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Published on August 18th, 2008 | by Nick Chambers

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Suzuki’s Cars Will Run On 100% Ethanol in US, Brazil by 2010

August 18th, 2008 by  
 

Suzuki SX4[social_buttons]

According to the Nikkei Business Daily (via Tradingmarkets.com), Japan’s Suzuki Motor Company will begin selling cars that run completely on 100% ethanol in the US and Brazil by 2010. The company will begin the transition by first offering an E25 sedan for sale in Brazil this coming March.

Currently the most ethanol that a flex-fuel car can run on in the US is E85 — which is an 85% ethanol/15% gasoline blend. Suzuki’s move would mark a huge development in ethanol-powered vehicles, and a huge shift for Suzuki, which hasn’t had any alternative fuel-specific offerings in its lineup to this point.

Ethanol use in the US has risen sharply recently, however, it still accounts for a small amount of the fuel sold. On the other hand, in Brazil ethanol is just as prevalent as gasoline and is available at nearly all fuel stations.

The Brazilian ethanol industry is experiencing amazing growth right now — so much so that the President of UNICA, Marcos Jank, thinks it shows that ethanol does work as a fuel source and doesn’t have to compete with food crops.

The Brazilian ethanol industry is based on the conversion of sugarcane to ethanol and, according to reports, it is a completely self-sustaining industry.

Some key facts of Brazilian ethanol production:

  • All fuel sold in Brazil contains a 20-25% blend of ethanol
  • The unsubsidized ethanol industry offers a fuel that is on average $1 below the price of gas
  • Virtually all 33,000 gas pumps offer E100
  • Just 1% of the 40% of arable land in Brazil is being used to produce sugarcane ethanol
  • 45% of fuel for cars is from sugarcane
  • The food industry is growing faster than the ethanol industry
  • 90% of all new automobiles sold are flex-fuel automobiles
  • 100% of GM vehicles produced in Brazil are flex-fuel
  • 20% of all cars on the road are flex-fuel vehicles today

If those numbers aren’t proof that bio-ethanol can work, I don’t know what is. The US’ problem is that we’re focused on the wrong plant (corn) for ethanol production right now. But that’s changing and hopefully soon the naysayers won’t have any legs to stand on.

I applaud Suzuki for its bold steps in addressing the future needs of the US before there’s even a market to support it.

Posts Related to Ethanol and the Food vs. Fuel Debate:

Image Credits: Suzuki Motor Company


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About the Author

Not your traditional car guy.



  • Jeff Baker

    Corn Ethanol critics routinely omit this fact: Less than half of the corn kernel is used to make ethanol, only the starch. The other half is made into distillers grain, which is fed to animals to produce food. Distillers grain, the byproduct of corn ethanol, improves the energy balance and increases food production. Though it is cheaper, it actually has a higher food value than whole corn as a feed product, because it contains about 10% fat and 90% protein, which are both superior to starch.

    Grass is the natural food for dairy cows and beef cows, not whole corn. For pigs, with a natural diet of starchy root vegetables, rodents and insects, whole corn is not so bad. Poultry would eat whole corn in the wild, but the availability would be limited. They would also eat a variety of local seeds, worms and insects. Feeding whole corn to cows, pigs and poultry is not their natural diet, although it works. It is better to supplement animals with high protein distillers grains than whole corn. When dairy cows are given a 10% supplement of distillers grains, milk production increases by 10 lb per week per cow, and livestock generally put on 10% more meat. This should be a credit to the ethanol industry. Also, it is possible to make distillers grains into high protein foods for direct human consumption. Corn ethanol is food and fuel and always has been.

    Merrill Lynch reports that ethanol blended into regular gasoline lowers the cost by 14 to 24 cents per gallon and reduces our Trade Deficit caused by importing foreign oil. The Trade Deficit we pay interest on, because we pay for imported oil and fuel with debt instruments which are added to the National Debt. Pay no interest on domestic ethanol. The benefits of ethanol and distillers grains offset the impact of higher food prices due to consuming 15% of the corn crop (by weight) in the form of starch.

    The recent roller coaster ride that crude oil went on had a much bigger impact on food prices than corn ethanol. Try shipping a ton of corn from Iowa to a tortia factory in Arizona and see what happens to the price. When oil goes up, ALL food prices go up across the board, including corn. Corn had no impact on rice, and the price of rice doubled.

    Americans are consuming a huge amount of fuel to wage two wars. They also bombed Iraqi infrastructure and cutoff half of Iraqi oil production. This too has driven up the demand and the price of crude oil and the fuels we consume. Speculative investors in oil and commodities futures caused artificial demand, which also drove up the price of fuels and food. OPEC is restricting oil production, and Big Oil is manipulating the supply line of crude oil and refined fuels. The first half of this year, Big Oil also exported 9% of American produced gasoline and diesel fuel, and then imported more expensive foreign fuels, which they sold to you. Your wars, your investors, your cartels, and your 5 oil conglomerates are costing you extra money at the pump and at the grocery store.

    Theres only 7 cents worth of corn in a box of corn flakes. Then why do you pay $3 for it? Because 75% of what you pay for at the supermarket is processing labor and overhead, shipping costs, and marketing labor and overhead. These are all in an inflationary spiral. The complaints against corn ethanol are way overblown.

    The State of Louisiana working with Renergie is building a network of small, localized ethanol plants, based on sweet sorghum, that are expected to get a 5 to 1 return. Every year, a higher percentage of ethanol is coming from other feedstocks: sweet sorghum, organic waste, algae and biomass. This will have a big impact on our domestic fuel supply and also weigh-in on our National Security.

    America is a nation plagued by over consumption. If you are overweight, consider this: You too are contributing to the higher demand for food and impacting the price. Everyone get down to your ideal weight. That will drop food prices faster than whining about corn ethanol.

  • Jeff Baker

    Corn Ethanol critics routinely omit this fact: Less than half of the corn kernel is used to make ethanol, only the starch. The other half is made into distillers grain, which is fed to animals to produce food. Distillers grain, the byproduct of corn ethanol, improves the energy balance and increases food production. Though it is cheaper, it actually has a higher food value than whole corn as a feed product, because it contains about 10% fat and 90% protein, which are both superior to starch.

    Grass is the natural food for dairy cows and beef cows, not whole corn. For pigs, with a natural diet of starchy root vegetables, rodents and insects, whole corn is not so bad. Poultry would eat whole corn in the wild, but the availability would be limited. They would also eat a variety of local seeds, worms and insects. Feeding whole corn to cows, pigs and poultry is not their natural diet, although it works. It is better to supplement animals with high protein distillers grains than whole corn. When dairy cows are given a 10% supplement of distillers grains, milk production increases by 10 lb per week per cow, and livestock generally put on 10% more meat. This should be a credit to the ethanol industry. Also, it is possible to make distillers grains into high protein foods for direct human consumption. Corn ethanol is food and fuel and always has been.

    Merrill Lynch reports that ethanol blended into regular gasoline lowers the cost by 14 to 24 cents per gallon and reduces our Trade Deficit caused by importing foreign oil. The Trade Deficit we pay interest on, because we pay for imported oil and fuel with debt instruments which are added to the National Debt. Pay no interest on domestic ethanol. The benefits of ethanol and distillers grains offset the impact of higher food prices due to consuming 15% of the corn crop (by weight) in the form of starch.

    The recent roller coaster ride that crude oil went on had a much bigger impact on food prices than corn ethanol. Try shipping a ton of corn from Iowa to a tortia factory in Arizona and see what happens to the price. When oil goes up, ALL food prices go up across the board, including corn. Corn had no impact on rice, and the price of rice doubled.

    Americans are consuming a huge amount of fuel to wage two wars. They also bombed Iraqi infrastructure and cutoff half of Iraqi oil production. This too has driven up the demand and the price of crude oil and the fuels we consume. Speculative investors in oil and commodities futures caused artificial demand, which also drove up the price of fuels and food. OPEC is restricting oil production, and Big Oil is manipulating the supply line of crude oil and refined fuels. The first half of this year, Big Oil also exported 9% of American produced gasoline and diesel fuel, and then imported more expensive foreign fuels, which they sold to you. Your wars, your investors, your cartels, and your 5 oil conglomerates are costing you extra money at the pump and at the grocery store.

    Theres only 7 cents worth of corn in a box of corn flakes. Then why do you pay $3 for it? Because 75% of what you pay for at the supermarket is processing labor and overhead, shipping costs, and marketing labor and overhead. These are all in an inflationary spiral. The complaints against corn ethanol are way overblown.

