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Published on October 28th, 2008 | by Nick Chambers

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UPS is First in Delivery Industry to Test Hydraulic Hybrid Vehicles: 50% Better Fuel Economy and 40% Lower Emissions


In partnership with the US Environmental Protection Agency, UPS will begin testing a small fleet of hydraulic hybrid delivery trucks in the United States. The new vehicles can achieve 50-70% better fuel economy, a 40% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, and pay for their extra expense in less than 3 years.

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UPS will field two hydraulic hybrids in Minneapolis, MN, in early 2009 and an additional five hydraulic hybrid trucks will be deployed later in 2009 and early 2010. Although this sounds like a tiny fleet, keep in mind that this is the largest scale commercial test of hydraulic hybrids ever conducted.

The UPS hybrid hydraulic truck is a standard-looking 24,000 pound package car, with an EPA-patented diesel series hydraulic hybrid drive attached to the rear axle.

In a series hydraulic hybrid, the conventional drivetrain is replaced with a hydraulic system that stores energy by compressing gas in a chamber using hydraulic fluid. It works in much the same way that a hybrid electric car does — a small, efficient motor generates power which gets stored for later use — only, the way energy is stored in a hydraulic hybrid is in a pressurized chamber rather than in a battery.

The hydraulic hybrid drivetrain eliminates the need for a conventional transmission and increases fuel economy in three ways:

  1. A large amount of the energy that is otherwise wasted in braking can be recovered to pressurize the hydraulic fluid.
  2. The engine operates much more efficiently — similar to a hybrid electric car, only without the bulky batteries
  3. The engine can easily be shut off and instantaneously restarted during regular driving — such as when the vehicle is slowing down or stopped at a light.

UPS has been developing what it calls its “green fleet” over the last several years and currently has more than 1,600 low carbon emissions vehicles including electric, hybrid-electric, compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, and propane trucks.

Although this is a small step, I applaud UPS for testing the waters. Hopefully others will join in quickly.

Source: UPS press release

Image Credit: UPS




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About the Author

Not your traditional car guy.



  • Carbon Buildup

    Who actually makes these hydraulic hybrid vehicles? Do they have any plans to produce passenger vehicles with the technology? From how you describe them, they already sound like they are a sure thing. So where are the non-UPS hydraulic hybrids? Cranky, cynical minds want to know.

  • Carbon Buildup

    Who actually makes these hydraulic hybrid vehicles? Do they have any plans to produce passenger vehicles with the technology? From how you describe them, they already sound like they are a sure thing. So where are the non-UPS hydraulic hybrids? Cranky, cynical minds want to know.

  • Nick Chambers

    Carbon, my friend, your cranky cynical mind has jumped several steps ahead of the testing process.

    We have another post on Gas 2.0 about a company called Artemis who has been working on a passenger car version of the hydraulic hybrid. You can see it here:

    http://gas2.org/2008/06/13/hydraulic-hybrid-technology-could-rival-batteries/

    It is still a new technology and has to be road tested before it can be implemented at full-scale. But my bet is that it will take hold in other areas soon too.

  • Jim Rambo

    Just one small correction to your story. Your quote “hydraulic system that stores energy by compressing hydraulic fluid in a chamber.” Hydraulic fluid is non compressible as is any liquid. Sorry;)

  • Jim Rambo

    Just one small correction to your story. Your quote “hydraulic system that stores energy by compressing hydraulic fluid in a chamber.” Hydraulic fluid is non compressible as is any liquid. Sorry;)

    • jordan

      they compress nitrogen gas to in the accumulator the hydraulics are just used to gather the power from the wheels

  • Nick Chambers

    You’re right Jim. I guess the more accurate term would be “pressurizing” for those that understand the difference. I’ll change it.

  • Tim Cleland

    I studied these a while back. The actual energy is stored as compressed air. When the brake pedal is depressed, a hydraulic pump kicks in powered by the kinetic energy of the truck and it compressed airs as the truck comes to a stop (or slows) and then, when the brake is released, the increased pressure in the air tank is used to drive the fluid the other way (to move the truck).

