Ethanol no image

Published on June 13th, 2008 | by Nick Chambers

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Prototype Ford Escape Plug-in Hybrid: 88 MPG on 85% Ethanol

Ford Escape Flex-Fuel PHEV

[social_buttons] First Flex-Fuel Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle

As part of a push by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to make plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) cost competitive with other cars by 2014, Ford has delivered a plug-in hybrid electric flex-fuel Escape to the DOE to join its test fleet of other PHEVs currently undergoing research and testing.

The vehicle is equipped with a 10 kilowatt lithium ion battery that can take it up to 30 miles at speeds under 40 mph before needing to fire up its fuel-fed hybrid-electric engine. After that, the hybrid-electric engine kicks in and can deliver a fuel economy of 88 mpg in the city and 50 mpg on the highway when using E85 (85% ethanol/15% gasoline blend).

This means that for most people in the US, they would only have to use fuel in this vehicle once or twice a week with the rest of their driving needs covered by the battery.

According to Ford, this is the first ever flex-fuel PHEV capable of running on E85.

Ford claims that, based on current estimates, the Escape Flex-Fuel PHEV would emit 60% less carbon dioxide than a conventional gasoline powered vehicle. Ford also states that if cellulosic E85 fuel was used, that carbon dioxide reduction could be as high as 90%.

I’m assuming the “as high as 90%” reduction claim is based on the fact that cellulosic ethanol is typically derived from plant material and the growth of these feedstocks can represent an additional carbon sink — not that Ford thinks cellulosic ethanol provides lower carbon dioxide emissions compared to corn ethanol when combusted.

In addition to taking delivery of the Escape Flex-Fuel PHEV, DOE announced that $30 million will be made available over the next three years to fund PHEV demonstration and development projects with industry cooperation. The goal is to develop PHEVs that can be mass produced, compete effectively in the marketplace, and substantially reduce petroleum consumption.

Posts related to PHEVs and Cellulosic Ethanol:

Image Credit: Ford Motor Company



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  • http://ooyes.net web design company

    Can we please stop quoting MPG ratings for plug-in hybrids? It’s ridiculous given the fact that there is another source of motive energy that’s purpose is to displace the use of gasoline in this vehicle. We might as well start citing highway performance when driving downhill only or MPG with two people pushing the car for half the trip.

  • http://ooyes.net web design company

    Can we please stop quoting MPG ratings for plug-in hybrids? It’s ridiculous given the fact that there is another source of motive energy that’s purpose is to displace the use of gasoline in this vehicle. We might as well start citing highway performance when driving downhill only or MPG with two people pushing the car for half the trip.

  • http://ooyes.net web design company

    Can we please stop quoting MPG ratings for plug-in hybrids? It’s ridiculous given the fact that there is another source of motive energy that’s purpose is to displace the use of gasoline in this vehicle. We might as well start citing highway performance when driving downhill only or MPG with two people pushing the car for half the trip.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Yeah, but it’s important to give people a point of comparison. It could be more accurate for everyone to start using Miles per Gallon of Gasoline Equivalent (MPGe), which (wikipedia) is a unit of measurement that relates efficiencies of different systems to the traditional unit of measurement for fuel efficiency (miles per gallon of gasoline).

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Yeah, but it’s important to give people a point of comparison. It could be more accurate for everyone to start using Miles per Gallon of Gasoline Equivalent (MPGe), which (wikipedia) is a unit of measurement that relates efficiencies of different systems to the traditional unit of measurement for fuel efficiency (miles per gallon of gasoline).

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Yeah, but it’s important to give people a point of comparison. It could be more accurate for everyone to start using Miles per Gallon of Gasoline Equivalent (MPGe), which (wikipedia) is a unit of measurement that relates efficiencies of different systems to the traditional unit of measurement for fuel efficiency (miles per gallon of gasoline).

  • Noin

    Move over to the metric system.

    Imperial shit sucks.

  • Noin

    Move over to the metric system.

    Imperial shit sucks.

  • John thomas

    Now THAT is one good looking SUV. First “Smart” car I have seen that I would actually drive. Very nice!

    JT

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • John thomas

    Now THAT is one good looking SUV. First “Smart” car I have seen that I would actually drive. Very nice!

    JT

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • John thomas

    Now THAT is one good looking SUV. First “Smart” car I have seen that I would actually drive. Very nice!

    JT

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • John C Thomas

    Nice. Finally, a Green car I would actually consider driving. Looks very good, with good MPG to boot, I am all over it!

