New Fiesta Gets 73 MPG, But Ford Says It’s Not For The U.S.

 

Back in July, Ford released the details of a new Fiesta it plans to begin selling this November. The new car is based on Ford’s ECOnetic platform and can get 63 mpg in the city and 73 mpg on the highway. So why is it only available in Europe? It’s a diesel, and Ford doesn’t think Americans will ever adopt diesel cars.

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According to Businessweek, Ford lists a littany of excuses why they could never market this car in the US. Chief among these excuses is that they don’t think they could ever sell enough of them to make a profit. Ford says that in order to produce them for the US market they’d have to build a new plant and then make at least 350,000 of them a year.

If there’s no way to make a profit on these cars and Americans won’t buy them, why are so many European and Asian car makers bringing these new “clean diesels” to the U.S. starting next year? When I see news that Mercedes, Nissan, Volkswagen and even Honda are all building clean diesel cars with excellent fuel economy for the US market, Ford’s excuses start to seem pretty hollow.





Why is it that in the face of going bankrupt, U.S. car makers are so willing to maintain the status quo and slowly die a painful and agonizing death? Look, I understand some basic economics and that a company that is doing its shareholders right won’t take unnecessary risks, but the time for trepidation has past. Get on board or risk losing everything.

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Meanwhile, all I can do is hang my head and shake it. I want to be able to buy American cars again. In fact, every time one of the top U.S. car makers has some crazy desperation sale, I go online and take a look at the line-up… but I can never find a car I’d actually buy.

It’s not that the cars are ugly, or that I don’t trust their reliability — it’s that what I’m looking for is a fuel efficient vehicle that won’t break the bank and looks nice. And when I say “fuel efficient,” I don’t mean 30 mpg. I don’t even mean 40 mpg (my puny Yaris can already pull that one off). I want something with a drastic fuel economy improvement.

I want a car that in some way shows I care about the planet and understand that our future and our childrens’ future depends on drastically changing our habits now. But I also want a car that shows I support buying locally (in this case domestically) and that supports the economy of my own country.

And I know there are millions of other people like me. That’s why I want US car makers to wake up and start selling the cars people want.

You see, in my world I have a fantasy in which I purchase a nice little chunk of farmable land — say 10 acres — grow my own oilseed (like Camelina), crush it and make all of the biodiesel I would ever need (plus some to give my friends). In my fantasy, my operation would be powered completely off of wind, solar and geothermal and I could continue to make my own fuel even if the rest of the world went to hell in a handbasket.

So please Ford (or GM or Chrysler), make my dream a possibility. Take some chances. Stop applying band-aids in a last ditch defense of crusty old shareholders and go on the offensive. That’s how you built the company in the first place, and that’s how you can save it.

Posts Related to the Re-tooling of the US Auto Industry and Clean Diesels:

Image Credit: Ford

Source: Businessweek





About the Author

Not your traditional car guy.

  • Steve-O

    Unfortunately, Ford may be correct. I am no elitist but I think the average american doesn’t see the incredible value in the new diesel vehicles. But I don’t agree with them not bringing this car here. I am kicking myself for not buying the VW Golf Diesel back in 2005 when they still had one here. Ford should have this car as we need good high mileage diesels in our mix so consumers can have choices.

  • Steve-O

    Unfortunately, Ford may be correct. I am no elitist but I think the average american doesn’t see the incredible value in the new diesel vehicles. But I don’t agree with them not bringing this car here. I am kicking myself for not buying the VW Golf Diesel back in 2005 when they still had one here. Ford should have this car as we need good high mileage diesels in our mix so consumers can have choices.

  • Jay Tee

    So, they took away the several thousand comments that were here a day ago. They certainly were’nt as kind as ‘Steve-Os’ comment- for good reason.

  • Jay Tee

    So, they took away the several thousand comments that were here a day ago. They certainly were’nt as kind as ‘Steve-Os’ comment- for good reason.

  • Nick Chambers

    Not sure what you’re referring to Jay Tee?

  • BackFromItaly

    I just got back from an Italian vacation where I drove a Jetta TDI wagon that got well over 50 miles per gallon. I’m not buying any car in the US until I have the same range of choices that every Italian, Frenchman, German, etc. has on an everyday basis when it comes to shopping for high-mileage cars.

    Is there any truth to the argument that cars like the Fiesta aren’t sold in the US due to small differences between US/California regulations and European Union regulations? In other words, could the US government “call the bluff” of car companies by passing an emergency measure to allow any car to be sold in the US, as long as it conforms with US *or* EU regulations?

    US car companies should be able to choose either a) current US regulations, or b) current EU regulations under which their cars would be accepted for registration in all 50 states. What could possibly be the negative impact of using EU regulations? Has anyone done a thorough comparison between these two sets of regulations to see exactly what the differences are? I haven’t read ANY coverage on just exactly what the delta is between US / California regulations and EU regulations. Somehow, I don’t think a temporary adoption of EU regulations would suddenly plunge the US roads into a state of heightened danger, increased auto-accident fatalities and pollution.

    Instead, selling EU-compliant cars in the US would allow us to get cars like the Fiesta next year, instead of the oft-quoted “3 model years from today”.

  • BackFromItaly

    I just got back from an Italian vacation where I drove a Jetta TDI wagon that got well over 50 miles per gallon. I’m not buying any car in the US until I have the same range of choices that every Italian, Frenchman, German, etc. has on an everyday basis when it comes to shopping for high-mileage cars.

    Is there any truth to the argument that cars like the Fiesta aren’t sold in the US due to small differences between US/California regulations and European Union regulations? In other words, could the US government “call the bluff” of car companies by passing an emergency measure to allow any car to be sold in the US, as long as it conforms with US *or* EU regulations?

    US car companies should be able to choose either a) current US regulations, or b) current EU regulations under which their cars would be accepted for registration in all 50 states. What could possibly be the negative impact of using EU regulations? Has anyone done a thorough comparison between these two sets of regulations to see exactly what the differences are? I haven’t read ANY coverage on just exactly what the delta is between US / California regulations and EU regulations. Somehow, I don’t think a temporary adoption of EU regulations would suddenly plunge the US roads into a state of heightened danger, increased auto-accident fatalities and pollution.

    Instead, selling EU-compliant cars in the US would allow us to get cars like the Fiesta next year, instead of the oft-quoted “3 model years from today”.

  • Nick Chambers

    Fully agree with BackFromItaly… and perhaps food for a future blog post. Thanks!

  • ryan

    the us govt wont let these high milage cars sell due to the decrease in tax revenue they would receive from gas taxes at the pump. Think about it, the govt makes somewhere in the neighborhood of 40cents per gallon. Increase mpg overnight by selling these cars which most americans would jump at in a heartbeat with the price of gas today and the govt gas taxes are decreased drastically. This is why Ford isn’t selling these in the US. They are restricted by the US govt. That’s my logic…and i’m sticking to it. We will probably see a car like this in America when cars are taxed on miles driven, similar to toll roads.

  • ryan

    the us govt wont let these high milage cars sell due to the decrease in tax revenue they would receive from gas taxes at the pump. Think about it, the govt makes somewhere in the neighborhood of 40cents per gallon. Increase mpg overnight by selling these cars which most americans would jump at in a heartbeat with the price of gas today and the govt gas taxes are decreased drastically. This is why Ford isn’t selling these in the US. They are restricted by the US govt. That’s my logic…and i’m sticking to it. We will probably see a car like this in America when cars are taxed on miles driven, similar to toll roads.

  • Aea

    Seriously? You believe that the government is holding back car companies so they can make forty cents on tax per gallon of gasoline? While in turn trying to prop up the US economy which is strained by high gasoline prices? Your logic makes no sense, unless we’re going on conspiracy theory logic here where the government always has some sinister plan.

  • Aea

    Seriously? You believe that the government is holding back car companies so they can make forty cents on tax per gallon of gasoline? While in turn trying to prop up the US economy which is strained by high gasoline prices? Your logic makes no sense, unless we’re going on conspiracy theory logic here where the government always has some sinister plan.

  • “I want a car that in some way shows I care about the planet and understand that our future and our childrens’ future depends on drastically changing our habits now. But I also want a car that shows I support buying locally (in this case domestically) and that supports the economy of my own country.”

    Funny–I guess that’s why we drive different cars. I want a care that says: Fuck you. Don’t bother me. I’m rich, and you’re not.

  • “I want a car that in some way shows I care about the planet and understand that our future and our childrens’ future depends on drastically changing our habits now. But I also want a car that shows I support buying locally (in this case domestically) and that supports the economy of my own country.”

    Funny–I guess that’s why we drive different cars. I want a care that says: Fuck you. Don’t bother me. I’m rich, and you’re not.