    The State of Louisiana working with Renergie is building a network of small, localized ethanol plants, based on sweet sorghum, that are expected to get a 5 to 1 return. Every year, a higher percentage of ethanol is coming from other feedstocks: sweet sorghum, organic waste, algae and biomass. This will have a big impact on our domestic fuel supply and also weigh-in on our National Security.

    America is a nation plagued by over consumption. If you are overweight, consider this: You too are contributing to the higher demand for food and impacting the price. Everyone get down to your ideal weight. That will drop food prices faster than whining about corn ethanol.

  • Very good point Jeff. The part of the corn, the starch that is used to make ethanol has no nutritional value. This is also the part of the corn that puts “fat” on beef cattle. I think we can all agree that “lean” beef is heathier for the consumer and contains more protien.

    The point being you might pay more for a pound of beef, but you are buying less fat.

    Another point not mentioned in any of the energy conversion tables is the amount of energy used to extract crude oil, ship it half way around the world, and refine it.

    It would seem to me, that this is viable as every aspect of making ethanol seems to be included. from planting, fertilizing, harvesting, and distilling.

    I mean come on America! Facts are facts, ethanol from corn makes food healthier. If farmers have found a way to remove the starch from their feedstocks it won’t end up as a spare tire around your belly.

    Although there is no way that corn etanol is going to replace gasoline, we may as well use the starch/complex carbohydrate sugar to fuel our cars. The alternative is if we don’t, We end up going to the Gym to consume electricity to walk it off.

    In conjunction with algae from ponds, corn/ethanol can reduce our dependance on oil. You don’t even have to buy a new car to get this going. A $200 computer chip will convert your existing car.

  • Very good point Jeff. The part of the corn, the starch that is used to make ethanol has no nutritional value. This is also the part of the corn that puts “fat” on beef cattle. I think we can all agree that “lean” beef is heathier for the consumer and contains more protien.

    The point being you might pay more for a pound of beef, but you are buying less fat.

    Another point not mentioned in any of the energy conversion tables is the amount of energy used to extract crude oil, ship it half way around the world, and refine it.

    It would seem to me, that this is viable as every aspect of making ethanol seems to be included. from planting, fertilizing, harvesting, and distilling.

    I mean come on America! Facts are facts, ethanol from corn makes food healthier. If farmers have found a way to remove the starch from their feedstocks it won’t end up as a spare tire around your belly.

    Although there is no way that corn etanol is going to replace gasoline, we may as well use the starch/complex carbohydrate sugar to fuel our cars. The alternative is if we don’t, We end up going to the Gym to consume electricity to walk it off.

    In conjunction with algae from ponds, corn/ethanol can reduce our dependance on oil. You don’t even have to buy a new car to get this going. A $200 computer chip will convert your existing car.

  • Greg

    The only problem with cars run on ethanol is that the energy conversion rate is shitty and MPG’s falls drastically.

  • Greg

    The only problem with cars run on ethanol is that the energy conversion rate is shitty and MPG’s falls drastically.

  • It make no sense to make cars to run ethanol. It takes extra energy to make ethanol and it will take 28% more fuel using e85. So a 30MPG car would get 21.6 using just e85 Ethanol. 85%.

    Look at the site

    http://www.agriculture.com/ag/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/ag/story/data/1147098565893.xml

    Battery is the way to go in the future.

  • It make no sense to make cars to run ethanol. It takes extra energy to make ethanol and it will take 28% more fuel using e85. So a 30MPG car would get 21.6 using just e85 Ethanol. 85%.

    Look at the site

    http://www.agriculture.com/ag/story.jhtml?storyid=/templatedata/ag/story/data/1147098565893.xml

    Battery is the way to go in the future.

  • Robert Palmer

    Dude, didnt the US already try the ethanol thing one time and it flopped?

    Rd

    http://www.FireMe.to/udi

  • Robert Palmer

    Dude, didnt the US already try the ethanol thing one time and it flopped?

    Rd

    http://www.FireMe.to/udi

  • Pingback: Chat Marchet News Digest » Suzuki to Begin Selling Cars Fueled by 100% Ethanol by 2010()

  • I tell you this. A battery car with a motorcycle engine to charge the battery when the battery reaches a point is the most eff. The car should be designed to charge down hill or coasting on inertia physics. Some motorcycles get over a 100 MPG and without weight would get well over a 100 MPG.

  • I tell you this. A battery car with a motorcycle engine to charge the battery when the battery reaches a point is the most eff. The car should be designed to charge down hill or coasting on inertia physics. Some motorcycles get over a 100 MPG and without weight would get well over a 100 MPG.

  • Pingback: Matt Castille » Blog Archive » Suzuki’s Cars Will Run On 100% Ethanol in US, Brazil by 2010 : Gas 2.0()

  • lincmercguy

    Flex-fuel cars can run on 100% ethanol, there is a different reason E-85 contains gasoline. The gasoline is added to de-nature the alcohol. If this was not done, the ethanol fuel would be drinkable and beverage taxes would have to be paid. Beyond that, if it were taxed as a beverage, it would have to meet the specification of whiskey or burbon, so it would have to be aged in oak barrels for 4 or 8 years. Basically, it’s white lightning before the gasoline is added.

  • i was thinking. What if we put magnets under the wheel wells of all 4 tires and use the rims of tires to create a magneto like in a lawn mower to produce electricity to charge a battery car too? Just using old technology a new way.

    http://science.howstuffworks.com/question375.htm

  • lincmercguy

    Flex-fuel cars can run on 100% ethanol, there is a different reason E-85 contains gasoline. The gasoline is added to de-nature the alcohol. If this was not done, the ethanol fuel would be drinkable and beverage taxes would have to be paid. Beyond that, if it were taxed as a beverage, it would have to meet the specification of whiskey or burbon, so it would have to be aged in oak barrels for 4 or 8 years. Basically, it’s white lightning before the gasoline is added.

  • i was thinking. What if we put magnets under the wheel wells of all 4 tires and use the rims of tires to create a magneto like in a lawn mower to produce electricity to charge a battery car too? Just using old technology a new way.

    http://science.howstuffworks.com/question375.htm

  • I can totally see Suzuki sales soaring in the US after the release of their new line of cars. I’m sure they’ll be priced very reasonable as well.

  • I can totally see Suzuki sales soaring in the US after the release of their new line of cars. I’m sure they’ll be priced very reasonable as well.

  • I can totally see Suzuki sales soaring in the US after the release of their new line of cars. I’m sure they’ll be priced very reasonable as well.

  • The price of gas is not the more gas or fuel the less the price, but on a genie in a bottle -speculation…

    ie

    I think we will have bad weather in the Atlantic…Increase the price.

    ie

    There may be a conflict somewhere overseas…Increase the price.

    What would the gov do, if we paid less on our mortgages cuz the price of our home went down in value? They would foreclose on us and not care.

  • The price of gas is not the more gas or fuel the less the price, but on a genie in a bottle -speculation…

    ie

    I think we will have bad weather in the Atlantic…Increase the price.

    ie

    There may be a conflict somewhere overseas…Increase the price.

    What would the gov do, if we paid less on our mortgages cuz the price of our home went down in value? They would foreclose on us and not care.

  • implement the most efficient manner of renewable ethanol production and you’ve got a deal…

    algae, bacteria, et al. NOT: what would otherwise be feed for humans and livestock, subsidized heavily to inhibit competition and growth.

    brazil can more efficiently produce ethanol from cane sugar, something it has plenty of. good for them; i hope their demand and good example will wean us all.