    John Tomas

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • John C Thomas

    Nice. Finally, a Green car I would actually consider driving. Looks very good, with good MPG to boot, I am all over it!

    John Tomas

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • John C Thomas

    Nice. Finally, a Green car I would actually consider driving. Looks very good, with good MPG to boot, I am all over it!

    John Tomas

    http://www.FireMe.To/udi

  • http://digg.com guestt

    What’s more, a plug-in car with a good Li-ion battery may not even need gasoline for day to day travel (i.e. From home to work and back)

  • http://digg.com guestt

    What’s more, a plug-in car with a good Li-ion battery may not even need gasoline for day to day travel (i.e. From home to work and back)

  • http://digg.com guestt

    What’s more, a plug-in car with a good Li-ion battery may not even need gasoline for day to day travel (i.e. From home to work and back)

  • Curt

    Ford won’t build too many of these vehicles. I’ve seen an article mentioning that Ford has placed a cap on their production of Escape hybrid vehicles simply because the vehicles do not generate as much profit as their gas counterpart. Another problem is that there are only a few stations offering E85. Why would the large gas companies sell a product that they don’t control ?

  • Curt

    Ford won’t build too many of these vehicles. I’ve seen an article mentioning that Ford has placed a cap on their production of Escape hybrid vehicles simply because the vehicles do not generate as much profit as their gas counterpart. Another problem is that there are only a few stations offering E85. Why would the large gas companies sell a product that they don’t control ?

  • Curt

    Ford won’t build too many of these vehicles. I’ve seen an article mentioning that Ford has placed a cap on their production of Escape hybrid vehicles simply because the vehicles do not generate as much profit as their gas counterpart. Another problem is that there are only a few stations offering E85. Why would the large gas companies sell a product that they don’t control ?

  • http://trai.name TDave

    I don’t see a problem with the way the fuel efficiency was described in the article. It states that it can go 30 miles at speeds under 40 on a charged 10 kilowatt battery, and after that the electric-hybrid kicks in giving 80mpg in the city and 50mpg on the highway. What’s hard to understand about that? I do agree that with the mixed power sources it would be nice to have some type of fuel measurement that covers the spectrum of electric and liquid fuels.

  • http://trai.name TDave

    I don’t see a problem with the way the fuel efficiency was described in the article. It states that it can go 30 miles at speeds under 40 on a charged 10 kilowatt battery, and after that the electric-hybrid kicks in giving 80mpg in the city and 50mpg on the highway. What’s hard to understand about that? I do agree that with the mixed power sources it would be nice to have some type of fuel measurement that covers the spectrum of electric and liquid fuels.

  • http://trai.name TDave

    I don’t see a problem with the way the fuel efficiency was described in the article. It states that it can go 30 miles at speeds under 40 on a charged 10 kilowatt battery, and after that the electric-hybrid kicks in giving 80mpg in the city and 50mpg on the highway. What’s hard to understand about that? I do agree that with the mixed power sources it would be nice to have some type of fuel measurement that covers the spectrum of electric and liquid fuels.

  • Nick Chambers

    @TDave

    Thank you. You just made my night. You wouldn’t believe the amount of misunderstanding there is regarding PHEVs and how to rate efficiency with a two mode vehicle. Straight electric – easy; Full hybrid electric – easy; Plug-in Hybrid Electric with two means of powering the wheels – Difficult. I tried to make it as clear as possible, but it seems that it is still an elusive idea for many people to wrap their heads around.

  • Arkansas

    Why not include MPG in a vehicle that uses gas? It still uses gas, and as you can see it is necessary to demonstrate how much better fuel economy one gets with this hybrid over other hybrids and regular engines. When there is a vehicle that is driven solely by something other than gasoline, then you have a valid point and MPGs will not be used. Until then, I suggest you get used to the fact that the consumer needs the MPG rating on all vehicles that use gasoline to help make decisions that affect their budget for fueling their vehicle.

    I’d prefer to be able to estimate how often it will cost me to fill up at the prices we are paying than not know by your suggestion of not including them. And, you are incorrect in saying there is another source of motive energy. It is not another source, it is an additional source that has a symbiotic relationship with gasoline. “The vehicle is equipped with a 10 kilowatt lithium ion battery that can take it up to 30 miles at speeds under 40 mph before needing to fire up its fuel-fed hybrid-electric engine.” See? The batteries need the gasoline to kick in or else the batteries will not charge up, thus the necessity for an MPG rating since one will be using fuel to drive the vehicle over a given distance. And, as you can clearly see, the MPG rating goes down on the highway since it uses the gasoline to sustain highway speeds. Gotta have the rating, so deal with it.