  • mrbrill

    Taxing based on miles driven would be a bad idea as it would discourage consumers from considering cars for economical/environmental reasons. I believe many countries in Europe and Asia (Japan at least) tax based on engine size and then of course at the pump as well. No wonder consumers in other countries have taken a more economical and environmental approach to car buying. If our car manufacturers here would have been motivated by an interest in such cars, we would have wider range of choices. However, car manufacturers like any other manufacturer has to have insight and make decisions based on long-term outlook and not just making short-sighted decisions. No wonder car manufacturers are in the position they are in…

  • mrbrill

    Taxing based on miles driven would be a bad idea as it would discourage consumers from considering cars for economical/environmental reasons. I believe many countries in Europe and Asia (Japan at least) tax based on engine size and then of course at the pump as well. No wonder consumers in other countries have taken a more economical and environmental approach to car buying. If our car manufacturers here would have been motivated by an interest in such cars, we would have wider range of choices. However, car manufacturers like any other manufacturer has to have insight and make decisions based on long-term outlook and not just making short-sighted decisions. No wonder car manufacturers are in the position they are in…

  • I don’t know guys….Here in India…Fiesta gives better mileage than 75mpg…..Ford claims a mileage of about 22km/litre…which I guess is about 84mpg….yeah this figures are for disel cars…..And tell you what Skoda Octavia that I own also gives about the same mileage…..diff the Fiesta is a 1.4 litre engine..and Skoda is a 1.9 litre engine

  • I don’t know guys….Here in India…Fiesta gives better mileage than 75mpg…..Ford claims a mileage of about 22km/litre…which I guess is about 84mpg….yeah this figures are for disel cars…..And tell you what Skoda Octavia that I own also gives about the same mileage…..diff the Fiesta is a 1.4 litre engine..and Skoda is a 1.9 litre engine

  • I don’t want to break your euphoria, but as a German currently driving a VW Lupo (which was advertised as a “3-Liter-Auto”, meaning it uses 3 litres on 100 km, or – using the US Scale – around 80 MPG), I just want to point out that diesel engines have problems of their own…

    For example, the exhaust fumes are more toxic than those of Otto motors, and this bars us from driving our merry diesel engine to several city centers (introduced this year, it’s called “Umweltzone”). Additionally, diesel cars are subject to a much higher taxation.

    BTW: Don’t try to look for a VW Lupo – it was discontinued in 2005 because of low interest. VW is about to create a 1-Liter-Auto (or 240 MPG car) in 2009, tough.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Lupo

  • I don’t want to break your euphoria, but as a German currently driving a VW Lupo (which was advertised as a “3-Liter-Auto”, meaning it uses 3 litres on 100 km, or – using the US Scale – around 80 MPG), I just want to point out that diesel engines have problems of their own…

    For example, the exhaust fumes are more toxic than those of Otto motors, and this bars us from driving our merry diesel engine to several city centers (introduced this year, it’s called “Umweltzone”). Additionally, diesel cars are subject to a much higher taxation.

    BTW: Don’t try to look for a VW Lupo – it was discontinued in 2005 because of low interest. VW is about to create a 1-Liter-Auto (or 240 MPG car) in 2009, tough.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volkswagen_Lupo

  • 7rans

    I fully agree with you.

    However, the American buyer is also part of the problem. Take for instance my mother. Always going on about environmental issues, but when it came to buy a new car she goes and buys a huge “mini”-van (less than 20mpg). One woman driving 30mins up and down US1 each week, and she buys a tank to do it in. Why? She says she feels safer. In America, as much a people might talk about doing the right thing, when the tires hit the road they think only their own little world.

  • 7rans

    I fully agree with you.

    However, the American buyer is also part of the problem. Take for instance my mother. Always going on about environmental issues, but when it came to buy a new car she goes and buys a huge “mini”-van (less than 20mpg). One woman driving 30mins up and down US1 each week, and she buys a tank to do it in. Why? She says she feels safer. In America, as much a people might talk about doing the right thing, when the tires hit the road they think only their own little world.

  • Antonio Andolini

    Diesel Engines aren’t cost effective according to this:

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/services/newspaper/printedition/tuesday/orl-a2gaswatch0908sep09,0,3942697.story

    “Gunnar Harmann, Ford’s executive engineer in charge of compact cars such as the Focus, argues that the big advantages of diesel — fuel efficiency and low cost of ownership; are disappearing. Advanced gasoline engines using turbocharging and direct fuel injection are about to become real competitors to diesel.”

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080905.WBdriving20080905101828/WBStory/WBdriving

    Ford thinks more efficient gas engines, which can also virtually turn off when stopped are the way to go. Also, oil companies have no incentive to build more diesel refineries…car companies are handcuffed to gasoline $ vs. diesel.

    It will be interesting to see if Ford will truly deliver more efficient gas engines.

  • Antonio Andolini

    Diesel Engines aren’t cost effective according to this:

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/services/newspaper/printedition/tuesday/orl-a2gaswatch0908sep09,0,3942697.story

    “Gunnar Harmann, Ford’s executive engineer in charge of compact cars such as the Focus, argues that the big advantages of diesel — fuel efficiency and low cost of ownership; are disappearing. Advanced gasoline engines using turbocharging and direct fuel injection are about to become real competitors to diesel.”

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080905.WBdriving20080905101828/WBStory/WBdriving

    Ford thinks more efficient gas engines, which can also virtually turn off when stopped are the way to go. Also, oil companies have no incentive to build more diesel refineries…car companies are handcuffed to gasoline $ vs. diesel.

    It will be interesting to see if Ford will truly deliver more efficient gas engines.

  • Antonio Andolini

    Diesel Engines aren’t cost effective according to this:

    http://www.orlandosentinel.com/services/newspaper/printedition/tuesday/orl-a2gaswatch0908sep09,0,3942697.story

    “Gunnar Harmann, Ford’s executive engineer in charge of compact cars such as the Focus, argues that the big advantages of diesel — fuel efficiency and low cost of ownership; are disappearing. Advanced gasoline engines using turbocharging and direct fuel injection are about to become real competitors to diesel.”

    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20080905.WBdriving20080905101828/WBStory/WBdriving

    Ford thinks more efficient gas engines, which can also virtually turn off when stopped are the way to go. Also, oil companies have no incentive to build more diesel refineries…car companies are handcuffed to gasoline $ vs. diesel.

    It will be interesting to see if Ford will truly deliver more efficient gas engines.

  • Phil

    Sorry to burst your 10 acre bio-diesel bubble, but no car manufacturer that I know of warrant their Direct Injection Diesel engines for 100% bio-fuel. VW used to, but ran into problems with the high pressure injection pumps clogging; VW now only allow up to 5% bio-diesel content if you want to keep your engine warranty.

    Now, getting an old Diesel Volvo or something – that would be a good choice, those things run for years and can accept 100% bio-diesel from what I have heard.

  • Phil

    Sorry to burst your 10 acre bio-diesel bubble, but no car manufacturer that I know of warrant their Direct Injection Diesel engines for 100% bio-fuel. VW used to, but ran into problems with the high pressure injection pumps clogging; VW now only allow up to 5% bio-diesel content if you want to keep your engine warranty.

    Now, getting an old Diesel Volvo or something – that would be a good choice, those things run for years and can accept 100% bio-diesel from what I have heard.

  • Bob

    Please remember that this car will not achieve 63mpg in the US. It can’t – but for any reason you imagined.

    We in Europe use the proper imperial gallon of 4.55 litres (Give or take a little). You guys use 3.8 Litre Gallons. So you will only get 54mpg.

    Sorry its been so long since Europe got one over on you so I can’t resist:

    HA HA HA We’ll get 63 mpg, you’ll only get 54mpg – IF Ford ever launch the car in the US that is.

  • Bob

    Please remember that this car will not achieve 63mpg in the US. It can’t – but for any reason you imagined.

    We in Europe use the proper imperial gallon of 4.55 litres (Give or take a little). You guys use 3.8 Litre Gallons. So you will only get 54mpg.

    Sorry its been so long since Europe got one over on you so I can’t resist:

    HA HA HA We’ll get 63 mpg, you’ll only get 54mpg – IF Ford ever launch the car in the US that is.

  • Too bad for you Ford…

    oh… ok. So I suppose this is the reason behind the 50 billion dollar bail-out that Ford was allow to doctor into the last energy bill???

    You’ve got to be kidding me! Ford execs are a bunch of crooks. Stop trying to sell your garbage to people. Your company is finished. You can’t compete with any one else any more, and… now that we are getting great American Electric Vehicles from Goss132, and Tesla I see no point in even humoring Ford with any press space at all.

  • Too bad for you Ford…

    oh… ok. So I suppose this is the reason behind the 50 billion dollar bail-out that Ford was allow to doctor into the last energy bill???

    You’ve got to be kidding me! Ford execs are a bunch of crooks. Stop trying to sell your garbage to people. Your company is finished. You can’t compete with any one else any more, and… now that we are getting great American Electric Vehicles from Goss132, and Tesla I see no point in even humoring Ford with any press space at all.