  • Felipe Zurkka Tadeu

    Hi there, I’m a Brazilian and i have a flex fuel car, a VW Polo 1.6

    Some of the facts, flex fuel cars use a start up engine,those uses gasoline but like 0.5 liters in a week or two, this is only used in cold conditions, like 10 Celsius or lower, but some engines already don’t need this, like the 1.4 econoflex from GM

    Here in brazil we dont need to sacrifice other crops to plant sugarcane, like the article said, other crops are rising faster then the sugarcane

    Corn looks like a sure bet for ethanol, 1 ton of corn produces more ethanol then 1 ton of sugarcane, but here is the catch, the sugarcane produces much more tons per acre, i don’t know the how much, but this makes the sugarcane much more profitable then the corn

    everyone says that ethanol only have 70% of the efficiency of gas, that’s true, but ethanol has more octanes than gas, it makes your car work batter, and faster as well, my vw has 101 hp on gas and this go to 104 in ethanol, but on ethanol there is less carburation, the engines is cleaner, so less maintenance costs

    ethanol releases very little co2 in the air, i think its like something almost 10 times lower then gas

    ok hope just my 2 cents, my english is a little rusty, so i might made some mistakes, if anyone wants to ask me any info or pictures of my car i can gladly send them my email is zurkka at gmail dot com

  • Felipe Zurkka Tadeu

    Hi there, I’m a Brazilian and i have a flex fuel car, a VW Polo 1.6

    Some of the facts, flex fuel cars use a start up engine,those uses gasoline but like 0.5 liters in a week or two, this is only used in cold conditions, like 10 Celsius or lower, but some engines already don’t need this, like the 1.4 econoflex from GM

    Here in brazil we dont need to sacrifice other crops to plant sugarcane, like the article said, other crops are rising faster then the sugarcane

    Corn looks like a sure bet for ethanol, 1 ton of corn produces more ethanol then 1 ton of sugarcane, but here is the catch, the sugarcane produces much more tons per acre, i don’t know the how much, but this makes the sugarcane much more profitable then the corn

    everyone says that ethanol only have 70% of the efficiency of gas, that’s true, but ethanol has more octanes than gas, it makes your car work batter, and faster as well, my vw has 101 hp on gas and this go to 104 in ethanol, but on ethanol there is less carburation, the engines is cleaner, so less maintenance costs

    ethanol releases very little co2 in the air, i think its like something almost 10 times lower then gas

    ok hope just my 2 cents, my english is a little rusty, so i might made some mistakes, if anyone wants to ask me any info or pictures of my car i can gladly send them my email is zurkka at gmail dot com

  • Some think ethanol is the key to energy dependence? Energy dependence is an illusion. As long as lobbyist are in DC paying off politicians there will not be energy dependence. Just a different game the politicians will play.

    Do you want to bet all your life saving on an illusion? The most eff method of dependence is walking or taking a bus.

  • Some think ethanol is the key to energy dependence? Energy dependence is an illusion. As long as lobbyist are in DC paying off politicians there will not be energy dependence. Just a different game the politicians will play.

    Do you want to bet all your life saving on an illusion? The most eff method of dependence is walking or taking a bus.

  • Joe

    Why would anyone want to run a car on ethanol? It costs more per mile than gas.

    http://www.fuelgaugereport.com/

  • Joe

    Why would anyone want to run a car on ethanol? It costs more per mile than gas.

    http://www.fuelgaugereport.com/

  • Joe

    Why would anyone want to run a car on ethanol? It costs more per mile than gas.

    http://www.fuelgaugereport.com/

  • Dude,Yes E85 did flop once acording to the article that was back in the day when gas was $2.20 a gallon and E85 came to $2.85.

    The last time I filled up I paid $2.70 for E85. Unleaded regular was selling for $3.89.

    My Ford Ranger gets 26 MPG w/regular unleaded and 21 MPG w/E85. this works out to a reduction of 20% in mileage against a savings of 30% in fuel.

    E85 as an alternative fuel is now feasable, because its price is coming down and gas is going up. It also is cleaner burning than gas.

    You can buy a conversion kit and start using E85 today. Batteries are the next logical step but I can’t go out and buy one until 2010, and the $20,000 to convert my ranger to electric seems ridiculous.

    At least I know my money is going to an American farmer when I buy fuel instead of to some foriegn dictator that wants to build a nuclear bomb.

    I hear electric cars flopped once too. If we dont improve the range and price of the batteries they will just remain a dream for tommorow. Until then I’m fillin up with good old USA white lightning!

  • Dude,Yes E85 did flop once acording to the article that was back in the day when gas was $2.20 a gallon and E85 came to $2.85.

    The last time I filled up I paid $2.70 for E85. Unleaded regular was selling for $3.89.

    My Ford Ranger gets 26 MPG w/regular unleaded and 21 MPG w/E85. this works out to a reduction of 20% in mileage against a savings of 30% in fuel.

    E85 as an alternative fuel is now feasable, because its price is coming down and gas is going up. It also is cleaner burning than gas.

    You can buy a conversion kit and start using E85 today. Batteries are the next logical step but I can’t go out and buy one until 2010, and the $20,000 to convert my ranger to electric seems ridiculous.

    At least I know my money is going to an American farmer when I buy fuel instead of to some foriegn dictator that wants to build a nuclear bomb.

    I hear electric cars flopped once too. If we dont improve the range and price of the batteries they will just remain a dream for tommorow. Until then I’m fillin up with good old USA white lightning!

  • I think cellulosic ethanol would be a better choice then corn because if you use total biomass then the leaves and stalks of the plant that contain everything else then you will produce more ethanol.

  • I think cellulosic ethanol would be a better choice then corn because if you use total biomass then the leaves and stalks of the plant that contain everything else then you will produce more ethanol.

  • I think cellulosic ethanol would be a better choice then corn because if you use total biomass then the leaves and stalks of the plant that contain everything else then you will produce more ethanol.

  • Jeff Baker

    The main problem with ethanol is that the majority of engines on the road today are not designed for it. The Saab 9-5 Biopower engine is optimized for ethanol. It outperforms gasoline, getting 20% more power, 16% greater torque, and 10% better mileage. Now Suzuki and other car makers will follow. Ethanol can be denatured without using gasoline. Our system of blending 15% gasoline into ethanol is not necessary. That was how politicians created an incentive for oil companies to distribute ethanol, by giving them a 51 cent per gallon tax credit to blend it with gasoline. Problem is, ethanol performs better when its mixed with water rather than gasoline. This is called hydrous ethanol. A Pratt Community College engine testing team lead by instructor Greg Bacon, mixed 20% water with pure ethanol, and efficiency in the combustion chamber doubled. When the ethanol explodes, the water instantly turns to steam and provides hydrogen and oxygen inside the cylinder. Next year, Ford is introducing the EcoBoost engine, which may also have advanced ethanol technology that doubles efficiency. Brazil has been using 4% hydrous ethanol for years. They laughed at us when we started mixing ethanol with gasoline. Water is the way. Louisiana is implementing an experimental hydrous ethanol program. Dongfeng, a major Chinese auto maker is introducing a car this year, with a slightly modified fuel system, that runs on 65% ethanol and 35% water. They claim hydrogen is formed. Toyota also has a similar hydrous ethanol prototype that produces on board hydrogen. Major automakers are coming out with smaller, lighter, high compression and turbocharged ethanol optimized engines that are more efficient than current gasoline engines. Maybe that’s why Toyota is building ethanol plants in Brazil, and GM is investing in ethanol development in the U. S…They must know something we don’t know about ethanol.

  • Jeff Baker

    The main problem with ethanol is that the majority of engines on the road today are not designed for it. The Saab 9-5 Biopower engine is optimized for ethanol. It outperforms gasoline, getting 20% more power, 16% greater torque, and 10% better mileage. Now Suzuki and other car makers will follow. Ethanol can be denatured without using gasoline. Our system of blending 15% gasoline into ethanol is not necessary. That was how politicians created an incentive for oil companies to distribute ethanol, by giving them a 51 cent per gallon tax credit to blend it with gasoline. Problem is, ethanol performs better when its mixed with water rather than gasoline. This is called hydrous ethanol. A Pratt Community College engine testing team lead by instructor Greg Bacon, mixed 20% water with pure ethanol, and efficiency in the combustion chamber doubled. When the ethanol explodes, the water instantly turns to steam and provides hydrogen and oxygen inside the cylinder. Next year, Ford is introducing the EcoBoost engine, which may also have advanced ethanol technology that doubles efficiency. Brazil has been using 4% hydrous ethanol for years. They laughed at us when we started mixing ethanol with gasoline. Water is the way. Louisiana is implementing an experimental hydrous ethanol program. Dongfeng, a major Chinese auto maker is introducing a car this year, with a slightly modified fuel system, that runs on 65% ethanol and 35% water. They claim hydrogen is formed. Toyota also has a similar hydrous ethanol prototype that produces on board hydrogen. Major automakers are coming out with smaller, lighter, high compression and turbocharged ethanol optimized engines that are more efficient than current gasoline engines. Maybe that’s why Toyota is building ethanol plants in Brazil, and GM is investing in ethanol development in the U. S…They must know something we don’t know about ethanol.

  • Nearly all the taxis in Bangkok use LPG or NGV, I dont see why slowly introducing new types of fuel shouldn’t work everywhere.