    This is way cool technology. As long as the air compression tank is well insulated, it’s a very efficient system with little energy losses. (The insulation is needed to prevent loss of energy due to the heat of compression, i.e., when you compress air, it gets hotter…losing that heat lowers the pressure –> lost energy.)

    From what I understand it’s most amenable to trucks that do a lot of starting and stopping, particularly garbage trucks, mail trucks, buses, and delivery trucks. Any car/truck that regularly gets caught in big-city traffic could use this, however. All the technology is already there too and well understood (Hydraulics is a very mature technology…if you’ve ever seen a backhoe working, you’ve seen hydraulics in action).

    -Tim

  • Tim Cleland

    I studied these a while back. The actual energy is stored as compressed air. When the brake pedal is depressed, a hydraulic pump kicks in powered by the kinetic energy of the truck and it compressed airs as the truck comes to a stop (or slows) and then, when the brake is released, the increased pressure in the air tank is used to drive the fluid the other way (to move the truck).

    This is way cool technology. As long as the air compression tank is well insulated, it’s a very efficient system with little energy losses. (The insulation is needed to prevent loss of energy due to the heat of compression, i.e., when you compress air, it gets hotter…losing that heat lowers the pressure –> lost energy.)

    From what I understand it’s most amenable to trucks that do a lot of starting and stopping, particularly garbage trucks, mail trucks, buses, and delivery trucks. Any car/truck that regularly gets caught in big-city traffic could use this, however. All the technology is already there too and well understood (Hydraulics is a very mature technology…if you’ve ever seen a backhoe working, you’ve seen hydraulics in action).

    -Tim

  • Tim Cleland

    I studied these a while back. The actual energy is stored as compressed air. When the brake pedal is depressed, a hydraulic pump kicks in powered by the kinetic energy of the truck and it compressed airs as the truck comes to a stop (or slows) and then, when the brake is released, the increased pressure in the air tank is used to drive the fluid the other way (to move the truck).

    This is way cool technology. As long as the air compression tank is well insulated, it’s a very efficient system with little energy losses. (The insulation is needed to prevent loss of energy due to the heat of compression, i.e., when you compress air, it gets hotter…losing that heat lowers the pressure –> lost energy.)

    From what I understand it’s most amenable to trucks that do a lot of starting and stopping, particularly garbage trucks, mail trucks, buses, and delivery trucks. Any car/truck that regularly gets caught in big-city traffic could use this, however. All the technology is already there too and well understood (Hydraulics is a very mature technology…if you’ve ever seen a backhoe working, you’ve seen hydraulics in action).

    -Tim

  • Tim Cleland

    Typo. The third line above should read:

    “truck and it compresses air as the truck …”

  • Tim Cleland

    Typo. The third line above should read:

    “truck and it compresses air as the truck …”

  • Nick Chambers

    Tim,

    From the EPA website:

    “The high pressure accumulator stores energy as a battery would in a hybrid electric vehicle using hydraulic fluid to compress nitrogen gas”

    The nitrogen gas is compressed in a high pressure accumulator (chamber) and then, as the pump/motor uses the energy stored in the compressed gas, the low pressure hydraulic fluid outflow from the pump/motor is sent back to the low pressure chamber for reuse later on.

    I’ve made a few tweaks in the wording of my post to make this clear. Thanks.

  • John Watts

    Wow, that is pretty cool. Nice!

    Jiff

    http://www.anonymity.cz.tc

  • John Watts

    Wow, that is pretty cool. Nice!

    Jiff

    http://www.anonymity.cz.tc

  • John Watts

    Wow, that is pretty cool. Nice!

    Jiff

    http://www.anonymity.cz.tc

  • John Watts

    Wow, that is pretty cool. Nice!

    Jiff

    http://www.anonymity.cz.tc

  • http://www.officefurniture-manufacturers.com David

    UPS, that is nice, I choose it

  • http://www.officefurniture-manufacturers.com David

    UPS, that is nice, I choose it

  • http://www.officefurniture-manufacturers.com David

    UPS, that is nice, I choose it

  • http://www.officefurniture-manufacturers.com David

    UPS, that is nice, I choose it

  • Tim Cleland

    Nick,

    The tweaks definitely make it easier to understand for any newbies out there.