  • Too bad for you Ford…

    oh… ok. So I suppose this is the reason behind the 50 billion dollar bail-out that Ford was allow to doctor into the last energy bill???

    You’ve got to be kidding me! Ford execs are a bunch of crooks. Stop trying to sell your garbage to people. Your company is finished. You can’t compete with any one else any more, and… now that we are getting great American Electric Vehicles from Goss132, and Tesla I see no point in even humoring Ford with any press space at all.

  • Jack

    There is a US market for these cars. I can’t believe Ford (and others) are not bringing these cars here.

    Keep the Mustang GT and the SUVs, but give us something we can drive to work.

  • Jack

    There is a US market for these cars. I can’t believe Ford (and others) are not bringing these cars here.

    Keep the Mustang GT and the SUVs, but give us something we can drive to work.

  • WantChoices

    “Funny–I guess that’s why we drive different cars. I want a care that says: Fuck you. Don’t bother me. I’m rich, and you’re not.”

    Happily (I guess) for you, you have plenty of those cars.

    For those of us who, regardless of our income, want something a little more responsible, the choices are slimmer.

  • WantChoices

    “Funny–I guess that’s why we drive different cars. I want a care that says: Fuck you. Don’t bother me. I’m rich, and you’re not.”

    Happily (I guess) for you, you have plenty of those cars.

    For those of us who, regardless of our income, want something a little more responsible, the choices are slimmer.

  • WantChoices

    “Funny–I guess that’s why we drive different cars. I want a care that says: Fuck you. Don’t bother me. I’m rich, and you’re not.”

    Happily (I guess) for you, you have plenty of those cars.

    For those of us who, regardless of our income, want something a little more responsible, the choices are slimmer.

  • Jiff Minor

    LOL, imagine that! Not for the US. Of course not because big oil has the right people in their back pocket. Profit is king!

    Jiff

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • Jiff Minor

    LOL, imagine that! Not for the US. Of course not because big oil has the right people in their back pocket. Profit is king!

    Jiff

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • revela7i0ns

    The number one reason behind why they wont sell it in America is because the American Government wont allow it . The American Government doesn’t give a care in the world on whats better for the earth all they care about is money. This car would be a hit in America with its “green movement” but the government would loose so much money if a tiny percent of the population drove this car. Plain and simple I’m American and I think my government doesn’t have a care in the world for anything but money.

  • revela7i0ns

    The number one reason behind why they wont sell it in America is because the American Government wont allow it . The American Government doesn’t give a care in the world on whats better for the earth all they care about is money. This car would be a hit in America with its “green movement” but the government would loose so much money if a tiny percent of the population drove this car. Plain and simple I’m American and I think my government doesn’t have a care in the world for anything but money.

  • revela7i0ns

    The number one reason behind why they wont sell it in America is because the American Government wont allow it . The American Government doesn’t give a care in the world on whats better for the earth all they care about is money. This car would be a hit in America with its “green movement” but the government would loose so much money if a tiny percent of the population drove this car. Plain and simple I’m American and I think my government doesn’t have a care in the world for anything but money.

  • John

    Hey folks, Instead of whining about it, why not do something about it. CONTACT FORD AND TELL THEM YOU WANT IT!

    Here’s the link: https://secure.ford.com/footer/contact-ford/contact-us-email?contactMainTopic=VehicleServiceIssues

  • John

    Hey folks, Instead of whining about it, why not do something about it. CONTACT FORD AND TELL THEM YOU WANT IT!

    Here’s the link: https://secure.ford.com/footer/contact-ford/contact-us-email?contactMainTopic=VehicleServiceIssues

  • John

    Hey folks, Instead of whining about it, why not do something about it. CONTACT FORD AND TELL THEM YOU WANT IT!

    Here’s the link: https://secure.ford.com/footer/contact-ford/contact-us-email?contactMainTopic=VehicleServiceIssues

  • Fani

    Prakash – your math seems wrong.

    For Indian car 22km/liter is 13.75m/liter

    1gal=3.78liters

    so 13.75m/liter =~ 52mpg.

    Still good, but nowhere near 84mpg.

    Plus most cars in India are stinking pollutants and not maintained well, so end up giving something like 25-30mpg.

    I was recently in Hyderabad and its the worst city in India – pollution is like a bad overhanging fog all over the city. How can Indians put up with this is beyond me. There’s no concern/regard for the environment at all.

  • Fani

    Prakash – your math seems wrong.

    For Indian car 22km/liter is 13.75m/liter

    1gal=3.78liters

    so 13.75m/liter =~ 52mpg.

    Still good, but nowhere near 84mpg.

    Plus most cars in India are stinking pollutants and not maintained well, so end up giving something like 25-30mpg.

    I was recently in Hyderabad and its the worst city in India – pollution is like a bad overhanging fog all over the city. How can Indians put up with this is beyond me. There’s no concern/regard for the environment at all.

  • Doomwaffle

    I always figured profit was good, and right now America needs 73 mpg…

  • Doomwaffle

    I always figured profit was good, and right now America needs 73 mpg…

  • MotS

    You have seen the “Crazy desperation sales” but want a car that gets better mileage. What’s your standard? Use total cost of ownership. I purchased a 2008 Chevrolet Aveo for under $9,000 after interest. It makes 28 miles per gallon. Let’s compare this with a $13,000 car that makes 40 miles per gallon. $4,000 price difference is 1000 gallons of gas. So, my Aveo has traveled 28,000 miles already. Then, for every 1,000 miles, you spend $100 and I spend $143. We break even after 93,000 miles (total). At $8 a gallon, it’s still 46 thousand miles.

    So, glad you’re spending so much on your car to appear to care. Building a car takes energy just like driving it does, and I’ve saved more energy than you.

  • MotS

    You have seen the “Crazy desperation sales” but want a car that gets better mileage. What’s your standard? Use total cost of ownership. I purchased a 2008 Chevrolet Aveo for under $9,000 after interest. It makes 28 miles per gallon. Let’s compare this with a $13,000 car that makes 40 miles per gallon. $4,000 price difference is 1000 gallons of gas. So, my Aveo has traveled 28,000 miles already. Then, for every 1,000 miles, you spend $100 and I spend $143. We break even after 93,000 miles (total). At $8 a gallon, it’s still 46 thousand miles.

    So, glad you’re spending so much on your car to appear to care. Building a car takes energy just like driving it does, and I’ve saved more energy than you.

  • Matthew

    Americans will never embrace diesel. Volkswagen has been selling diesel cars here for a long time and they have an incredibly low percentage of their sales. With diesel you are just trading pollution anyway. An alarming number of diesel mechanics and bus drivers have emphyzema from the particulate matter in diesel exhaust.

  • Matthew

    Americans will never embrace diesel. Volkswagen has been selling diesel cars here for a long time and they have an incredibly low percentage of their sales. With diesel you are just trading pollution anyway. An alarming number of diesel mechanics and bus drivers have emphyzema from the particulate matter in diesel exhaust.

  • Andy

    I agree with your “fantasy” 100%. I have been wondering for a long time why some of the European vehicles our domestic companies produce are not marketed here. I could care less what specific fuel goes into my vehicle, but it should be efficient, look nice, and have enough space for the family. I don’t think it should be this hard either!

  • Andy

    I agree with your “fantasy” 100%. I have been wondering for a long time why some of the European vehicles our domestic companies produce are not marketed here. I could care less what specific fuel goes into my vehicle, but it should be efficient, look nice, and have enough space for the family. I don’t think it should be this hard either!

  • Andy

    I agree with your “fantasy” 100%. I have been wondering for a long time why some of the European vehicles our domestic companies produce are not marketed here. I could care less what specific fuel goes into my vehicle, but it should be efficient, look nice, and have enough space for the family. I don’t think it should be this hard either!

  • Its not the govt that is restricting these cars, its the big oil. big oil has had their hands dipping into the automobile companies pockets for a long time. every time a major turn for the better seems to come its either caboshed or estimated 10 years away. they are waiting for themselves to get their rights on the next big fuel and then let us adopt soemthing new.

    fuel and utilities should be run non profit by the government. i work for a water company in my state and that is how we are run, power and gas should be the same, instead of corps giving CEO’s multi million salaries and bonuses, that they have already openly said they would not give up. fuck this country, capitalism is great when selling shoes not life essentials.

  • Its not the govt that is restricting these cars, its the big oil. big oil has had their hands dipping into the automobile companies pockets for a long time. every time a major turn for the better seems to come its either caboshed or estimated 10 years away. they are waiting for themselves to get their rights on the next big fuel and then let us adopt soemthing new.

    fuel and utilities should be run non profit by the government. i work for a water company in my state and that is how we are run, power and gas should be the same, instead of corps giving CEO’s multi million salaries and bonuses, that they have already openly said they would not give up. fuck this country, capitalism is great when selling shoes not life essentials.