  • Nearly all the taxis in Bangkok use LPG or NGV, I dont see why slowly introducing new types of fuel shouldn’t work everywhere.

  • Almir R. Américo

    I will take this opportunity to add some useful words about Brazilian bio-fuels.

    As rising food prices continue to threaten food security around the world, Brazilian ethanol is one obvious solution being largely ignored. Brazil set up its efficient fuel alternative program in the 70s, when the first oil crisis hit the world. Now Brazilians drive cars moved by ethanol or gasoline mixed in any proportion. And since long ago gasoline in Brazil is not pure, but blended with 25% ethanol, resulting that internal consumption of ethanol in the country is already superior to gasoline’s. Ethanol in Brazil is already much cheaper than gasoline at current international oil prices.

    Brazilian ethanol is produced from sugarcane without any governmental subsidies and the fuel has a very competitive price. Researchers are increasing the productivity (more fuel extracted per sq.km. of crops) by adapting sugar canes species to each type of land and topography. The productivity now is more than 3 times the records of 30 years ago and it keeps on raising, being expected to soar very soon when the technology to extract ethanol from cellulosic materials (crop waste) will be available for large scale production.

    Ethanol production in Brazil uses just one percent of total arable land, and the country can expand its sugarcane fields without disturbing sensitive land areas (like Amazon), just by tapping land such as depleted pastures. Just raising intensity of cattle production from the current 0.8 animals per hectare to 1.2 animals (a target already far exceeded in many parts of the country) would release about 80m hectares of land for crops. There remains plenty of room for expansion: the country has 355 million hectares of farmable land, of which 7 million hectares under sugarcane of which the amount used to make ethanol fills 3.4 million hectares (compared to 200m hectares of pasture). Another 105.8 million hectares remained available, which allows Brazil to increase ethanol production without affecting the environment or food. By comparison, the additional terrain for Brazilian crops could surpass all of the land now under cultivation in the European Union.

    Meanwhile, Brazilian food production has doubled in the past decade and that’s the most impressive thing about ethanol from sugarcane: in contrast to corn-based American ethanol or biodiesel derived from soybean oil, there is no cost pressure and no competition with food.

    Another persuasive fact for incentiving ethanol production in Brazil is the electric energy that is generated as a by-product of ethanol processing: taking into consideration the energetic balance, the electricity generated in sugar cane processing in Brazil is almost as large as its ethanol equivalence. It’s like a two large scale hydroelectric plants generating electricity exactly when it’s more necessary: in the Brazilian dry season! So the producers of ethanol are also having increasing revenues by selling electricity to the country’s national electric system, which has become an strategic and reliable source of electricity. For all these reasons, ethanol in Brazil is a win-win game for the country, the farmers, the consumers and the environment.

    Off course Brazilian ethanol does not intend to concur with petroleum, but it could ease up current oil crisis by supplying a small part of the world energy demand. It is only necessary to look at the increasing demand from the non-oil countries like India and China to understand that the very high price of oil is here to stay. With the existing price of oil, the permanent threat of war in the Middle East, the international geopolitics, and the environmental problems, there seems to be no other easy solution for the energy problem away from the liquid ethanol produced out of sugarcane. This is certainly a very important aspect of the Brazilian economy for the next few years and the rest of the world will have to accept the reality of the liquid ethanol from sugarcane as the right and best solution for the oil crisis.

    The problem is that much of Brazil’s ethanol exports continues to face prohibitive tariffs and other barriers to developed markets in the US and Europe. The United States currently places a 54-cent-a-gallon tariff on ethanol imported from Brazil. Consumers in the country are being severely affected, particularly in areas such as the Southeast, where corn does not exist and the logistics to bring ethanol from the center of the country is practically impossible. It is difficult to understand the maintenance these tariff levels, except for political reasons. The developed world appears purposely myopic in relation to the opportunities Brazil presents, maybe it’s because that would upset wealthy US and European farmers – a price apparently not worth paying.

    Almir R. Américo – Sao Paulo, Brazil (almiramerico@gmail.com)

  • Almir R. Américo

    I will take this opportunity to add some useful words about Brazilian bio-fuels.

    As rising food prices continue to threaten food security around the world, Brazilian ethanol is one obvious solution being largely ignored. Brazil set up its efficient fuel alternative program in the 70s, when the first oil crisis hit the world. Now Brazilians drive cars moved by ethanol or gasoline mixed in any proportion. And since long ago gasoline in Brazil is not pure, but blended with 25% ethanol, resulting that internal consumption of ethanol in the country is already superior to gasoline’s. Ethanol in Brazil is already much cheaper than gasoline at current international oil prices.

    Brazilian ethanol is produced from sugarcane without any governmental subsidies and the fuel has a very competitive price. Researchers are increasing the productivity (more fuel extracted per sq.km. of crops) by adapting sugar canes species to each type of land and topography. The productivity now is more than 3 times the records of 30 years ago and it keeps on raising, being expected to soar very soon when the technology to extract ethanol from cellulosic materials (crop waste) will be available for large scale production.

    Ethanol production in Brazil uses just one percent of total arable land, and the country can expand its sugarcane fields without disturbing sensitive land areas (like Amazon), just by tapping land such as depleted pastures. Just raising intensity of cattle production from the current 0.8 animals per hectare to 1.2 animals (a target already far exceeded in many parts of the country) would release about 80m hectares of land for crops. There remains plenty of room for expansion: the country has 355 million hectares of farmable land, of which 7 million hectares under sugarcane of which the amount used to make ethanol fills 3.4 million hectares (compared to 200m hectares of pasture). Another 105.8 million hectares remained available, which allows Brazil to increase ethanol production without affecting the environment or food. By comparison, the additional terrain for Brazilian crops could surpass all of the land now under cultivation in the European Union.

    Meanwhile, Brazilian food production has doubled in the past decade and that’s the most impressive thing about ethanol from sugarcane: in contrast to corn-based American ethanol or biodiesel derived from soybean oil, there is no cost pressure and no competition with food.

    Another persuasive fact for incentiving ethanol production in Brazil is the electric energy that is generated as a by-product of ethanol processing: taking into consideration the energetic balance, the electricity generated in sugar cane processing in Brazil is almost as large as its ethanol equivalence. It’s like a two large scale hydroelectric plants generating electricity exactly when it’s more necessary: in the Brazilian dry season! So the producers of ethanol are also having increasing revenues by selling electricity to the country’s national electric system, which has become an strategic and reliable source of electricity. For all these reasons, ethanol in Brazil is a win-win game for the country, the farmers, the consumers and the environment.

    Off course Brazilian ethanol does not intend to concur with petroleum, but it could ease up current oil crisis by supplying a small part of the world energy demand. It is only necessary to look at the increasing demand from the non-oil countries like India and China to understand that the very high price of oil is here to stay. With the existing price of oil, the permanent threat of war in the Middle East, the international geopolitics, and the environmental problems, there seems to be no other easy solution for the energy problem away from the liquid ethanol produced out of sugarcane. This is certainly a very important aspect of the Brazilian economy for the next few years and the rest of the world will have to accept the reality of the liquid ethanol from sugarcane as the right and best solution for the oil crisis.

    The problem is that much of Brazil’s ethanol exports continues to face prohibitive tariffs and other barriers to developed markets in the US and Europe. The United States currently places a 54-cent-a-gallon tariff on ethanol imported from Brazil. Consumers in the country are being severely affected, particularly in areas such as the Southeast, where corn does not exist and the logistics to bring ethanol from the center of the country is practically impossible. It is difficult to understand the maintenance these tariff levels, except for political reasons. The developed world appears purposely myopic in relation to the opportunities Brazil presents, maybe it’s because that would upset wealthy US and European farmers – a price apparently not worth paying.

    Almir R. Américo – Sao Paulo, Brazil (almiramerico@gmail.com)

  • Kennedy

    Exactly, Jeff. The notion that corn ethanol is responsible for the high prices we’re seeing at grocery stores is misguided at best. It’s the high price of oil (needed in almost every step between planting a crop and getting the end product on the shelf) that is driving up costs. If anything, ethanol is keeping the cost of gas from being any higher.

  • Kennedy

    Exactly, Jeff. The notion that corn ethanol is responsible for the high prices we’re seeing at grocery stores is misguided at best. It’s the high price of oil (needed in almost every step between planting a crop and getting the end product on the shelf) that is driving up costs. If anything, ethanol is keeping the cost of gas from being any higher.