  • Arkansas

    Why not include MPG in a vehicle that uses gas? It still uses gas, and as you can see it is necessary to demonstrate how much better fuel economy one gets with this hybrid over other hybrids and regular engines. When there is a vehicle that is driven solely by something other than gasoline, then you have a valid point and MPGs will not be used. Until then, I suggest you get used to the fact that the consumer needs the MPG rating on all vehicles that use gasoline to help make decisions that affect their budget for fueling their vehicle.

    I’d prefer to be able to estimate how often it will cost me to fill up at the prices we are paying than not know by your suggestion of not including them. And, you are incorrect in saying there is another source of motive energy. It is not another source, it is an additional source that has a symbiotic relationship with gasoline. “The vehicle is equipped with a 10 kilowatt lithium ion battery that can take it up to 30 miles at speeds under 40 mph before needing to fire up its fuel-fed hybrid-electric engine.” See? The batteries need the gasoline to kick in or else the batteries will not charge up, thus the necessity for an MPG rating since one will be using fuel to drive the vehicle over a given distance. And, as you can clearly see, the MPG rating goes down on the highway since it uses the gasoline to sustain highway speeds. Gotta have the rating, so deal with it.

  • Space

    10 kW is 13 hp, which is clearly not enough to get that kind of vehicle moving.

    Whoever wrote this article doesn’t understand what all these figures mean.

    So I bet that there is a catch on the “88 MPG” claim.

    If that mileage was not obtained by draining the battery, then there would be some kind of new engine efficiency improvement that is unrelated with the battery…

    and there is no word on that in the article.

  • Space

    10 kW is 13 hp, which is clearly not enough to get that kind of vehicle moving.

    Whoever wrote this article doesn’t understand what all these figures mean.

    So I bet that there is a catch on the “88 MPG” claim.

    If that mileage was not obtained by draining the battery, then there would be some kind of new engine efficiency improvement that is unrelated with the battery…

    and there is no word on that in the article.

  • Space

    10 kW is 13 hp, which is clearly not enough to get that kind of vehicle moving.

    Whoever wrote this article doesn’t understand what all these figures mean.

    So I bet that there is a catch on the “88 MPG” claim.

    If that mileage was not obtained by draining the battery, then there would be some kind of new engine efficiency improvement that is unrelated with the battery…

    and there is no word on that in the article.

  • Nick Chambers

    @Space

    I wrote this article. I didn’t make up the stats, they were provided by Ford. Check out the links in the article for more information.

  • jpm100

    “The vehicle is equipped with a 10 kilowatt advanced lithium ion energy battery supplied by Johnson-Controls/Saft that stores enough electric energy to drive up to 30 miles at speeds of up to 40 mph. When fueled by E85 ethanol, which has a lower energy content than gasoline, fuel economy can reach up to 88 mpg in urban driving and up to 50 mpg on the highway”

    There are countless ways to interpret this.

    My way is that following the EPA cycles, this vehicle, starting on a full charge will achieve 88/50 until the battery levels out.

    88/50, purely in hybrid mode, is a little much to expect from an Escape running on Ethanol.

  • jpm100

    “The vehicle is equipped with a 10 kilowatt advanced lithium ion energy battery supplied by Johnson-Controls/Saft that stores enough electric energy to drive up to 30 miles at speeds of up to 40 mph. When fueled by E85 ethanol, which has a lower energy content than gasoline, fuel economy can reach up to 88 mpg in urban driving and up to 50 mpg on the highway”

    There are countless ways to interpret this.

    My way is that following the EPA cycles, this vehicle, starting on a full charge will achieve 88/50 until the battery levels out.

    88/50, purely in hybrid mode, is a little much to expect from an Escape running on Ethanol.

  • jpm100

    “The vehicle is equipped with a 10 kilowatt advanced lithium ion energy battery supplied by Johnson-Controls/Saft that stores enough electric energy to drive up to 30 miles at speeds of up to 40 mph. When fueled by E85 ethanol, which has a lower energy content than gasoline, fuel economy can reach up to 88 mpg in urban driving and up to 50 mpg on the highway”

    There are countless ways to interpret this.

    My way is that following the EPA cycles, this vehicle, starting on a full charge will achieve 88/50 until the battery levels out.

    88/50, purely in hybrid mode, is a little much to expect from an Escape running on Ethanol.