  • The issue is also that states such as California are against diesels, unless they meet some ridiculously high anti-pollution standard.

    Way to go California!

  • The issue is also that states such as California are against diesels, unless they meet some ridiculously high anti-pollution standard.

    Way to go California!

  • The issue is also that states such as California are against diesels, unless they meet some ridiculously high anti-pollution standard.

    Way to go California!

  • anonymous

    I don’t think US auto companies are witholding fuel-efficient cars out of stupidity, or government blockage, or because they’re out of touch with reality…..although the government losing lots of tax money from less gas purchased sounds like it could be a factor.

    I believe the real underlying reason is that if they produced a 6 passenger vehicle that got 70-80pg, people would buy it, then never buy another vehicle.

    Also, it seems logical that the CEOs and board members of automakers probably hold a good deal of shares in OIL companies, and making fuel efficient cars would shrink their profits from oil, as well….not to mention pissing off their Saudi masters.

    they make more money off of us if they only give us crap cars, because we have to keep buying them when they die in 5 years, as they’re engineered to do (I’m referring to the concept of “planned obsolescence” )

  • anonymous

    I don’t think US auto companies are witholding fuel-efficient cars out of stupidity, or government blockage, or because they’re out of touch with reality…..although the government losing lots of tax money from less gas purchased sounds like it could be a factor.

    I believe the real underlying reason is that if they produced a 6 passenger vehicle that got 70-80pg, people would buy it, then never buy another vehicle.

    Also, it seems logical that the CEOs and board members of automakers probably hold a good deal of shares in OIL companies, and making fuel efficient cars would shrink their profits from oil, as well….not to mention pissing off their Saudi masters.

    they make more money off of us if they only give us crap cars, because we have to keep buying them when they die in 5 years, as they’re engineered to do (I’m referring to the concept of “planned obsolescence” )

  • anonymous

    I don’t think US auto companies are witholding fuel-efficient cars out of stupidity, or government blockage, or because they’re out of touch with reality…..although the government losing lots of tax money from less gas purchased sounds like it could be a factor.

    I believe the real underlying reason is that if they produced a 6 passenger vehicle that got 70-80pg, people would buy it, then never buy another vehicle.

    Also, it seems logical that the CEOs and board members of automakers probably hold a good deal of shares in OIL companies, and making fuel efficient cars would shrink their profits from oil, as well….not to mention pissing off their Saudi masters.

    they make more money off of us if they only give us crap cars, because we have to keep buying them when they die in 5 years, as they’re engineered to do (I’m referring to the concept of “planned obsolescence” )

  • none

    “Ford’s excuses start to seem pretty hollow.” Yeah, they are just lazy… Their excusess seem valid. That sounds like a lot of overhead to bring this car to America. If you don’t like it, tough beans Gas2.

  • none

    “Ford’s excuses start to seem pretty hollow.” Yeah, they are just lazy… Their excusess seem valid. That sounds like a lot of overhead to bring this car to America. If you don’t like it, tough beans Gas2.

  • baconator

    They’re just begging for more government money. Oh, we’re so poor, we’ll lose our shirt … the taxpayers must pay us so we can afford to make cars!

  • baconator

    They’re just begging for more government money. Oh, we’re so poor, we’ll lose our shirt … the taxpayers must pay us so we can afford to make cars!

  • baconator

    They’re just begging for more government money. Oh, we’re so poor, we’ll lose our shirt … the taxpayers must pay us so we can afford to make cars!

  • I get 36.6 cbpm (calories burned per mile) on my bike. Kill 2 birds with one stone. Buy a bike and get in shape, save the earth (and your pocketbook) at the same time… errr, make that 3 birds with one stone.

  • I get 36.6 cbpm (calories burned per mile) on my bike. Kill 2 birds with one stone. Buy a bike and get in shape, save the earth (and your pocketbook) at the same time… errr, make that 3 birds with one stone.

  • Pingback: New VW Golf BlueMotion Gets 74 MPG and 99g/KM: On Sale Mid-2009 : Gas 2.0()

  • pat

    Ford won’t release it in USA because it would be something the public demands, desires and would go crazy over…they are too interested in padding their pockets at the upper corporate level with sales of inefficient trucks, SUVs and cars thinking the American public is illiterate and ignorant…well that is why American car makers are failing…people have wanted for a long time efficiency and reliability and now buy foreign because that is who is providing it…Americans are not all into being mesmerized by Madison Avenue advertising showing trucks, SUVs and cars that get crap for miles per gallon and pollute like crazy…I want an American made car that gets fantastic miles per gallon that is reliable and comfortable without being outrageously expensive.

  • pat

    Ford won’t release it in USA because it would be something the public demands, desires and would go crazy over…they are too interested in padding their pockets at the upper corporate level with sales of inefficient trucks, SUVs and cars thinking the American public is illiterate and ignorant…well that is why American car makers are failing…people have wanted for a long time efficiency and reliability and now buy foreign because that is who is providing it…Americans are not all into being mesmerized by Madison Avenue advertising showing trucks, SUVs and cars that get crap for miles per gallon and pollute like crazy…I want an American made car that gets fantastic miles per gallon that is reliable and comfortable without being outrageously expensive.

  • pat

    Ford won’t release it in USA because it would be something the public demands, desires and would go crazy over…they are too interested in padding their pockets at the upper corporate level with sales of inefficient trucks, SUVs and cars thinking the American public is illiterate and ignorant…well that is why American car makers are failing…people have wanted for a long time efficiency and reliability and now buy foreign because that is who is providing it…Americans are not all into being mesmerized by Madison Avenue advertising showing trucks, SUVs and cars that get crap for miles per gallon and pollute like crazy…I want an American made car that gets fantastic miles per gallon that is reliable and comfortable without being outrageously expensive.

  • BackFromItaly

    OK, since my last comment I’ve done some (basic) research.

    The issue appears to be that there are two sets of auto regulations in the world. One set of regulations for the US (NTSA) and one for the rest of the world — called ECE. The ECE regulations are used by 52 countries, including the European Union nations and Japan.

    Check out Wikipedia entries for ECE auto regulation or NTSA — the facts are all there. ECE regulations have actually produced SAFER cars than the US-only NTSA regulations over the past 30 years (as measured by passenger fatalities per mile driven).

    Why is NO ONE in the mass media discussing the stupidity of only the US requiring NTSA regulations, while the ENTIRE world can make do with ECE regulations? And oh, yeah, our Federal Government and the EU have been trying to “harmonize” these two sets of regulations since, oh, 1958, with no discernible progress…huh?

    Given that the Feds are about to pass a $50 billion bail-out plan for Detroit, I don’t think that there’s a conspiracy afoot to make consumers pay more at the gas pump. I do see massive incompetence at a basic level — like the inability to adopt ECE regulations. Or at least, to let auto manufacturers choose either NTSA or ECE regulations to manufacture their cars under.

    As for diesel not being popular due to its higher price per gallon, that doesn’t make any sense. If I can drive a car that get 3x the mileage per gallon, and pay 25% more for each gallon, why wouldn’t I?

    Nick, I think this is one area that bloggers like yourself have to cover in more detail — it’s time to scrap the US-only approach to regulations that has plainly failed, and adopt ECE regulations — in other words, regulate car manufacturers like every other country on earth does. Only then can we start seeing all those great overseas cars come into the US market.

  • BackFromItaly

    OK, since my last comment I’ve done some (basic) research.

    The issue appears to be that there are two sets of auto regulations in the world. One set of regulations for the US (NTSA) and one for the rest of the world — called ECE. The ECE regulations are used by 52 countries, including the European Union nations and Japan.

    Check out Wikipedia entries for ECE auto regulation or NTSA — the facts are all there. ECE regulations have actually produced SAFER cars than the US-only NTSA regulations over the past 30 years (as measured by passenger fatalities per mile driven).

    Why is NO ONE in the mass media discussing the stupidity of only the US requiring NTSA regulations, while the ENTIRE world can make do with ECE regulations? And oh, yeah, our Federal Government and the EU have been trying to “harmonize” these two sets of regulations since, oh, 1958, with no discernible progress…huh?

    Given that the Feds are about to pass a $50 billion bail-out plan for Detroit, I don’t think that there’s a conspiracy afoot to make consumers pay more at the gas pump. I do see massive incompetence at a basic level — like the inability to adopt ECE regulations. Or at least, to let auto manufacturers choose either NTSA or ECE regulations to manufacture their cars under.

    As for diesel not being popular due to its higher price per gallon, that doesn’t make any sense. If I can drive a car that get 3x the mileage per gallon, and pay 25% more for each gallon, why wouldn’t I?

    Nick, I think this is one area that bloggers like yourself have to cover in more detail — it’s time to scrap the US-only approach to regulations that has plainly failed, and adopt ECE regulations — in other words, regulate car manufacturers like every other country on earth does. Only then can we start seeing all those great overseas cars come into the US market.