  • Kennedy

    Exactly, Jeff. The notion that corn ethanol is responsible for the high prices we’re seeing at grocery stores is misguided at best. It’s the high price of oil (needed in almost every step between planting a crop and getting the end product on the shelf) that is driving up costs. If anything, ethanol is keeping the cost of gas from being any higher.

  • I’ll have to agree with Greg and Bill.

    Running on ethanol may not be the most efficient we can come up with because the MPG is low and the energy conversion rate is quite low.

  • I’ll have to agree with Greg and Bill.

    Running on ethanol may not be the most efficient we can come up with because the MPG is low and the energy conversion rate is quite low.

  • Brian J. Donovan

    Baton Rouge, LA (September 8, 2008) – Governor Bobby Jindal has signed into law the Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative, the most comprehensive and far-reaching state legislation in the nation enacted to develop a statewide advanced biofuel industry. Louisiana is the first state to enact alternative transportation fuel legislation that includes a variable blending pump pilot program and a hydrous ethanol pilot program.

    Field-to-Pump Strategy

    The legislature found that the proper development of an advanced biofuel industry in Louisiana requires implementation of the following comprehensive “field-to-pump” strategy developed by Renergie, Inc.:

    (1) Feedstock Other Than Corn

    (a) derived solely from Louisiana harvested crops;

    (b) capable of an annual yield of at least 600 gallons of ethanol per acre;

    (c) requiring no more than one-half of the water required to grow corn;

    (d) tolerant to high temperature and waterlogging;

    (e) resistant to drought and saline-alkaline soils;

    (f) capable of being grown in marginal soils, ranging from heavy clay to light sand;

    (g) requiring no more than one-third of the nitrogen required to grow corn, thereby reducing the risk of

    contamination of the waters of the state; and

    (h) requiring no more than one-half of the energy necessary to convert corn into ethanol.

    (2) Decentralized Network of Small Advanced Biofuel Manufacturing Facilities

    Smaller is better. The distributed nature of a small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility network reduces feedstock supply risk, does not burden local water supplies and provides for broader based economic development. Each advanced biofuel manufacturing facility operating in Louisiana will produce no less than 5 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year and no more than 15 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year.

    (3) Market Expansion

    Advanced biofuel supply and demand shall be expanded beyond the 10% blend market by blending fuel-grade anhydrous ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump. Variable blending pumps, directly installed and operated at local gas stations by a qualified small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility, shall offer the consumer a less expensive substitute for unleaded gasoline in the form of E10, E20, E30 and E85.

    Pilot Programs

    (1) Advanced Biofuel Variable Blending Pumps – The blending of fuels with advanced biofuel percentages between 10 percent and 85 percent will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the equipment used to dispense the ethanol blends to ascertain that the equipment is suitable and capable of producing an accurate measurement.

    (2) Hydrous Ethanol – The use of hydrous ethanol blends of E10, E20, E30 and E85 in motor vehicles specifically selected for test purposes will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the performance of the motor vehicles. The hydrous blends will be tested for blend optimization with respect to fuel consumption and engine emissions. Preliminary tests conducted in Europe have proven that the use of hydrous ethanol, which eliminates the need for the hydrous-to-anhydrous dehydration processing step, results in an energy savings of between ten percent and forty-five percent during processing, a four percent product volume increase, higher mileage per gallon, a cleaner engine interior, and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

    Act No. 382, entitled “The Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative,” was co-authored by 27 members of the Legislature. The original bill was drafted by Renergie, Inc. Representative Jonathan W. Perry (R – District 47), with the support of Senator Nick Gautreaux (D – District 26), was the primary author of the bill. Reflecting on the signing of Act No. 382 into law, Brian J. Donovan, CEO of Renergie, Inc. said, “I am pleased that the legislature and governor of the great State of Louisiana have chosen to lead the nation in moving ethanol beyond being just a blending component in gasoline to a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. The two pilot programs, providing for an advanced biofuel variable blending pump trial and a hydrous ethanol trial, established by the State of Louisiana should be adopted by each and every state in our country.”

    State Agencies Must Purchase or Lease Vehicles That Use Alternative Fuels

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative further states, “The commissioner of administration shall not purchase or lease any motor vehicle for use by any state agency unless that vehicle is capable of and equipped for using an alternative fuel that results in lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, or particulates or any combination thereof that meet or exceed federal Clean Air Act standards.”

    Advanced Biofuel Price Preference for State Agencies

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative provides that a governmental body, state educational institution, or instrumentality of the state that performs essential governmental functions on a statewide or local basis is entitled to purchase E20, E30 or E85 advanced biofuel at a price equal to fifteen percent (15%) less per gallon than the price of unleaded gasoline for use in any motor vehicle.

    Economic Benefits

    The development of an advanced biofuel industry will help rebuild the local and regional economies devastated as a result of hurricanes Katrina and Rita by providing:

    (1) increased value to the feedstock crops which will benefit local farmers and provide more revenue to the local community;

    (2) increased investments in plants and equipment which will stimulate the local economy by providing construction jobs initially and the chance for full-time employment after the plant is completed;

    (3) secondary employment as associated industries develop due to plant co-products becoming available at a competitive price; and

    (4) increased local and state revenues collected from plant operations will stimulate local and state tax revenues and provide funds for improvements to the community and to the region.

    “Representative Perry and Senator Gautreaux have worked tirelessly to craft comprehensive advanced biofuel legislation which will maximize rural development, benefit consumers, farmers and gas station owners while also protecting the environment and reducing the burden on local water supplies,” said Donovan. “Representative Perry, Senator Gautreaux, and Dr. Strain, Commissioner of the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, should be praised for their leadership on this issue.”

    About Renergie

    Renergie was formed on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol. Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program. Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

  • Brian J. Donovan

    Baton Rouge, LA (September 8, 2008) – Governor Bobby Jindal has signed into law the Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative, the most comprehensive and far-reaching state legislation in the nation enacted to develop a statewide advanced biofuel industry. Louisiana is the first state to enact alternative transportation fuel legislation that includes a variable blending pump pilot program and a hydrous ethanol pilot program.

    Field-to-Pump Strategy

    The legislature found that the proper development of an advanced biofuel industry in Louisiana requires implementation of the following comprehensive “field-to-pump” strategy developed by Renergie, Inc.:

    (1) Feedstock Other Than Corn

    (a) derived solely from Louisiana harvested crops;

    (b) capable of an annual yield of at least 600 gallons of ethanol per acre;

    (c) requiring no more than one-half of the water required to grow corn;

    (d) tolerant to high temperature and waterlogging;

    (e) resistant to drought and saline-alkaline soils;

    (f) capable of being grown in marginal soils, ranging from heavy clay to light sand;

    (g) requiring no more than one-third of the nitrogen required to grow corn, thereby reducing the risk of

    contamination of the waters of the state; and

    (h) requiring no more than one-half of the energy necessary to convert corn into ethanol.

    (2) Decentralized Network of Small Advanced Biofuel Manufacturing Facilities

    Smaller is better. The distributed nature of a small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility network reduces feedstock supply risk, does not burden local water supplies and provides for broader based economic development. Each advanced biofuel manufacturing facility operating in Louisiana will produce no less than 5 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year and no more than 15 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year.

    (3) Market Expansion

    Advanced biofuel supply and demand shall be expanded beyond the 10% blend market by blending fuel-grade anhydrous ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump. Variable blending pumps, directly installed and operated at local gas stations by a qualified small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility, shall offer the consumer a less expensive substitute for unleaded gasoline in the form of E10, E20, E30 and E85.

    Pilot Programs

    (1) Advanced Biofuel Variable Blending Pumps – The blending of fuels with advanced biofuel percentages between 10 percent and 85 percent will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the equipment used to dispense the ethanol blends to ascertain that the equipment is suitable and capable of producing an accurate measurement.