  • Nick Chambers

    @jpm100

    True, there could be other ways to interpret this statement, and Ford and the DOE are being pretty unclear with their numbers. However, the rest of the Ford press release makes it clear that it has two separate driving modes and talks about electricity use and fuel economy separately…

    Plus, given the advances in technology recently, it’s not that difficult for me to believe that a car like this is capable of 88/50 fuel economy in hybrid mode. Also, at speeds over 40 mph the car has to use the hybrid mode so any fuel economy rating for highway driving would have to be based solely on hybrid mode.

  • Noisi

    Why have ethanol? There would be a considerably smaller impact on the environment if it went pure electric. Too bad for shoddy chemical batteries though.

  • Noisi

    Why have ethanol? There would be a considerably smaller impact on the environment if it went pure electric. Too bad for shoddy chemical batteries though.

  • Noisi

    Why have ethanol? There would be a considerably smaller impact on the environment if it went pure electric. Too bad for shoddy chemical batteries though.

  • Aaron

    Two things I’ve read in the comments:

    Something about there not being a lot of E-85 stations being a problem. Well this is a Flex-Fuel Vehicle, it will run on regular 87 octane (or 89 or 93). Also it will run on any mix of gas and ethanol up to a 15/85 mix. So you don’t have to wait until E to fill up with a different fuel. (Before I get people arguing this I’m an engineer who has worked with New York State to install about 40 E-85 stations.)

    I believe that 10 kW is not a measurement of output but storage capacity for the batteries. That means that charging the battery at night would require about $1.20 in electric. Charges vary by location in New York I pay about 14.5 per kW so for me it would cost a whole $1.45 to drive to work each day.

  • Aaron

    Two things I’ve read in the comments:

    Something about there not being a lot of E-85 stations being a problem. Well this is a Flex-Fuel Vehicle, it will run on regular 87 octane (or 89 or 93). Also it will run on any mix of gas and ethanol up to a 15/85 mix. So you don’t have to wait until E to fill up with a different fuel. (Before I get people arguing this I’m an engineer who has worked with New York State to install about 40 E-85 stations.)

    I believe that 10 kW is not a measurement of output but storage capacity for the batteries. That means that charging the battery at night would require about $1.20 in electric. Charges vary by location in New York I pay about 14.5 per kW so for me it would cost a whole $1.45 to drive to work each day.

  • Aaron

    Two things I’ve read in the comments:

    Something about there not being a lot of E-85 stations being a problem. Well this is a Flex-Fuel Vehicle, it will run on regular 87 octane (or 89 or 93). Also it will run on any mix of gas and ethanol up to a 15/85 mix. So you don’t have to wait until E to fill up with a different fuel. (Before I get people arguing this I’m an engineer who has worked with New York State to install about 40 E-85 stations.)

    I believe that 10 kW is not a measurement of output but storage capacity for the batteries. That means that charging the battery at night would require about $1.20 in electric. Charges vary by location in New York I pay about 14.5 per kW so for me it would cost a whole $1.45 to drive to work each day.

  • Alex

    If only there was a engine that used a fuel available anywhere. this engine would be useable by trucks and trains and a elite few of VW drivers.

  • Alex

    If only there was a engine that used a fuel available anywhere. this engine would be useable by trucks and trains and a elite few of VW drivers.

  • Alex

    If only there was a engine that used a fuel available anywhere. this engine would be useable by trucks and trains and a elite few of VW drivers.

  • jpm100

    “If only there was a engine that used a fuel available anywhere. this engine would be useable by trucks and trains and a elite few of VW drivers.”

    Such an engine cost substantial more. Partly because the engine itself needs to be more durable, but also the exhaust system requires extensive filtration to meet US emissions.

  • jpm100

    “If only there was a engine that used a fuel available anywhere. this engine would be useable by trucks and trains and a elite few of VW drivers.”

    Such an engine cost substantial more. Partly because the engine itself needs to be more durable, but also the exhaust system requires extensive filtration to meet US emissions.

  • jpm100

    “If only there was a engine that used a fuel available anywhere. this engine would be useable by trucks and trains and a elite few of VW drivers.”

    Such an engine cost substantial more. Partly because the engine itself needs to be more durable, but also the exhaust system requires extensive filtration to meet US emissions.

  • Peter

    The problem I have with hybrids is that you have to replace the batteries every few years at a cost of several thousand dollars negating any gas savings.

  • Peter

    The problem I have with hybrids is that you have to replace the batteries every few years at a cost of several thousand dollars negating any gas savings.

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  • Sam

    Hopefully these batteries won’t explode or catch on fire like they did a few years ago in laptops. And what do you do with all these used batteries?