  • BackFromItaly

    OK, since my last comment I’ve done some (basic) research.

    The issue appears to be that there are two sets of auto regulations in the world. One set of regulations for the US (NTSA) and one for the rest of the world — called ECE. The ECE regulations are used by 52 countries, including the European Union nations and Japan.

    Check out Wikipedia entries for ECE auto regulation or NTSA — the facts are all there. ECE regulations have actually produced SAFER cars than the US-only NTSA regulations over the past 30 years (as measured by passenger fatalities per mile driven).

    Why is NO ONE in the mass media discussing the stupidity of only the US requiring NTSA regulations, while the ENTIRE world can make do with ECE regulations? And oh, yeah, our Federal Government and the EU have been trying to “harmonize” these two sets of regulations since, oh, 1958, with no discernible progress…huh?

    Given that the Feds are about to pass a $50 billion bail-out plan for Detroit, I don’t think that there’s a conspiracy afoot to make consumers pay more at the gas pump. I do see massive incompetence at a basic level — like the inability to adopt ECE regulations. Or at least, to let auto manufacturers choose either NTSA or ECE regulations to manufacture their cars under.

    As for diesel not being popular due to its higher price per gallon, that doesn’t make any sense. If I can drive a car that get 3x the mileage per gallon, and pay 25% more for each gallon, why wouldn’t I?

    Nick, I think this is one area that bloggers like yourself have to cover in more detail — it’s time to scrap the US-only approach to regulations that has plainly failed, and adopt ECE regulations — in other words, regulate car manufacturers like every other country on earth does. Only then can we start seeing all those great overseas cars come into the US market.

  • Nick Chambers

    BackFromItaly,

    There’s certainly seems to be some momentum here, so I’ll get on that when I have some time to do a little more in depth research. But I love the topic and am sure there’s a wealth of issues out there to discover related to how screwed up the US system is.

    Thanks again for your input and story idea. I love it.

  • Use the above link to contact Ford and tell them what you think about this issue! We can change their mind!

  • Use the above link to contact Ford and tell them what you think about this issue! We can change their mind!

  • Use the above link to contact Ford and tell them what you think about this issue! We can change their mind!

  • stlwest

    Yeah,

    Wouldn’t want to switch production at a plant they already have, gotta open a new plant, can’t run off 10,000 and see how they sell.

    I really think the US is going to be without a major auto manufacturer soon. When you lose close to your market cap in 1 quarter well, I’m not a genius but I don’t think that is heading anywhere but to be acquired. Maybe Uncle Sam wants to build cars as well as make home loans?

  • stlwest

    Yeah,

    Wouldn’t want to switch production at a plant they already have, gotta open a new plant, can’t run off 10,000 and see how they sell.

    I really think the US is going to be without a major auto manufacturer soon. When you lose close to your market cap in 1 quarter well, I’m not a genius but I don’t think that is heading anywhere but to be acquired. Maybe Uncle Sam wants to build cars as well as make home loans?

  • stlwest

    Yeah,

    Wouldn’t want to switch production at a plant they already have, gotta open a new plant, can’t run off 10,000 and see how they sell.

    I really think the US is going to be without a major auto manufacturer soon. When you lose close to your market cap in 1 quarter well, I’m not a genius but I don’t think that is heading anywhere but to be acquired. Maybe Uncle Sam wants to build cars as well as make home loans?

  • KY3 Democrat

    Why would you possibly want a car that gets more than 30 MPG? Isn’t it actually easier to send young men and women overseas to fight and die for oil?

    If everyone acted as you do, this war thing would dry up and our economy might focus on (gasp) real jobs. We might have to actually stop sending all our money overseas to Saudi Arabia and China, and start spending it at home. Are you *sure* you want to do this? Sounds risky…

  • KY3 Democrat

    Why would you possibly want a car that gets more than 30 MPG? Isn’t it actually easier to send young men and women overseas to fight and die for oil?

    If everyone acted as you do, this war thing would dry up and our economy might focus on (gasp) real jobs. We might have to actually stop sending all our money overseas to Saudi Arabia and China, and start spending it at home. Are you *sure* you want to do this? Sounds risky…

  • KY3 Democrat

    Why would you possibly want a car that gets more than 30 MPG? Isn’t it actually easier to send young men and women overseas to fight and die for oil?

    If everyone acted as you do, this war thing would dry up and our economy might focus on (gasp) real jobs. We might have to actually stop sending all our money overseas to Saudi Arabia and China, and start spending it at home. Are you *sure* you want to do this? Sounds risky…

  • Instead of loaning several billions of dollars to the auto comapnies, perhaps teh US government can fund building the infrstructure for this type of vehicle. In ohter words build a factory that makes 2 or 3 variants of these clean diesel engines and offer them for sell to all the car makers including the ones who employ americans in the manufacture of cars (BMW, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, and Mazda) as well as “american” manufacturers. Remember that the only thing uniquley american about Ford, GM and Chrysler is where thier headquarters are located.

    The engine could be sold at cost and the car manufacturers worry about transmissons and the rest. It will make these engines easier to maintain and probably less expensive.

  • Instead of loaning several billions of dollars to the auto comapnies, perhaps teh US government can fund building the infrstructure for this type of vehicle. In ohter words build a factory that makes 2 or 3 variants of these clean diesel engines and offer them for sell to all the car makers including the ones who employ americans in the manufacture of cars (BMW, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, and Mazda) as well as “american” manufacturers. Remember that the only thing uniquley american about Ford, GM and Chrysler is where thier headquarters are located.

    The engine could be sold at cost and the car manufacturers worry about transmissons and the rest. It will make these engines easier to maintain and probably less expensive.

  • Instead of loaning several billions of dollars to the auto comapnies, perhaps teh US government can fund building the infrstructure for this type of vehicle. In ohter words build a factory that makes 2 or 3 variants of these clean diesel engines and offer them for sell to all the car makers including the ones who employ americans in the manufacture of cars (BMW, Toyota, Honda, Nissan, and Mazda) as well as “american” manufacturers. Remember that the only thing uniquley american about Ford, GM and Chrysler is where thier headquarters are located.

    The engine could be sold at cost and the car manufacturers worry about transmissons and the rest. It will make these engines easier to maintain and probably less expensive.

  • Roman

    Ford you assholes. Youre already in the hole, take a chance! Set a good price, there is a huge growing market for these!!

  • Roman

    Ford you assholes. Youre already in the hole, take a chance! Set a good price, there is a huge growing market for these!!

  • Ben

    You also have to take in to account that ford has to pay taxes on the sale of cars in the US and not in other countries. They would also have to pay lots of taxes to build a new plant to make these cars. Also the government would rather not loose a ton of tax money from decreased demand. Also the environmental regulations make it much harder to get a diesel like this certified in this country. And most of all most of all Americans don’t really give a shit about MPG. Gas is still cheap. Europe pays more than twice what the US does.

  • Ben

    You also have to take in to account that ford has to pay taxes on the sale of cars in the US and not in other countries. They would also have to pay lots of taxes to build a new plant to make these cars. Also the government would rather not loose a ton of tax money from decreased demand. Also the environmental regulations make it much harder to get a diesel like this certified in this country. And most of all most of all Americans don’t really give a shit about MPG. Gas is still cheap. Europe pays more than twice what the US does.

  • Ben

    You also have to take in to account that ford has to pay taxes on the sale of cars in the US and not in other countries. They would also have to pay lots of taxes to build a new plant to make these cars. Also the government would rather not loose a ton of tax money from decreased demand. Also the environmental regulations make it much harder to get a diesel like this certified in this country. And most of all most of all Americans don’t really give a shit about MPG. Gas is still cheap. Europe pays more than twice what the US does.

  • eddie

    > Is there any truth to the argument that cars like the Fiesta aren’t sold in the US due to small differences between US/California regulations and European Union regulations?

    No. In fact, Mercedes and VW just got their latest diesel models approved by the strict California regulators.

    Ford, please give us a reason to love you!! You have a car that gets 65mpg (63 city, 73 highway) and you find excuses why NOT to sell it in the US. Amazing.

    Ahh yes. Remember the good ol’ days when entrepreneurs found ways to reach their market, instead of finding excuses to NOT reach their market? Yeah, those were the days. 🙂

  • eddie

    > Is there any truth to the argument that cars like the Fiesta aren’t sold in the US due to small differences between US/California regulations and European Union regulations?

    No. In fact, Mercedes and VW just got their latest diesel models approved by the strict California regulators.

    Ford, please give us a reason to love you!! You have a car that gets 65mpg (63 city, 73 highway) and you find excuses why NOT to sell it in the US. Amazing.

    Ahh yes. Remember the good ol’ days when entrepreneurs found ways to reach their market, instead of finding excuses to NOT reach their market? Yeah, those were the days. 🙂

  • > Is there any truth to the argument that cars like the Fiesta aren’t sold in the US due to small differences between US/California regulations and European Union regulations?