    (2) Hydrous Ethanol – The use of hydrous ethanol blends of E10, E20, E30 and E85 in motor vehicles specifically selected for test purposes will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the performance of the motor vehicles. The hydrous blends will be tested for blend optimization with respect to fuel consumption and engine emissions. Preliminary tests conducted in Europe have proven that the use of hydrous ethanol, which eliminates the need for the hydrous-to-anhydrous dehydration processing step, results in an energy savings of between ten percent and forty-five percent during processing, a four percent product volume increase, higher mileage per gallon, a cleaner engine interior, and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

    Act No. 382, entitled “The Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative,” was co-authored by 27 members of the Legislature. The original bill was drafted by Renergie, Inc. Representative Jonathan W. Perry (R – District 47), with the support of Senator Nick Gautreaux (D – District 26), was the primary author of the bill. Reflecting on the signing of Act No. 382 into law, Brian J. Donovan, CEO of Renergie, Inc. said, “I am pleased that the legislature and governor of the great State of Louisiana have chosen to lead the nation in moving ethanol beyond being just a blending component in gasoline to a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. The two pilot programs, providing for an advanced biofuel variable blending pump trial and a hydrous ethanol trial, established by the State of Louisiana should be adopted by each and every state in our country.”

    State Agencies Must Purchase or Lease Vehicles That Use Alternative Fuels

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative further states, “The commissioner of administration shall not purchase or lease any motor vehicle for use by any state agency unless that vehicle is capable of and equipped for using an alternative fuel that results in lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, or particulates or any combination thereof that meet or exceed federal Clean Air Act standards.”

    Advanced Biofuel Price Preference for State Agencies

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative provides that a governmental body, state educational institution, or instrumentality of the state that performs essential governmental functions on a statewide or local basis is entitled to purchase E20, E30 or E85 advanced biofuel at a price equal to fifteen percent (15%) less per gallon than the price of unleaded gasoline for use in any motor vehicle.

    Economic Benefits

    The development of an advanced biofuel industry will help rebuild the local and regional economies devastated as a result of hurricanes Katrina and Rita by providing:

    (1) increased value to the feedstock crops which will benefit local farmers and provide more revenue to the local community;

    (2) increased investments in plants and equipment which will stimulate the local economy by providing construction jobs initially and the chance for full-time employment after the plant is completed;

    (3) secondary employment as associated industries develop due to plant co-products becoming available at a competitive price; and

    (4) increased local and state revenues collected from plant operations will stimulate local and state tax revenues and provide funds for improvements to the community and to the region.

    “Representative Perry and Senator Gautreaux have worked tirelessly to craft comprehensive advanced biofuel legislation which will maximize rural development, benefit consumers, farmers and gas station owners while also protecting the environment and reducing the burden on local water supplies,” said Donovan. “Representative Perry, Senator Gautreaux, and Dr. Strain, Commissioner of the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, should be praised for their leadership on this issue.”

    About Renergie

    Renergie was formed on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol. Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program. Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

  • Brian J. Donovan

    Baton Rouge, LA (September 8, 2008) – Governor Bobby Jindal has signed into law the Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative, the most comprehensive and far-reaching state legislation in the nation enacted to develop a statewide advanced biofuel industry. Louisiana is the first state to enact alternative transportation fuel legislation that includes a variable blending pump pilot program and a hydrous ethanol pilot program.

    Field-to-Pump Strategy

    The legislature found that the proper development of an advanced biofuel industry in Louisiana requires implementation of the following comprehensive “field-to-pump” strategy developed by Renergie, Inc.:

    (1) Feedstock Other Than Corn

    (a) derived solely from Louisiana harvested crops;

    (b) capable of an annual yield of at least 600 gallons of ethanol per acre;

    (c) requiring no more than one-half of the water required to grow corn;

    (d) tolerant to high temperature and waterlogging;

    (e) resistant to drought and saline-alkaline soils;

    (f) capable of being grown in marginal soils, ranging from heavy clay to light sand;

    (g) requiring no more than one-third of the nitrogen required to grow corn, thereby reducing the risk of

    contamination of the waters of the state; and

    (h) requiring no more than one-half of the energy necessary to convert corn into ethanol.

    (2) Decentralized Network of Small Advanced Biofuel Manufacturing Facilities

    Smaller is better. The distributed nature of a small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility network reduces feedstock supply risk, does not burden local water supplies and provides for broader based economic development. Each advanced biofuel manufacturing facility operating in Louisiana will produce no less than 5 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year and no more than 15 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year.

    (3) Market Expansion

    Advanced biofuel supply and demand shall be expanded beyond the 10% blend market by blending fuel-grade anhydrous ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump. Variable blending pumps, directly installed and operated at local gas stations by a qualified small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility, shall offer the consumer a less expensive substitute for unleaded gasoline in the form of E10, E20, E30 and E85.

    Pilot Programs

    (1) Advanced Biofuel Variable Blending Pumps – The blending of fuels with advanced biofuel percentages between 10 percent and 85 percent will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the equipment used to dispense the ethanol blends to ascertain that the equipment is suitable and capable of producing an accurate measurement.

    (2) Hydrous Ethanol – The use of hydrous ethanol blends of E10, E20, E30 and E85 in motor vehicles specifically selected for test purposes will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the performance of the motor vehicles. The hydrous blends will be tested for blend optimization with respect to fuel consumption and engine emissions. Preliminary tests conducted in Europe have proven that the use of hydrous ethanol, which eliminates the need for the hydrous-to-anhydrous dehydration processing step, results in an energy savings of between ten percent and forty-five percent during processing, a four percent product volume increase, higher mileage per gallon, a cleaner engine interior, and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

    Act No. 382, entitled “The Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative,” was co-authored by 27 members of the Legislature. The original bill was drafted by Renergie, Inc. Representative Jonathan W. Perry (R – District 47), with the support of Senator Nick Gautreaux (D – District 26), was the primary author of the bill. Reflecting on the signing of Act No. 382 into law, Brian J. Donovan, CEO of Renergie, Inc. said, “I am pleased that the legislature and governor of the great State of Louisiana have chosen to lead the nation in moving ethanol beyond being just a blending component in gasoline to a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. The two pilot programs, providing for an advanced biofuel variable blending pump trial and a hydrous ethanol trial, established by the State of Louisiana should be adopted by each and every state in our country.”

    State Agencies Must Purchase or Lease Vehicles That Use Alternative Fuels

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative further states, “The commissioner of administration shall not purchase or lease any motor vehicle for use by any state agency unless that vehicle is capable of and equipped for using an alternative fuel that results in lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, or particulates or any combination thereof that meet or exceed federal Clean Air Act standards.”

    Advanced Biofuel Price Preference for State Agencies

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative provides that a governmental body, state educational institution, or instrumentality of the state that performs essential governmental functions on a statewide or local basis is entitled to purchase E20, E30 or E85 advanced biofuel at a price equal to fifteen percent (15%) less per gallon than the price of unleaded gasoline for use in any motor vehicle.

    Economic Benefits

    The development of an advanced biofuel industry will help rebuild the local and regional economies devastated as a result of hurricanes Katrina and Rita by providing:

    (1) increased value to the feedstock crops which will benefit local farmers and provide more revenue to the local community;

    (2) increased investments in plants and equipment which will stimulate the local economy by providing construction jobs initially and the chance for full-time employment after the plant is completed;

    (3) secondary employment as associated industries develop due to plant co-products becoming available at a competitive price; and

    (4) increased local and state revenues collected from plant operations will stimulate local and state tax revenues and provide funds for improvements to the community and to the region.

    “Representative Perry and Senator Gautreaux have worked tirelessly to craft comprehensive advanced biofuel legislation which will maximize rural development, benefit consumers, farmers and gas station owners while also protecting the environment and reducing the burden on local water supplies,” said Donovan. “Representative Perry, Senator Gautreaux, and Dr. Strain, Commissioner of the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, should be praised for their leadership on this issue.”

    About Renergie

    Renergie was formed on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol. Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program. Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

  • Brian J. Donovan

    Louisiana Enacts the Most Comprehensive Advanced Biofuel Legislation in the Nation

    __________________

    Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative Benefits Consumers, Farmers and Gas Station Owners with Localized “Field-to-Pump” Strategy

    Baton Rouge, LA (September 10, 2008) – Governor Bobby Jindal has signed into law the Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative, the most comprehensive and far-reaching state legislation in the nation enacted to develop a statewide advanced biofuel industry. Louisiana is the first state to enact alternative transportation fuel legislation that includes a variable blending pump pilot program and a hydrous ethanol pilot program.

    Field-to-Pump Strategy

    The legislature found that the proper development of an advanced biofuel industry in Louisiana requires implementation of the following comprehensive “field-to-pump” strategy developed by Renergie, Inc.:

    (1) Feedstock Other Than Corn

    (a) derived solely from Louisiana harvested crops;

    (b) capable of an annual yield of at least 600 gallons of ethanol per acre;

    (c) requiring no more than one-half of the water required to grow corn;

    (d) tolerant to high temperature and waterlogging;

    (e) resistant to drought and saline-alkaline soils;

    (f) capable of being grown in marginal soils, ranging from heavy clay to light sand;

    (g) requiring no more than one-third of the nitrogen required to grow corn, thereby reducing the risk of contamination of the waters of the state; and

    (h) requiring no more than one-half of the energy necessary to convert corn into ethanol.