    -Tim

    P.S. How are you feeling after your accident?

  • Tim Cleland

    Nick,

    The tweaks definitely make it easier to understand for any newbies out there.

    -Tim

    P.S. How are you feeling after your accident?

  • Tim Cleland

    Nick,

    The tweaks definitely make it easier to understand for any newbies out there.

    -Tim

    P.S. How are you feeling after your accident?

  • Tim Cleland

    Nick,

    The tweaks definitely make it easier to understand for any newbies out there.

    -Tim

    P.S. How are you feeling after your accident?

  • Nick Chambers

    Tim,

    Thanks man. I am feeling a bit better, my muscle soreness is going away, but now I’m getting some joint pain in my shoulder… and where my head hit the side window I get occasional stabbing pains. But, considering the circumstances, I’m pretty stoked that that’s all I have.

  • http://www.chris-estes.com Chris Estes

    Hip Hip Hooray! I think this is great. I like to see companies becoming more socially responsible in reducing emissions. You bet they will get my packages in their continued effort to make the world a better place.

  • http://www.chris-estes.com Chris Estes

    Hip Hip Hooray! I think this is great. I like to see companies becoming more socially responsible in reducing emissions. You bet they will get my packages in their continued effort to make the world a better place.

  • Hybrids Anonymous

    Carbon Buildup: Eaton Corporation builds these hydraulic hybrids systems.

  • Hybrids Anonymous

    Carbon Buildup: Eaton Corporation builds these hydraulic hybrids systems.

  • HybriDuco

    Several other fleets have already tested this technology. This article exaggerates the benefits but it’s still worthwhile. Check out http://www.calstart.org or http://www.westart.org or “Hybrid Truck User Forum”.

  • HybriDuco

    Several other fleets have already tested this technology. This article exaggerates the benefits but it’s still worthwhile. Check out http://www.calstart.org or http://www.westart.org or “Hybrid Truck User Forum”.

  • http://apteraforum.com Nate

    Wait, so is it a series hybrid or a parallel hybrid? You mention it being series, but then you say that the engine shuts off at stoplights.

    I’m guessing that it operates like a series hybrid, just one with a *really small reservoir*. Am I right?

  • http://apteraforum.com Nate

    Wait, so is it a series hybrid or a parallel hybrid? You mention it being series, but then you say that the engine shuts off at stoplights.

    I’m guessing that it operates like a series hybrid, just one with a *really small reservoir*. Am I right?

  • http://apteraforum.com Nate

    Wait, so is it a series hybrid or a parallel hybrid? You mention it being series, but then you say that the engine shuts off at stoplights.

    I’m guessing that it operates like a series hybrid, just one with a *really small reservoir*. Am I right?

  • http://apteraforum.com Nate

    Wait, so is it a series hybrid or a parallel hybrid? You mention it being series, but then you say that the engine shuts off at stoplights.

    I’m guessing that it operates like a series hybrid, just one with a *really small reservoir*. Am I right?

  • Nick Chambers

    Nate,

    Don’t know about the “really small reservoir.” They don’t mention details like that in any of their literature that I could find. They do say that it is “full-series” hybrid though.

  • Jason

    These systems are also used aboard ships to store energy to start an emergency diesel. The nitrogen “bubble” is stored at the top of the cylinder and as the hydraulic fluid is pumped in it pressurizes the nitrogen. This is called the accumulator. Once the diesel recieves a start signal the hydraulic oil dumps due to the built up pressure of the nitrogen(around 2,000 psi) and cranks over the engine. In this scenario, the accumulator would be attached to the drive shaft. I read an article about a year ago that was saying ford was designing this for a f-150 platform, but i never heard anything else about it.

  • Jason

    These systems are also used aboard ships to store energy to start an emergency diesel. The nitrogen “bubble” is stored at the top of the cylinder and as the hydraulic fluid is pumped in it pressurizes the nitrogen. This is called the accumulator. Once the diesel recieves a start signal the hydraulic oil dumps due to the built up pressure of the nitrogen(around 2,000 psi) and cranks over the engine. In this scenario, the accumulator would be attached to the drive shaft. I read an article about a year ago that was saying ford was designing this for a f-150 platform, but i never heard anything else about it.

