Brian K

    OK, so where is the new location?

  • Nick Chambers

    Brian,

    If your question is, “Where is the new Fisker building located?”, re-read the first sentence after the photograph. If that’s not your question, please rephrase.

  • Carl R Rushton

    Fuel cell powered electric vehicles

    Through water electrolysis (Avalence LLC) this system produces hydrogen on board the vehicle. Hydrogen mixed with Oxygen through a PEM fuel cell stack (General Motors) creates electricity to power a 1st stage motor and magnet generator to power the main batteries this eliminates the combustion engine. Using magnet generators on the rear axels the car produces power through motion

    The basis of my patent, which I let expire, is a simple flow diagram. We do not want to store excessive amounts of hydrogen on board in high pressure containers. We do not want a combustion engine running on hydrogen do to the amount of hydrogen required to fuel such a vehicle. Fuel cells and associated electric cars are limited because it takes a lot of fuel cell stacks to feasible power electric motors or keep a main battery fully charged.

    Solution:

    First use the hydrogen generator which produces hydrogen through electrolysis. Produce enough hydrogen to power a small stack of PEM fuel cells to power the first stage motor which powers a DC magnet generator. This is much like a Dewalt re-chargeable drill. The fuel cell powers the 18Volt rechargeable battery and the size of the magnet generator can be sized to recharge the main batteries in 3-6 hours.

    Secondly,

    design the vehicle with front wheel drive electric motors, leave the rear wheels to attach their axels to magnet generators so when you drive you are producing power directly to the front wheel drive electric motors or to the main batteries. After a 50 mile commute to work the main batteries should be fully charged and if not the 1st stage fuel cell magnet generator will top of the main batteries for the commute home.

    This system of power loss and recovery should provide enough hydrogen and electricity for a power system that could take you across country on water, air and a small amount of hydrogen.

    Please find below the components required and are in production.

    Hydrogen Generator by Avalence LLC

    Electric Motors at the wheels

    PEM Fuel Cell care of GM

    DC magnet generators, been around for years.

    If you have any questions this is the basis of my expired Patent #60/716,613

    Regards,

    Carl R Rushton

    Meriden, Connecticut

  • Carl R Rushton

    Fuel cell powered electric vehicles

    Through water electrolysis (Avalence LLC) this system produces hydrogen on board the vehicle. Hydrogen mixed with Oxygen through a PEM fuel cell stack (General Motors) creates electricity to power a 1st stage motor and magnet generator to power the main batteries this eliminates the combustion engine. Using magnet generators on the rear axels the car produces power through motion

    The basis of my patent, which I let expire, is a simple flow diagram. We do not want to store excessive amounts of hydrogen on board in high pressure containers. We do not want a combustion engine running on hydrogen do to the amount of hydrogen required to fuel such a vehicle. Fuel cells and associated electric cars are limited because it takes a lot of fuel cell stacks to feasible power electric motors or keep a main battery fully charged.

    Solution:

    First use the hydrogen generator which produces hydrogen through electrolysis. Produce enough hydrogen to power a small stack of PEM fuel cells to power the first stage motor which powers a DC magnet generator. This is much like a Dewalt re-chargeable drill. The fuel cell powers the 18Volt rechargeable battery and the size of the magnet generator can be sized to recharge the main batteries in 3-6 hours.

    Secondly,

    design the vehicle with front wheel drive electric motors, leave the rear wheels to attach their axels to magnet generators so when you drive you are producing power directly to the front wheel drive electric motors or to the main batteries. After a 50 mile commute to work the main batteries should be fully charged and if not the 1st stage fuel cell magnet generator will top of the main batteries for the commute home.

    This system of power loss and recovery should provide enough hydrogen and electricity for a power system that could take you across country on water, air and a small amount of hydrogen.

    Please find below the components required and are in production.

    Hydrogen Generator by Avalence LLC

    Electric Motors at the wheels

    PEM Fuel Cell care of GM

    DC magnet generators, been around for years.

    If you have any questions this is the basis of my expired Patent #60/716,613

    Regards,

    Carl R Rushton

    Meriden, Connecticut

  • Carl R Rushton

    Fuel cell powered electric vehicles

    Through water electrolysis (Avalence LLC) this system produces hydrogen on board the vehicle. Hydrogen mixed with Oxygen through a PEM fuel cell stack (General Motors) creates electricity to power a 1st stage motor and magnet generator to power the main batteries this eliminates the combustion engine. Using magnet generators on the rear axels the car produces power through motion

    The basis of my patent, which I let expire, is a simple flow diagram. We do not want to store excessive amounts of hydrogen on board in high pressure containers. We do not want a combustion engine running on hydrogen do to the amount of hydrogen required to fuel such a vehicle. Fuel cells and associated electric cars are limited because it takes a lot of fuel cell stacks to feasible power electric motors or keep a main battery fully charged.

    Solution:

    First use the hydrogen generator which produces hydrogen through electrolysis. Produce enough hydrogen to power a small stack of PEM fuel cells to power the first stage motor which powers a DC magnet generator. This is much like a Dewalt re-chargeable drill. The fuel cell powers the 18Volt rechargeable battery and the size of the magnet generator can be sized to recharge the main batteries in 3-6 hours.

    Secondly,

    design the vehicle with front wheel drive electric motors, leave the rear wheels to attach their axels to magnet generators so when you drive you are producing power directly to the front wheel drive electric motors or to the main batteries. After a 50 mile commute to work the main batteries should be fully charged and if not the 1st stage fuel cell magnet generator will top of the main batteries for the commute home.

    This system of power loss and recovery should provide enough hydrogen and electricity for a power system that could take you across country on water, air and a small amount of hydrogen.

    Please find below the components required and are in production.

    Hydrogen Generator by Avalence LLC

    Electric Motors at the wheels

    PEM Fuel Cell care of GM

    DC magnet generators, been around for years.

    If you have any questions this is the basis of my expired Patent #60/716,613

    Regards,

    Carl R Rushton

    Meriden, Connecticut

  • GREG

    THIS IS THE MOST HIGH TECH CAR IN THE WORLD. WE MOVED INTO THE NEW FISKER TECH/DESIGN CENTER AND ITS STATE OF THE ART. IM GLAD TO BE PART OF THE TEAM. I WILL OWN ONE OF THESE. GREG FROM DETROIT

  • GREG

    THIS IS THE MOST HIGH TECH CAR IN THE WORLD. WE MOVED INTO THE NEW FISKER TECH/DESIGN CENTER AND ITS STATE OF THE ART. IM GLAD TO BE PART OF THE TEAM. I WILL OWN ONE OF THESE. GREG FROM DETROIT

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