    (2) Decentralized Network of Small Advanced Biofuel Manufacturing Facilities

    Smaller is better. The distributed nature of a small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility network reduces feedstock supply risk, does not burden local water supplies and provides for broader based economic development. Each advanced biofuel manufacturing facility operating in Louisiana will produce no less than 5 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year and no more than 15 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year.

    (3) Market Expansion

    Advanced biofuel supply and demand shall be expanded beyond the 10% blend market by blending fuel-grade anhydrous ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump. Variable blending pumps, directly installed and operated at local gas stations by a qualified small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility, shall offer the consumer a less expensive substitute for unleaded gasoline in the form of E10, E20, E30 and E85.

    Pilot Programs

    (1) Advanced Biofuel Variable Blending Pumps – The blending of fuels with advanced biofuel percentages between 10 percent and 85 percent will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the equipment used to dispense the ethanol blends to ascertain that the equipment is suitable and capable of producing an accurate measurement.

    (2) Hydrous Ethanol – The use of hydrous ethanol blends of E10, E20, E30 and E85 in motor vehicles specifically selected for test purposes will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the performance of the motor vehicles. The hydrous blends will be tested for blend optimization with respect to fuel consumption and engine emissions. Preliminary tests conducted in Europe have proven that the use of hydrous ethanol, which eliminates the need for the hydrous-to-anhydrous dehydration processing step, results in an energy savings of between ten percent and forty-five percent during processing, a four percent product volume increase, higher mileage per gallon, a cleaner engine interior, and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

    Act No. 382, entitled “The Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative,” was co-authored by 27 members of the Legislature. The original bill was drafted by Renergie, Inc. Representative Jonathan W. Perry (R – District 47), with the support of Senator Nick Gautreaux (D – District 26), was the primary author of the bill. Reflecting on the signing of Act No. 382 into law, Brian J. Donovan, CEO of Renergie, Inc. said, “I am pleased that the legislature and governor of the great State of Louisiana have chosen to lead the nation in moving ethanol beyond being just a blending component in gasoline to a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. The two pilot programs, providing for an advanced biofuel variable blending pump trial and a hydrous ethanol trial, established by the State of Louisiana should be adopted by each and every state in our country.”

    State Agencies Must Purchase or Lease Vehicles That Use Alternative Fuels

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative further states, “The commissioner of administration shall not purchase or lease any motor vehicle for use by any state agency unless that vehicle is capable of and equipped for using an alternative fuel that results in lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, or particulates or any combination thereof that meet or exceed federal Clean Air Act standards.”

    Advanced Biofuel Price Preference for State Agencies

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative provides that a governmental body, state educational institution, or instrumentality of the state that performs essential governmental functions on a statewide or local basis is entitled to purchase E20, E30 or E85 advanced biofuel at a price equal to fifteen percent (15%) less per gallon than the price of unleaded gasoline for use in any motor vehicle.

    Economic Benefits

    The development of an advanced biofuel industry will help rebuild the local and regional economies devastated as a result of hurricanes Katrina and Rita by providing:

    (1) increased value to the feedstock crops which will benefit local farmers and provide more revenue to the local community;

    (2) increased investments in plants and equipment which will stimulate the local economy by providing construction jobs initially and the chance for full-time employment after the plant is completed;

    (3) secondary employment as associated industries develop due to plant co-products becoming available at a competitive price; and

    (4) increased local and state revenues collected from plant operations will stimulate local and state tax revenues and provide funds for improvements to the community and to the region.

    “Representative Perry and Senator Gautreaux have worked tirelessly to craft comprehensive advanced biofuel legislation which will maximize rural development, benefit consumers, farmers and gas station owners while also protecting the environment and reducing the burden on local water supplies,” said Donovan. “Representative Perry, Senator Gautreaux, and Dr. Strain, Commissioner of the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, should be praised for their leadership on this issue.”

    About Renergie

    Renergie was formed on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol. Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program. Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

  • Brian J. Donovan

    Louisiana Enacts the Most Comprehensive Advanced Biofuel Legislation in the Nation

    __________________

    Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative Benefits Consumers, Farmers and Gas Station Owners with Localized “Field-to-Pump” Strategy

    Baton Rouge, LA (September 10, 2008) – Governor Bobby Jindal has signed into law the Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative, the most comprehensive and far-reaching state legislation in the nation enacted to develop a statewide advanced biofuel industry. Louisiana is the first state to enact alternative transportation fuel legislation that includes a variable blending pump pilot program and a hydrous ethanol pilot program.

    Field-to-Pump Strategy

    The legislature found that the proper development of an advanced biofuel industry in Louisiana requires implementation of the following comprehensive “field-to-pump” strategy developed by Renergie, Inc.:

    (1) Feedstock Other Than Corn

    (a) derived solely from Louisiana harvested crops;

    (b) capable of an annual yield of at least 600 gallons of ethanol per acre;

    (c) requiring no more than one-half of the water required to grow corn;

    (d) tolerant to high temperature and waterlogging;

    (e) resistant to drought and saline-alkaline soils;

    (f) capable of being grown in marginal soils, ranging from heavy clay to light sand;

    (g) requiring no more than one-third of the nitrogen required to grow corn, thereby reducing the risk of contamination of the waters of the state; and

    (h) requiring no more than one-half of the energy necessary to convert corn into ethanol.

    (2) Decentralized Network of Small Advanced Biofuel Manufacturing Facilities

    Smaller is better. The distributed nature of a small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility network reduces feedstock supply risk, does not burden local water supplies and provides for broader based economic development. Each advanced biofuel manufacturing facility operating in Louisiana will produce no less than 5 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year and no more than 15 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year.

    (3) Market Expansion

    Advanced biofuel supply and demand shall be expanded beyond the 10% blend market by blending fuel-grade anhydrous ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump. Variable blending pumps, directly installed and operated at local gas stations by a qualified small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility, shall offer the consumer a less expensive substitute for unleaded gasoline in the form of E10, E20, E30 and E85.

    Pilot Programs

    (1) Advanced Biofuel Variable Blending Pumps – The blending of fuels with advanced biofuel percentages between 10 percent and 85 percent will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the equipment used to dispense the ethanol blends to ascertain that the equipment is suitable and capable of producing an accurate measurement.

    (2) Hydrous Ethanol – The use of hydrous ethanol blends of E10, E20, E30 and E85 in motor vehicles specifically selected for test purposes will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the performance of the motor vehicles. The hydrous blends will be tested for blend optimization with respect to fuel consumption and engine emissions. Preliminary tests conducted in Europe have proven that the use of hydrous ethanol, which eliminates the need for the hydrous-to-anhydrous dehydration processing step, results in an energy savings of between ten percent and forty-five percent during processing, a four percent product volume increase, higher mileage per gallon, a cleaner engine interior, and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

    Act No. 382, entitled “The Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative,” was co-authored by 27 members of the Legislature. The original bill was drafted by Renergie, Inc. Representative Jonathan W. Perry (R – District 47), with the support of Senator Nick Gautreaux (D – District 26), was the primary author of the bill. Reflecting on the signing of Act No. 382 into law, Brian J. Donovan, CEO of Renergie, Inc. said, “I am pleased that the legislature and governor of the great State of Louisiana have chosen to lead the nation in moving ethanol beyond being just a blending component in gasoline to a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. The two pilot programs, providing for an advanced biofuel variable blending pump trial and a hydrous ethanol trial, established by the State of Louisiana should be adopted by each and every state in our country.”

    State Agencies Must Purchase or Lease Vehicles That Use Alternative Fuels

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative further states, “The commissioner of administration shall not purchase or lease any motor vehicle for use by any state agency unless that vehicle is capable of and equipped for using an alternative fuel that results in lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, or particulates or any combination thereof that meet or exceed federal Clean Air Act standards.”

    Advanced Biofuel Price Preference for State Agencies

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative provides that a governmental body, state educational institution, or instrumentality of the state that performs essential governmental functions on a statewide or local basis is entitled to purchase E20, E30 or E85 advanced biofuel at a price equal to fifteen percent (15%) less per gallon than the price of unleaded gasoline for use in any motor vehicle.