  • http://www.artformfunction.com Michael

    I wonder if it would be cost effective to heat the compressed nitrogen to increase its pressure and work it can do, maybe using the exhaust gas from the ic engine?

    I have read of wind farms that compress air into underground caverns, and use the compressed air to drive turbines for having a constant output. These setups often burn natural gas (as it goes into the turbine) in the air to increase the pressure/output.

  • http://www.artformfunction.com Michael

    I wonder if it would be cost effective to heat the compressed nitrogen to increase its pressure and work it can do, maybe using the exhaust gas from the ic engine?

    I have read of wind farms that compress air into underground caverns, and use the compressed air to drive turbines for having a constant output. These setups often burn natural gas (as it goes into the turbine) in the air to increase the pressure/output.

  • http://www.artformfunction.com Michael

    I wonder if it would be cost effective to heat the compressed nitrogen to increase its pressure and work it can do, maybe using the exhaust gas from the ic engine?

    I have read of wind farms that compress air into underground caverns, and use the compressed air to drive turbines for having a constant output. These setups often burn natural gas (as it goes into the turbine) in the air to increase the pressure/output.

  • http://www.artformfunction.com Michael

    I wonder if it would be cost effective to heat the compressed nitrogen to increase its pressure and work it can do, maybe using the exhaust gas from the ic engine?

    I have read of wind farms that compress air into underground caverns, and use the compressed air to drive turbines for having a constant output. These setups often burn natural gas (as it goes into the turbine) in the air to increase the pressure/output.

  • http://www.economicefficiency.blogspot.com WillG

    Great post! I read an article about this in the summer called “Hybrid Hummer Hums” found at http://economicefficiency.blogspot.com/2008/07/hybrid-hummer-hums.html

    I also saw one of these trucks in Sterling, VA about 6 months ago!

  • http://www.economicefficiency.blogspot.com WillG

    Great post! I read an article about this in the summer called “Hybrid Hummer Hums” found at http://economicefficiency.blogspot.com/2008/07/hybrid-hummer-hums.html

    I also saw one of these trucks in Sterling, VA about 6 months ago!

  • http://www.jjraymond.com Joe

    Thanks for the info Nick but disappointed the testing of these new vehicle technologies is moving at such a glacial pace. The article you linked to in the comments about Artemis was likewise interesting but, again, no move by Artemis from testing to production is discussed. Here is hoping this technology makes it to the market.

  • http://www.jjraymond.com Joe

    Thanks for the info Nick but disappointed the testing of these new vehicle technologies is moving at such a glacial pace. The article you linked to in the comments about Artemis was likewise interesting but, again, no move by Artemis from testing to production is discussed. Here is hoping this technology makes it to the market.

  • http://www.jjraymond.com Joe

    Thanks for the info Nick but disappointed the testing of these new vehicle technologies is moving at such a glacial pace. The article you linked to in the comments about Artemis was likewise interesting but, again, no move by Artemis from testing to production is discussed. Here is hoping this technology makes it to the market.

  • Drew

    I also picked up on this technology a couple of years back. If I recall correctly, the original technology was developed at the EPA itself, and then passed on to Eaton, which is why these two are still involved as shown in the UPS article.

    It’s exciting stuff, and I hope it moves ahead.

  • Drew

    I also picked up on this technology a couple of years back. If I recall correctly, the original technology was developed at the EPA itself, and then passed on to Eaton, which is why these two are still involved as shown in the UPS article.

    It’s exciting stuff, and I hope it moves ahead.

  • Tim Cleland

    “I wonder if it would be cost effective to heat the compressed nitrogen to increase its pressure and work it can do, maybe using the exhaust gas from the ic engine?”

    That’s a good idea to heat with the exhaust. It would be a good way to recapture some of the wasted heat energy.

  • Tim Cleland

    “I wonder if it would be cost effective to heat the compressed nitrogen to increase its pressure and work it can do, maybe using the exhaust gas from the ic engine?”

    That’s a good idea to heat with the exhaust. It would be a good way to recapture some of the wasted heat energy.