    YES! This might not apply directly to the Fiesta, but sales of European diesels in the US have been limited by difference in nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions standards. California has the strictest standards in the world, which have actually been 6 times stricter than Europe.

    For more on this, see:

    http://gas2.org/2008/05/21/clean-diesel-cars-coming-to-us-this-fall-2008-2010-timeline/

  • > Is there any truth to the argument that cars like the Fiesta aren’t sold in the US due to small differences between US/California regulations and European Union regulations?

    YES! This might not apply directly to the Fiesta, but sales of European diesels in the US have been limited by difference in nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions standards. California has the strictest standards in the world, which have actually been 6 times stricter than Europe.

    For more on this, see:

    http://gas2.org/2008/05/21/clean-diesel-cars-coming-to-us-this-fall-2008-2010-timeline/

  • > Is there any truth to the argument that cars like the Fiesta aren’t sold in the US due to small differences between US/California regulations and European Union regulations?

    YES! This might not apply directly to the Fiesta, but sales of European diesels in the US have been limited by difference in nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions standards. California has the strictest standards in the world, which have actually been 6 times stricter than Europe.

    For more on this, see:

    http://gas2.org/2008/05/21/clean-diesel-cars-coming-to-us-this-fall-2008-2010-timeline/

  • Roxie

    Follow countries like Norway – tax cars on the engine size, then raise gas to $5 per gallon here with a higher tax, and the government will still get plenty of money. This would encourage us to rethink our commuting and wastefulness. Norwegians pay about $10 per gallon, our gas tax is low here. The US could use the extra money to install concrete roads, not asphalt, and reduce global warming as well.

  • Roxie

    Follow countries like Norway – tax cars on the engine size, then raise gas to $5 per gallon here with a higher tax, and the government will still get plenty of money. This would encourage us to rethink our commuting and wastefulness. Norwegians pay about $10 per gallon, our gas tax is low here. The US could use the extra money to install concrete roads, not asphalt, and reduce global warming as well.

  • Roxie

    Follow countries like Norway – tax cars on the engine size, then raise gas to $5 per gallon here with a higher tax, and the government will still get plenty of money. This would encourage us to rethink our commuting and wastefulness. Norwegians pay about $10 per gallon, our gas tax is low here. The US could use the extra money to install concrete roads, not asphalt, and reduce global warming as well.

  • Mark Pilbeam

    If you like me want to express your discontent with the CEO of Ford Motor Mr. Allan Mulally, you can email him at amulally@ford.com

    Dear Mr. Mulally:

    I recently found out about Ford’s announcement of the “new” Ford Fiesta Diesel and the fact that Ford is not going to be offering this product in the US.

    http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/07/ford-econetic-fiesta-diesel-63mpg.php

    My comments to you Mr. Mulally is you have got to be kidding that you are not offering this product in the US.

    You are struggling to make Ford Motor Company into a profitable business as it once was.

    You company is getting kicked around by the Japanese automakers.

    The oil companies have killed your profitable SUV and Truck sales here in the US, which is mainly why Ford is in the shape that it’s in. This business is not coming back as long as fuel is near $.4.00 per gallon. Unless you can get the mileage in the high 20’s to 30 mpg we aren’t buying these vehicles again.

    Other than the Focus, which is getting half of the mileage as this new car can you have nothing to offer us Americans that can cut our fuel bills.

    Now you have a chance to offer the American public something that in my mind would be as huge as when Ford introduced the model T and for some unknown reason you don’t want to offer it in the US?

    For a CEO that doesn’t want to take and introduce this to the US. Your company must be looking out for the oil companies if you don’t introduce this product. These are the same people that from what I can see can care less if Ford lives or dies. They haven’t looked out for your company as they been the major reason that we aren’t buying your profitable products any longer. Why protect them by not introducing this product, they are not looking out for you?

    I am going to tell you one thing, we American’s will be very upset with The Ford Motor Company if you don’t introduce this car to the US. You have a chance to be #1 in the US and if you don’t take this opportunity, when I need a new car it will be Japanese and not Ford. I am loyal to the US car makers, but if you are not going to look out for us then my loyalty will stop and I and many other Americans will be changing our views and we won’t care if The Ford Motor Company is in business or not.

    RETHINK YOUR DECISION. It may be the best or worst decision that you make as a CEO of The Ford Motor Company.

    I and many Americans are waiting to see what you plan to do. I can assure you that we will tell all of our friends and family via email of your decision. When we look for a new car we can either look out for your company or decide that our loyalty is gone as your company obviously can care less about us. We need this product in the US, which is a much larger market than Europe is. I urge you to reconsider this decision.

    Thank You,

    Your name

  • Mark Pilbeam

    If you like me want to express your discontent with the CEO of Ford Motor Mr. Allan Mulally, you can email him at amulally@ford.com

    Dear Mr. Mulally:

    I recently found out about Ford’s announcement of the “new” Ford Fiesta Diesel and the fact that Ford is not going to be offering this product in the US.

    http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/07/ford-econetic-fiesta-diesel-63mpg.php

    My comments to you Mr. Mulally is you have got to be kidding that you are not offering this product in the US.

    You are struggling to make Ford Motor Company into a profitable business as it once was.

    You company is getting kicked around by the Japanese automakers.

    The oil companies have killed your profitable SUV and Truck sales here in the US, which is mainly why Ford is in the shape that it’s in. This business is not coming back as long as fuel is near $.4.00 per gallon. Unless you can get the mileage in the high 20’s to 30 mpg we aren’t buying these vehicles again.

    Other than the Focus, which is getting half of the mileage as this new car can you have nothing to offer us Americans that can cut our fuel bills.

    Now you have a chance to offer the American public something that in my mind would be as huge as when Ford introduced the model T and for some unknown reason you don’t want to offer it in the US?

    For a CEO that doesn’t want to take and introduce this to the US. Your company must be looking out for the oil companies if you don’t introduce this product. These are the same people that from what I can see can care less if Ford lives or dies. They haven’t looked out for your company as they been the major reason that we aren’t buying your profitable products any longer. Why protect them by not introducing this product, they are not looking out for you?

    I am going to tell you one thing, we American’s will be very upset with The Ford Motor Company if you don’t introduce this car to the US. You have a chance to be #1 in the US and if you don’t take this opportunity, when I need a new car it will be Japanese and not Ford. I am loyal to the US car makers, but if you are not going to look out for us then my loyalty will stop and I and many other Americans will be changing our views and we won’t care if The Ford Motor Company is in business or not.

    RETHINK YOUR DECISION. It may be the best or worst decision that you make as a CEO of The Ford Motor Company.

    I and many Americans are waiting to see what you plan to do. I can assure you that we will tell all of our friends and family via email of your decision. When we look for a new car we can either look out for your company or decide that our loyalty is gone as your company obviously can care less about us. We need this product in the US, which is a much larger market than Europe is. I urge you to reconsider this decision.

    Thank You,

    Your name

  • Mark Pilbeam

    If you like me want to express your discontent with the CEO of Ford Motor Mr. Allan Mulally, you can email him at amulally@ford.com

    Dear Mr. Mulally:

    I recently found out about Ford’s announcement of the “new” Ford Fiesta Diesel and the fact that Ford is not going to be offering this product in the US.

    http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/07/ford-econetic-fiesta-diesel-63mpg.php

    My comments to you Mr. Mulally is you have got to be kidding that you are not offering this product in the US.

    You are struggling to make Ford Motor Company into a profitable business as it once was.

    You company is getting kicked around by the Japanese automakers.

    The oil companies have killed your profitable SUV and Truck sales here in the US, which is mainly why Ford is in the shape that it’s in. This business is not coming back as long as fuel is near $.4.00 per gallon. Unless you can get the mileage in the high 20’s to 30 mpg we aren’t buying these vehicles again.

    Other than the Focus, which is getting half of the mileage as this new car can you have nothing to offer us Americans that can cut our fuel bills.

    Now you have a chance to offer the American public something that in my mind would be as huge as when Ford introduced the model T and for some unknown reason you don’t want to offer it in the US?

    For a CEO that doesn’t want to take and introduce this to the US. Your company must be looking out for the oil companies if you don’t introduce this product. These are the same people that from what I can see can care less if Ford lives or dies. They haven’t looked out for your company as they been the major reason that we aren’t buying your profitable products any longer. Why protect them by not introducing this product, they are not looking out for you?

    I am going to tell you one thing, we American’s will be very upset with The Ford Motor Company if you don’t introduce this car to the US. You have a chance to be #1 in the US and if you don’t take this opportunity, when I need a new car it will be Japanese and not Ford. I am loyal to the US car makers, but if you are not going to look out for us then my loyalty will stop and I and many other Americans will be changing our views and we won’t care if The Ford Motor Company is in business or not.

    RETHINK YOUR DECISION. It may be the best or worst decision that you make as a CEO of The Ford Motor Company.