    Economic Benefits

    The development of an advanced biofuel industry will help rebuild the local and regional economies devastated as a result of hurricanes Katrina and Rita by providing:

    (1) increased value to the feedstock crops which will benefit local farmers and provide more revenue to the local community;

    (2) increased investments in plants and equipment which will stimulate the local economy by providing construction jobs initially and the chance for full-time employment after the plant is completed;

    (3) secondary employment as associated industries develop due to plant co-products becoming available at a competitive price; and

    (4) increased local and state revenues collected from plant operations will stimulate local and state tax revenues and provide funds for improvements to the community and to the region.

    “Representative Perry and Senator Gautreaux have worked tirelessly to craft comprehensive advanced biofuel legislation which will maximize rural development, benefit consumers, farmers and gas station owners while also protecting the environment and reducing the burden on local water supplies,” said Donovan. “Representative Perry, Senator Gautreaux, and Dr. Strain, Commissioner of the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, should be praised for their leadership on this issue.”

    About Renergie

    Renergie was formed on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol. Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program. Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

  • Brian J. Donovan

    Louisiana Enacts the Most Comprehensive Advanced Biofuel Legislation in the Nation

    __________________

    Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative Benefits Consumers, Farmers and Gas Station Owners with Localized “Field-to-Pump” Strategy

    Baton Rouge, LA (September 10, 2008) – Governor Bobby Jindal has signed into law the Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative, the most comprehensive and far-reaching state legislation in the nation enacted to develop a statewide advanced biofuel industry. Louisiana is the first state to enact alternative transportation fuel legislation that includes a variable blending pump pilot program and a hydrous ethanol pilot program.

    Field-to-Pump Strategy

    The legislature found that the proper development of an advanced biofuel industry in Louisiana requires implementation of the following comprehensive “field-to-pump” strategy developed by Renergie, Inc.:

    (1) Feedstock Other Than Corn

    (a) derived solely from Louisiana harvested crops;

    (b) capable of an annual yield of at least 600 gallons of ethanol per acre;

    (c) requiring no more than one-half of the water required to grow corn;

    (d) tolerant to high temperature and waterlogging;

    (e) resistant to drought and saline-alkaline soils;

    (f) capable of being grown in marginal soils, ranging from heavy clay to light sand;

    (g) requiring no more than one-third of the nitrogen required to grow corn, thereby reducing the risk of contamination of the waters of the state; and

    (h) requiring no more than one-half of the energy necessary to convert corn into ethanol.

    (2) Decentralized Network of Small Advanced Biofuel Manufacturing Facilities

    Smaller is better. The distributed nature of a small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility network reduces feedstock supply risk, does not burden local water supplies and provides for broader based economic development. Each advanced biofuel manufacturing facility operating in Louisiana will produce no less than 5 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year and no more than 15 million gallons of advanced biofuel per year.

    (3) Market Expansion

    Advanced biofuel supply and demand shall be expanded beyond the 10% blend market by blending fuel-grade anhydrous ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump. Variable blending pumps, directly installed and operated at local gas stations by a qualified small advanced biofuel manufacturing facility, shall offer the consumer a less expensive substitute for unleaded gasoline in the form of E10, E20, E30 and E85.

    Pilot Programs

    (1) Advanced Biofuel Variable Blending Pumps – The blending of fuels with advanced biofuel percentages between 10 percent and 85 percent will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the equipment used to dispense the ethanol blends to ascertain that the equipment is suitable and capable of producing an accurate measurement.

    (2) Hydrous Ethanol – The use of hydrous ethanol blends of E10, E20, E30 and E85 in motor vehicles specifically selected for test purposes will be permitted on a trial basis until January 1, 2012. During this period the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry Division of Weights & Measures will monitor the performance of the motor vehicles. The hydrous blends will be tested for blend optimization with respect to fuel consumption and engine emissions. Preliminary tests conducted in Europe have proven that the use of hydrous ethanol, which eliminates the need for the hydrous-to-anhydrous dehydration processing step, results in an energy savings of between ten percent and forty-five percent during processing, a four percent product volume increase, higher mileage per gallon, a cleaner engine interior, and a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions.

    Act No. 382, entitled “The Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative,” was co-authored by 27 members of the Legislature. The original bill was drafted by Renergie, Inc. Representative Jonathan W. Perry (R – District 47), with the support of Senator Nick Gautreaux (D – District 26), was the primary author of the bill. Reflecting on the signing of Act No. 382 into law, Brian J. Donovan, CEO of Renergie, Inc. said, “I am pleased that the legislature and governor of the great State of Louisiana have chosen to lead the nation in moving ethanol beyond being just a blending component in gasoline to a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. The two pilot programs, providing for an advanced biofuel variable blending pump trial and a hydrous ethanol trial, established by the State of Louisiana should be adopted by each and every state in our country.”

    State Agencies Must Purchase or Lease Vehicles That Use Alternative Fuels

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative further states, “The commissioner of administration shall not purchase or lease any motor vehicle for use by any state agency unless that vehicle is capable of and equipped for using an alternative fuel that results in lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen, volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, or particulates or any combination thereof that meet or exceed federal Clean Air Act standards.”

    Advanced Biofuel Price Preference for State Agencies

    Louisiana’s Advanced Biofuel Industry Development Initiative provides that a governmental body, state educational institution, or instrumentality of the state that performs essential governmental functions on a statewide or local basis is entitled to purchase E20, E30 or E85 advanced biofuel at a price equal to fifteen percent (15%) less per gallon than the price of unleaded gasoline for use in any motor vehicle.

    Economic Benefits

    The development of an advanced biofuel industry will help rebuild the local and regional economies devastated as a result of hurricanes Katrina and Rita by providing:

    (1) increased value to the feedstock crops which will benefit local farmers and provide more revenue to the local community;

    (2) increased investments in plants and equipment which will stimulate the local economy by providing construction jobs initially and the chance for full-time employment after the plant is completed;

    (3) secondary employment as associated industries develop due to plant co-products becoming available at a competitive price; and

    (4) increased local and state revenues collected from plant operations will stimulate local and state tax revenues and provide funds for improvements to the community and to the region.

    “Representative Perry and Senator Gautreaux have worked tirelessly to craft comprehensive advanced biofuel legislation which will maximize rural development, benefit consumers, farmers and gas station owners while also protecting the environment and reducing the burden on local water supplies,” said Donovan. “Representative Perry, Senator Gautreaux, and Dr. Strain, Commissioner of the Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry, should be praised for their leadership on this issue.”

    About Renergie

    Renergie was formed on March 22, 2006 for the purpose of raising capital to develop, construct, own and operate a network of ten ethanol plants in the parishes of the State of Louisiana which were devastated by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Each ethanol plant will have a production capacity of five million gallons per year (5 MGY) of fuel-grade ethanol. Renergie’s “field-to-pump” strategy is to produce non-corn ethanol locally and directly market non-corn ethanol locally. On February 26, 2008, Renergie was one of 8 recipients, selected from 139 grant applicants, to share $12.5 million from the Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s Renewable Energy Technologies Grants Program. Renergie received $1,500,483 (partial funding) in grant money to design and build Florida’s first ethanol plant capable of producing fuel-grade ethanol solely from sweet sorghum juice. On April 2, 2008, Enterprise Florida, Inc., the state’s economic development organization, selected Renergie as one of Florida’s most innovative technology companies in the alternative energy sector. By blending fuel-grade ethanol with gasoline at the gas station pump, Renergie will offer the consumer a fuel that is more economical, cleaner, renewable, and more efficient than unleaded gasoline. Moreover, the Renergie project will mark the first time that Louisiana farmers will share in the profits realized from the sale of value-added products made from their crops.

  • Steve-O

    Americo says the 54% tarrif on Brazillian ethanol is wrong. I agree, I am an american. Why have that when we import 70% of outr petroleum, makes no sense at all. They are pretty much the world leaders in ethanol, lets open our markets to it. They are opened up to cheap asian manufactured goods that are not as important to us as green energy is. Also, good move Suzuki!

  • Steve-O

    Americo says the 54% tarrif on Brazillian ethanol is wrong. I agree, I am an american. Why have that when we import 70% of outr petroleum, makes no sense at all. They are pretty much the world leaders in ethanol, lets open our markets to it. They are opened up to cheap asian manufactured goods that are not as important to us as green energy is. Also, good move Suzuki!

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