  • Tim Cleland

    “I wonder if it would be cost effective to heat the compressed nitrogen to increase its pressure and work it can do, maybe using the exhaust gas from the ic engine?”

    That’s a good idea to heat with the exhaust. It would be a good way to recapture some of the wasted heat energy.

  • http://www.boredquiz.com/personality_quiz/what-kind-of-driver-are-you-2008-09-06/1 driver

    this is awesome as these trucks are ideally sized for adding on hybrid technologies

  • http://www.boredquiz.com/personality_quiz/what-kind-of-driver-are-you-2008-09-06/1 driver

    this is awesome as these trucks are ideally sized for adding on hybrid technologies

  • ramblin101010

    Something here doesn’t quite add up. The size and weight of a high pressure accumulator needed to store signficant amounts of energy in compressed gas would be comparable to “bulky batteries”.

    So the accumulator can be little more than a start assist device that captures kinetic energy during braking. The overall efficiency could only be improved by 50% if the the vehicle is *continuously* starting and stopping. Hydraulic power transmission isn’t particulary efficient otherwise.

    More technical details would be useful.

  • ramblin101010

    Something here doesn’t quite add up. The size and weight of a high pressure accumulator needed to store signficant amounts of energy in compressed gas would be comparable to “bulky batteries”.

    So the accumulator can be little more than a start assist device that captures kinetic energy during braking. The overall efficiency could only be improved by 50% if the the vehicle is *continuously* starting and stopping. Hydraulic power transmission isn’t particulary efficient otherwise.

    More technical details would be useful.

  • ramblin101010

    Something here doesn’t quite add up. The size and weight of a high pressure accumulator needed to store signficant amounts of energy in compressed gas would be comparable to “bulky batteries”.

    So the accumulator can be little more than a start assist device that captures kinetic energy during braking. The overall efficiency could only be improved by 50% if the the vehicle is *continuously* starting and stopping. Hydraulic power transmission isn’t particulary efficient otherwise.

    More technical details would be useful.

  • ramblin101010

    Something here doesn’t quite add up. The size and weight of a high pressure accumulator needed to store signficant amounts of energy in compressed gas would be comparable to “bulky batteries”.

    So the accumulator can be little more than a start assist device that captures kinetic energy during braking. The overall efficiency could only be improved by 50% if the the vehicle is *continuously* starting and stopping. Hydraulic power transmission isn’t particulary efficient otherwise.

    More technical details would be useful.

  • HIERONYMUS AMATI NONYMUS

    Why not use carbon dioxide in air chamber and liquid carbon dioxide in hydraulic fluid line? Use CO2 that would otherwise be allowed to escape into atmosphere from natural-gas wells. As gaseous C02 is compressed it liquefies thus storing more energy than compressed nitrogen thus allowing use of lighter mechanism for same storage thus better power/weight ratio thus improved fuel mileage. Greenhouse gas would be contained inside truck rather than released into upper atmosphere.

  • HIERONYMUS AMATI NONYMUS

    Why not use carbon dioxide in air chamber and liquid carbon dioxide in hydraulic fluid line? Use CO2 that would otherwise be allowed to escape into atmosphere from natural-gas wells. As gaseous C02 is compressed it liquefies thus storing more energy than compressed nitrogen thus allowing use of lighter mechanism for same storage thus better power/weight ratio thus improved fuel mileage. Greenhouse gas would be contained inside truck rather than released into upper atmosphere.

  • Jerry

    I hope these lame measures to combat fictitious global warming don’t raise the cost of my packages.

    • http://Web logistics student

      Still thinking that now?

  • Jerry

    I hope these lame measures to combat fictitious global warming don’t raise the cost of my packages.

  • Jerry

    I hope these lame measures to combat fictitious global warming don’t raise the cost of my packages.

  • Jerry

    I hope these lame measures to combat fictitious global warming don’t raise the cost of my packages.