    I and many Americans are waiting to see what you plan to do. I can assure you that we will tell all of our friends and family via email of your decision. When we look for a new car we can either look out for your company or decide that our loyalty is gone as your company obviously can care less about us. We need this product in the US, which is a much larger market than Europe is. I urge you to reconsider this decision.

    Thank You,

    Your name

  • i live in erie pa and about 2 miles from were i live is the 3rd? largest bio-diesel plants in the usa.and were do you think they sell there millions of galons of bio-fule in tank cars that litter our water front to europe that were.

    do you think they would put a diesel pump on there property to sell it in town …no.they got to fill hundreds of tank cars and lode it on to ships.that makes money for them in shiping costs and screws us.

  • i live in erie pa and about 2 miles from were i live is the 3rd? largest bio-diesel plants in the usa.and were do you think they sell there millions of galons of bio-fule in tank cars that litter our water front to europe that were.

    do you think they would put a diesel pump on there property to sell it in town …no.they got to fill hundreds of tank cars and lode it on to ships.that makes money for them in shiping costs and screws us.

  • i live in erie pa and about 2 miles from were i live is the 3rd? largest bio-diesel plants in the usa.and were do you think they sell there millions of galons of bio-fule in tank cars that litter our water front to europe that were.

    do you think they would put a diesel pump on there property to sell it in town …no.they got to fill hundreds of tank cars and lode it on to ships.that makes money for them in shiping costs and screws us.

  • web

    Why can’t people just make a car like Speed Racer?

    Look out I think im gonna crash!

    *Car Jumps*

  • web

    Why can’t people just make a car like Speed Racer?

    Look out I think im gonna crash!

    *Car Jumps*

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  • After all of the bullshit in America about our Fords and our Chevy’s–“i’m a chevy kind of guy” “F-you! Ford could kick Chevy’s ass!”–our very own car manufacturers stab us in the back, create something that would solve, or at least hint at solving, some of our problems and then they give it to the Europeans?! Holy shit. When it does come back here, not only am I not going to buy it, I am going to buy a KIA instead just to screw everything up. I personally feel disrespected by Ford. How dare they assume that we are not ready for their invention. Are we not clever enough to pull up to the diesel pump? Or, are we afraid of change? WHAT IS IT? And then to feed us a hazy bullshitty response is even worse. At least address our ailments to our face. I feel disrespected as a consumer. To hell with the Fiesta.

  • After all of the bullshit in America about our Fords and our Chevy’s–“i’m a chevy kind of guy” “F-you! Ford could kick Chevy’s ass!”–our very own car manufacturers stab us in the back, create something that would solve, or at least hint at solving, some of our problems and then they give it to the Europeans?! Holy shit. When it does come back here, not only am I not going to buy it, I am going to buy a KIA instead just to screw everything up. I personally feel disrespected by Ford. How dare they assume that we are not ready for their invention. Are we not clever enough to pull up to the diesel pump? Or, are we afraid of change? WHAT IS IT? And then to feed us a hazy bullshitty response is even worse. At least address our ailments to our face. I feel disrespected as a consumer. To hell with the Fiesta.

  • After all of the bullshit in America about our Fords and our Chevy’s–“i’m a chevy kind of guy” “F-you! Ford could kick Chevy’s ass!”–our very own car manufacturers stab us in the back, create something that would solve, or at least hint at solving, some of our problems and then they give it to the Europeans?! Holy shit. When it does come back here, not only am I not going to buy it, I am going to buy a KIA instead just to screw everything up. I personally feel disrespected by Ford. How dare they assume that we are not ready for their invention. Are we not clever enough to pull up to the diesel pump? Or, are we afraid of change? WHAT IS IT? And then to feed us a hazy bullshitty response is even worse. At least address our ailments to our face. I feel disrespected as a consumer. To hell with the Fiesta.

  • Joel P.

    Wow. And you wonder why the American car makers are getting there asses handed to them daily. I am a Republican small business owner, and I would buy this car in a heartbeat. Silly.

  • Joel P.

    Wow. And you wonder why the American car makers are getting there asses handed to them daily. I am a Republican small business owner, and I would buy this car in a heartbeat. Silly.

  • Joel P.

    Wow. And you wonder why the American car makers are getting there asses handed to them daily. I am a Republican small business owner, and I would buy this car in a heartbeat. Silly.

  • ChuckL

    Well, I have always preferred Fords, but if they won’t sell me a passenger car with a diesel engine, I’ll go elsewhere.

    No more gasoline engines with their inherent pumping losses for me.

    Goodbye Ford, You’re gone.

  • ChuckL

    Well, I have always preferred Fords, but if they won’t sell me a passenger car with a diesel engine, I’ll go elsewhere.

    No more gasoline engines with their inherent pumping losses for me.

    Goodbye Ford, You’re gone.

  • ChuckL

    Well, I have always preferred Fords, but if they won’t sell me a passenger car with a diesel engine, I’ll go elsewhere.

    No more gasoline engines with their inherent pumping losses for me.

    Goodbye Ford, You’re gone.

  • ChuckL

    COST EFFECTIVENESS,

    The cost effectiveness of diesel engines was well documented in a comparison by Diesel Power Magazine. They compared two 2007 Ford F-250s. One a “Power=Stroke” 6.4 liter turbo diesel and the other a “Triton” V-10 gasoline engine. They ran multiple performance tests. In each test the diesel won the performance. It also got better fuel mileage, as little as 20% better in one of the tests, and (sit down) in the best mileage result over 19 mpg for the diesel vs. less than 10 mpg for the gasoline engine.

    The payoff break even point for this comparison on a $7000.00 engine addition and about another $1500.00 for heavy duty equipment specific to the truck diesel, the break even point for the cost difference was computed to be near 7 years.

    The magazine was, I believe, the June 2007 issue. The performance and mileage differentials should remain similar in equally sized passenger cars. The British auto press has several tests of the Jaguar XF2.7-D which uses a Ford built diesel that has been in production since 2004 at Dagenham, England. One of the British testers didn’t know he was driving a diesel until he looked at the engine after his test. He did comment on the low RPM of the engine in a high revving Jag. The straight line performance of the diesel was comparable to the larger, but non-supercharged XF 3.0 gasoline engined car. The reported mileage for this 4780 pound luxury car was 37.9 Imperial MPG. That’s about 31.5 US MPG.

    As far as diesel refineries are concerned, FORGET THEM. Biodiesel is the correct way to go. Biodiesel is less polluting all the way and if we make it from algae it will use no land that is currently used for human or animal food, but even better, algae eats CO2 and releases O2 as it grows.

  • ChuckL

    COST EFFECTIVENESS,

    The cost effectiveness of diesel engines was well documented in a comparison by Diesel Power Magazine. They compared two 2007 Ford F-250s. One a “Power=Stroke” 6.4 liter turbo diesel and the other a “Triton” V-10 gasoline engine. They ran multiple performance tests. In each test the diesel won the performance. It also got better fuel mileage, as little as 20% better in one of the tests, and (sit down) in the best mileage result over 19 mpg for the diesel vs. less than 10 mpg for the gasoline engine.

    The payoff break even point for this comparison on a $7000.00 engine addition and about another $1500.00 for heavy duty equipment specific to the truck diesel, the break even point for the cost difference was computed to be near 7 years.

    The magazine was, I believe, the June 2007 issue. The performance and mileage differentials should remain similar in equally sized passenger cars. The British auto press has several tests of the Jaguar XF2.7-D which uses a Ford built diesel that has been in production since 2004 at Dagenham, England. One of the British testers didn’t know he was driving a diesel until he looked at the engine after his test. He did comment on the low RPM of the engine in a high revving Jag. The straight line performance of the diesel was comparable to the larger, but non-supercharged XF 3.0 gasoline engined car. The reported mileage for this 4780 pound luxury car was 37.9 Imperial MPG. That’s about 31.5 US MPG.

    As far as diesel refineries are concerned, FORGET THEM. Biodiesel is the correct way to go. Biodiesel is less polluting all the way and if we make it from algae it will use no land that is currently used for human or animal food, but even better, algae eats CO2 and releases O2 as it grows.

  • MC MADHAVAN

    In India Ford Diesel gives good mileage for the diesel cars. Ford has got reputation globally and their Products through their R & D gives good products and as EU norms. I do not know why USA wanted to go in for Petrol cars only is still a mystery in the minds of Indians.

  • MC MADHAVAN

    In India Ford Diesel gives good mileage for the diesel cars. Ford has got reputation globally and their Products through their R & D gives good products and as EU norms. I do not know why USA wanted to go in for Petrol cars only is still a mystery in the minds of Indians.

  • MC MADHAVAN

    In India Ford Diesel gives good mileage for the diesel cars. Ford has got reputation globally and their Products through their R & D gives good products and as EU norms. I do not know why USA wanted to go in for Petrol cars only is still a mystery in the minds of Indians.