  • http://www.globalwarmingisreal.com/blog Tom Schueneman

    According to John Kargul, Director of Energy Transfer for the EPA office of Transportation and Air Quality, each accumulator tank on the prototype truck on display in Atlanta on Monday (high and low pressure) holds 44 gal each. 1/2 of which is nitrogen and the other half is common transmission fluid. Nitrogen is indeed the “spring”, as Kargul described it, in the system storing and releasing the potential energy. I’ve posted a video and graphic from UPS on the system on TriplePundit.com (www.triplepundit.com/pages/around-the-block-in-the-first–003672.php) and for more in-depth info:

    http://www.triplepundit.com/pages/ups-delivers-a-message-with-hh-003676.php (3P carried the live web feed from Atlanta and I was fortunate to be there to talk with the principals.)

  • http://www.globalwarmingisreal.com/blog Tom Schueneman

    According to John Kargul, Director of Energy Transfer for the EPA office of Transportation and Air Quality, each accumulator tank on the prototype truck on display in Atlanta on Monday (high and low pressure) holds 44 gal each. 1/2 of which is nitrogen and the other half is common transmission fluid. Nitrogen is indeed the “spring”, as Kargul described it, in the system storing and releasing the potential energy. I’ve posted a video and graphic from UPS on the system on TriplePundit.com (www.triplepundit.com/pages/around-the-block-in-the-first–003672.php) and for more in-depth info:

    http://www.triplepundit.com/pages/ups-delivers-a-message-with-hh-003676.php (3P carried the live web feed from Atlanta and I was fortunate to be there to talk with the principals.)

  • http://www.globalwarmingisreal.com/blog Tom Schueneman

    According to John Kargul, Director of Energy Transfer for the EPA office of Transportation and Air Quality, each accumulator tank on the prototype truck on display in Atlanta on Monday (high and low pressure) holds 44 gal each. 1/2 of which is nitrogen and the other half is common transmission fluid. Nitrogen is indeed the “spring”, as Kargul described it, in the system storing and releasing the potential energy. I’ve posted a video and graphic from UPS on the system on TriplePundit.com (www.triplepundit.com/pages/around-the-block-in-the-first–003672.php) and for more in-depth info:

    http://www.triplepundit.com/pages/ups-delivers-a-message-with-hh-003676.php (3P carried the live web feed from Atlanta and I was fortunate to be there to talk with the principals.)

  • http://www.outdo.cc treadmillfactory

    nice

  • http://www.outdo.cc treadmillfactory

    nice

  • http://www.outdo.cc treadmillfactory

    nice

  • lynnette McIntire

    A bit more about the announcement. Im from UPS:

    1) We are actually purchasing these vehicles. We’ve been testing them for the last 18 months. 2) the manufacturers are Eaton and Navistar. If you want to see some video and the press release, go to http://www.pressroom.ups.com

  • lynnette McIntire

    A bit more about the announcement. Im from UPS:

    1) We are actually purchasing these vehicles. We’ve been testing them for the last 18 months. 2) the manufacturers are Eaton and Navistar. If you want to see some video and the press release, go to http://www.pressroom.ups.com

  • lynnette McIntire

    A bit more about the announcement. Im from UPS:

    1) We are actually purchasing these vehicles. We’ve been testing them for the last 18 months. 2) the manufacturers are Eaton and Navistar. If you want to see some video and the press release, go to http://www.pressroom.ups.com

  • lynnette McIntire

    A bit more about the announcement. Im from UPS:

    1) We are actually purchasing these vehicles. We’ve been testing them for the last 18 months. 2) the manufacturers are Eaton and Navistar. If you want to see some video and the press release, go to http://www.pressroom.ups.com

  • lynnette McIntire

    A bit more about the announcement. Im from UPS:

    1) We are actually purchasing these vehicles. We’ve been testing them for the last 18 months. 2) the manufacturers are Eaton and Navistar. If you want to see some video and the press release, go to http://www.pressroom.ups.com

  • http://www.infotrucker.com Mike

    The hybrid truck looks awesome and green color is simply looking great.

  • http://www.infotrucker.com Mike

    The hybrid truck looks awesome and green color is simply looking great.

  • john

    A video of the Artemis Hybrid driving around a test track. Looks like they got some good results from a UK test center too.

  • john

    A video of the Artemis Hybrid driving around a test track. Looks like they got some good results from a UK test center too.

  • john

    A video of the Artemis Hybrid driving around a test track. Looks like they got some good results from a UK test center too.

  • john

    A video of the Artemis Hybrid driving around a test track. Looks like they got some good results from a UK test center too.

  • john

    A video of the Artemis Hybrid driving around a test track. Looks like they got some good results from a UK test center too.

  • Elle Belle

    I thought that Fed Ex did that first???

  • Elle Belle

    I thought that Fed Ex did that first???

  • Elle Belle

    I thought that Fed Ex did that first???

  • http://www.thebicycleworkshop.com Erik

    I got to drive in one of these trucks last year when they came through Portland, Maine. Pretty interesting system for sure. The engineers were from the EPA and were using UPS as a test platform. They said they had s similar system in a test Ford Expedition. In that they said their goal was to make an Expedition tow and perform as well as a stock model but using this technology and see how small an engine they could use. They were able to use the motor from the Ford Escort in the Expedition and still have it tow and perform the same as stock.

    I asked if they thought it would see production and they kind of laughed. The UPS truck maybe but the Ford, not too likely.

    Maybe they will wait until Toyota or Honda pick it up and run with it. Since they are the EPA they have to work with an American company so they have no choice.

    They also had other ideas they were working on like a crankshaft free engine where the pistons fire on both ends and shoot back and forth in the same cylinder. I didn’t totally understand how it actually got the power out of the engine on that one.

    Anyway, it’s the EPA whose developing this one.

  • http://www.thebicycleworkshop.com Erik

    I got to drive in one of these trucks last year when they came through Portland, Maine. Pretty interesting system for sure. The engineers were from the EPA and were using UPS as a test platform. They said they had s similar system in a test Ford Expedition. In that they said their goal was to make an Expedition tow and perform as well as a stock model but using this technology and see how small an engine they could use. They were able to use the motor from the Ford Escort in the Expedition and still have it tow and perform the same as stock.

    I asked if they thought it would see production and they kind of laughed. The UPS truck maybe but the Ford, not too likely.

    Maybe they will wait until Toyota or Honda pick it up and run with it. Since they are the EPA they have to work with an American company so they have no choice.

    They also had other ideas they were working on like a crankshaft free engine where the pistons fire on both ends and shoot back and forth in the same cylinder. I didn’t totally understand how it actually got the power out of the engine on that one.

    Anyway, it’s the EPA whose developing this one.

  • http://www.thebicycleworkshop.com Erik

    I got to drive in one of these trucks last year when they came through Portland, Maine. Pretty interesting system for sure. The engineers were from the EPA and were using UPS as a test platform. They said they had s similar system in a test Ford Expedition. In that they said their goal was to make an Expedition tow and perform as well as a stock model but using this technology and see how small an engine they could use. They were able to use the motor from the Ford Escort in the Expedition and still have it tow and perform the same as stock.

    I asked if they thought it would see production and they kind of laughed. The UPS truck maybe but the Ford, not too likely.

    Maybe they will wait until Toyota or Honda pick it up and run with it. Since they are the EPA they have to work with an American company so they have no choice.

    They also had other ideas they were working on like a crankshaft free engine where the pistons fire on both ends and shoot back and forth in the same cylinder. I didn’t totally understand how it actually got the power out of the engine on that one.

    Anyway, it’s the EPA whose developing this one.

  • http://www.thebicycleworkshop.com Erik

    I got to drive in one of these trucks last year when they came through Portland, Maine. Pretty interesting system for sure. The engineers were from the EPA and were using UPS as a test platform. They said they had s similar system in a test Ford Expedition. In that they said their goal was to make an Expedition tow and perform as well as a stock model but using this technology and see how small an engine they could use. They were able to use the motor from the Ford Escort in the Expedition and still have it tow and perform the same as stock.

    I asked if they thought it would see production and they kind of laughed. The UPS truck maybe but the Ford, not too likely.

    Maybe they will wait until Toyota or Honda pick it up and run with it. Since they are the EPA they have to work with an American company so they have no choice.

    They also had other ideas they were working on like a crankshaft free engine where the pistons fire on both ends and shoot back and forth in the same cylinder. I didn’t totally understand how it actually got the power out of the engine on that one.

    Anyway, it’s the EPA whose developing this one.

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