  • They have always said that. They had a similiar car back in the 80s that got amazing gas mileage and they said no one would buy it. Though I do think no one bought it back then. But I believe it was only a test study they did. More Suvs I think it was called

  • They have always said that. They had a similiar car back in the 80s that got amazing gas mileage and they said no one would buy it. Though I do think no one bought it back then. But I believe it was only a test study they did. More Suvs I think it was called

  • They have always said that. They had a similiar car back in the 80s that got amazing gas mileage and they said no one would buy it. Though I do think no one bought it back then. But I believe it was only a test study they did. More Suvs I think it was called

  • Bill

    Hmmmm, yea, we American’s won’t buy an American car that get’s great mileage. . . . . guess that’s why we have to keep buying VW’s TDI’s. If we have only one choice then we’ll only buy one product.

  • Bill

    Hmmmm, yea, we American’s won’t buy an American car that get’s great mileage. . . . . guess that’s why we have to keep buying VW’s TDI’s. If we have only one choice then we’ll only buy one product.

  • eric needham

    i dont care if the car runs on toilet water …if it gets 65 miles per gallon people will buy it. I have been a ford buyer(4 brand new full sized f150 4x4s since late 90’s) all my life and would continue to be but with their stuborn decision to keep this car out of are market because there execs or shareholders are all in bed with big oil is absolutely insane…as long as ford continues its hard line against such a fuel efficient car that would help tens of thousands of people in our country, i will never buy another.

  • eric needham

    i dont care if the car runs on toilet water …if it gets 65 miles per gallon people will buy it. I have been a ford buyer(4 brand new full sized f150 4x4s since late 90’s) all my life and would continue to be but with their stuborn decision to keep this car out of are market because there execs or shareholders are all in bed with big oil is absolutely insane…as long as ford continues its hard line against such a fuel efficient car that would help tens of thousands of people in our country, i will never buy another.

  • eric needham

    i dont care if the car runs on toilet water …if it gets 65 miles per gallon people will buy it. I have been a ford buyer(4 brand new full sized f150 4x4s since late 90’s) all my life and would continue to be but with their stuborn decision to keep this car out of are market because there execs or shareholders are all in bed with big oil is absolutely insane…as long as ford continues its hard line against such a fuel efficient car that would help tens of thousands of people in our country, i will never buy another.

  • ton-that, chau

    I think that it would be a mistake not to market this car in the U.S. It looks great and has good mileage too.

  • ton-that, chau

    I think that it would be a mistake not to market this car in the U.S. It looks great and has good mileage too.

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  • Ben

    Prakash: “Here in India…Fiesta gives better mileage than 75mpg…..Ford claims a mileage of about 22km/litre…which I guess is about 84mpg….yeah this figures are for disel cars”

    Your numbers are wrong. 22 km/litre is the same as 52 mpg (US gallons) – or 62 mpg if you are using the British definition of a gallon. This is because a British gallon is 20% bigger than a US gallon.

  • Ben

    Prakash: “Here in India…Fiesta gives better mileage than 75mpg…..Ford claims a mileage of about 22km/litre…which I guess is about 84mpg….yeah this figures are for disel cars”

    Your numbers are wrong. 22 km/litre is the same as 52 mpg (US gallons) – or 62 mpg if you are using the British definition of a gallon. This is because a British gallon is 20% bigger than a US gallon.

  • Ben

    Prakash: “Here in India…Fiesta gives better mileage than 75mpg…..Ford claims a mileage of about 22km/litre…which I guess is about 84mpg….yeah this figures are for disel cars”

    Your numbers are wrong. 22 km/litre is the same as 52 mpg (US gallons) – or 62 mpg if you are using the British definition of a gallon. This is because a British gallon is 20% bigger than a US gallon.

  • Lisa

    The guy that said he thinks the government is limiting/prohibiting these cars from coming to the US might be closer to the truth than you are comfortable with. I know LOTS of people who would buy scooters to drive to and from work just for their fuel economy and I also know that the govt limits importing of these fuel sparing transport modes to a mere 2,500 a year! 🙁 I wouldn’t be at all surprised to find out the government is standing in the way of better fuel efficiency. I mean look at what we have now vs 20 years ago. In the 80s I had a honda civic hatchback that ran on good old ordinary gas-no hybrids here and got 50 mpg hwy–most of the hybrids I see out for this year can’t even match that?!?! What’s the point. We should be asking car companies WHY they persist in producing low mileage vehicles when we KNOW they can do better–20 years ago they were! 🙁

  • Lisa

    The guy that said he thinks the government is limiting/prohibiting these cars from coming to the US might be closer to the truth than you are comfortable with. I know LOTS of people who would buy scooters to drive to and from work just for their fuel economy and I also know that the govt limits importing of these fuel sparing transport modes to a mere 2,500 a year! 🙁 I wouldn’t be at all surprised to find out the government is standing in the way of better fuel efficiency. I mean look at what we have now vs 20 years ago. In the 80s I had a honda civic hatchback that ran on good old ordinary gas-no hybrids here and got 50 mpg hwy–most of the hybrids I see out for this year can’t even match that?!?! What’s the point. We should be asking car companies WHY they persist in producing low mileage vehicles when we KNOW they can do better–20 years ago they were! 🙁

  • Lisa

    The guy that said he thinks the government is limiting/prohibiting these cars from coming to the US might be closer to the truth than you are comfortable with. I know LOTS of people who would buy scooters to drive to and from work just for their fuel economy and I also know that the govt limits importing of these fuel sparing transport modes to a mere 2,500 a year! 🙁 I wouldn’t be at all surprised to find out the government is standing in the way of better fuel efficiency. I mean look at what we have now vs 20 years ago. In the 80s I had a honda civic hatchback that ran on good old ordinary gas-no hybrids here and got 50 mpg hwy–most of the hybrids I see out for this year can’t even match that?!?! What’s the point. We should be asking car companies WHY they persist in producing low mileage vehicles when we KNOW they can do better–20 years ago they were! 🙁

  • BradStone

    A few facts not cited by the author:

    1) B cars are low profit and any increase in cost to ‘specialize’ them devastates what little profit they may have made.

    2) The Japanese are building their small cars and diesels in Asia, where they enjoy a very nice exchange rate with the US. Bringing this car from Europe would increase the cost from 30% (Euro) to 50% (Pound). And you see that when you look at the premium you pay for a German car.

    3) IT’S NOT 65MPG. Not in this country. I’m amazed at how many writers miss the basics here. 65MPG is in Imperial Gallons, which are 20% larger than US Gallons. Furthermore, this is all dependent on how the care is driven during the MPG testing, and it’s vastly different in Europe, always yielding a higher MPG due to the nature of their cities / geography requiring a different driving style.

  • BradStone

    A few facts not cited by the author:

    1) B cars are low profit and any increase in cost to ‘specialize’ them devastates what little profit they may have made.

    2) The Japanese are building their small cars and diesels in Asia, where they enjoy a very nice exchange rate with the US. Bringing this car from Europe would increase the cost from 30% (Euro) to 50% (Pound). And you see that when you look at the premium you pay for a German car.

    3) IT’S NOT 65MPG. Not in this country. I’m amazed at how many writers miss the basics here. 65MPG is in Imperial Gallons, which are 20% larger than US Gallons. Furthermore, this is all dependent on how the care is driven during the MPG testing, and it’s vastly different in Europe, always yielding a higher MPG due to the nature of their cities / geography requiring a different driving style.

  • BradStone

    A few facts not cited by the author:

    1) B cars are low profit and any increase in cost to ‘specialize’ them devastates what little profit they may have made.

    2) The Japanese are building their small cars and diesels in Asia, where they enjoy a very nice exchange rate with the US. Bringing this car from Europe would increase the cost from 30% (Euro) to 50% (Pound). And you see that when you look at the premium you pay for a German car.

    3) IT’S NOT 65MPG. Not in this country. I’m amazed at how many writers miss the basics here. 65MPG is in Imperial Gallons, which are 20% larger than US Gallons. Furthermore, this is all dependent on how the care is driven during the MPG testing, and it’s vastly different in Europe, always yielding a higher MPG due to the nature of their cities / geography requiring a different driving style.

  • Saw this car at the ford dealer in my city.

  • Saw this car at the ford dealer in my city.

  • Saw this car at the ford dealer in my city.

  • WTF? Winner of the 24hr Le Mans was a dieselBut not the Indianapolis 500 Call me when you do that

  • WTF? Winner of the 24hr Le Mans was a dieselBut not the Indianapolis 500 Call me when you do that

  • WTF? Winner of the 24hr Le Mans was a dieselBut not the Indianapolis 500 Call me when you do that

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  • THis is lush. I’ll probably get this for my first car now 🙂

  • Diesels are better all around. It’s amazing how late we are expecting this to change. We could have saved a lot of money by now.

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