  • Sam

    Hopefully these batteries won’t explode or catch on fire like they did a few years ago in laptops. And what do you do with all these used batteries?

  • Sam

    Hopefully these batteries won’t explode or catch on fire like they did a few years ago in laptops. And what do you do with all these used batteries?

  • http://FCN Marko

    The OEM’s have to start somewhere. Give them time to proveout the design before complaining about the fuel economy numbering system. This thing works and could by itself save Americans B$$$$’s in fuel bills. Anyone going to argue about that?????

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  • http://www.avcg.net/clth Arthur

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has set a goal to validate a high quality feedstock supply for ethanol from cellulosic biomass of 130 million dry tons p/ year by 2012 and 250 million dry tons p/year by 2017. *1

    The DOE has set target goals for feedstock costs (i.e. harvesting, storage, preprocessing and transportation excluding the cost paid for biomass) of $0.37 per gallon in 2012 and $0.33 per gallon in 2017.

    Of the 245 million tons of waste generated annually in the United States, at least 50% is cellulosic biomass, representing a potential source of 120 million tons of feedstock per year.

    The nation’s and world’s appetite for such a system is almost unlimited. Americans produce 4.4 pounds of waste per person per day, or 229 million1 tons annually nationwide. At the estimated conversion rate of these technologies of 52 gallons of ethanol per ton of garbage, this MSW represents a potential fuel source of over 6.5 billion gallons of ethanol per year. Current annual targets of both the Administration and Congress for future domestic ethanol production are about 35 billion gallons, and CleanTech’s system will help the U.S. meet this goal.

    CleanTech Biofuels Addresses Rising Global Food Costs and Sustainable Waste to Energy Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Solutions – Aurora Venture Communications Group is now featuring an online webcast audio interview with Mr. Michael Kime, COO of CleanTech Biofuels, Inc., who also Co-Wrote and Co-Produced the award winning feature documentary, “Can Mr. Smith Get to Washington Anymore”. The interview covers a range of topics including Mr. Kime’s personal insights into the conflux of environmental and political forces that are driving the market and the media’s interest in waste-to-energy technology. The interview can be found online at: http://www.avcg.net/CLTH.

    CEO of CleanTech Biofuels, Inc., Edward Hennessey, commented: “As ethanol production from food crops has exploded in recent years, there are increasing concerns over the amount of arable land once used for food production being displaced for energy crops. Additionally, concerns have been raised regarding the energy and pollution balance of other methods of ethanol production. Consequently our business model which leverages the existing infrastructure for municipal solid waste collection and disposal to collect biomass at a low or negative feedstock cost is beginning to receive the recognition we feel it deserves.”

    Hennessey further stated: “We believe that we will achieve profitability quickly relative to other cellulosic ethanol producers who must develop their infrastructure to collect and transport more expensive feedstocks such as switchgrass, wood waste, or corn stover. Moreover, biomass derived from garbage should not be subject to increases in commodity prices that plague producers currently manufacturing ethanol from corn.”

  • http://www.avcg.net/clth Arthur

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has set a goal to validate a high quality feedstock supply for ethanol from cellulosic biomass of 130 million dry tons p/ year by 2012 and 250 million dry tons p/year by 2017. *1

    The DOE has set target goals for feedstock costs (i.e. harvesting, storage, preprocessing and transportation excluding the cost paid for biomass) of $0.37 per gallon in 2012 and $0.33 per gallon in 2017.

    Of the 245 million tons of waste generated annually in the United States, at least 50% is cellulosic biomass, representing a potential source of 120 million tons of feedstock per year.

    The nation’s and world’s appetite for such a system is almost unlimited. Americans produce 4.4 pounds of waste per person per day, or 229 million1 tons annually nationwide. At the estimated conversion rate of these technologies of 52 gallons of ethanol per ton of garbage, this MSW represents a potential fuel source of over 6.5 billion gallons of ethanol per year. Current annual targets of both the Administration and Congress for future domestic ethanol production are about 35 billion gallons, and CleanTech’s system will help the U.S. meet this goal.

    CleanTech Biofuels Addresses Rising Global Food Costs and Sustainable Waste to Energy Cellulosic Ethanol Technology Solutions – Aurora Venture Communications Group is now featuring an online webcast audio interview with Mr. Michael Kime, COO of CleanTech Biofuels, Inc., who also Co-Wrote and Co-Produced the award winning feature documentary, “Can Mr. Smith Get to Washington Anymore”. The interview covers a range of topics including Mr. Kime’s personal insights into the conflux of environmental and political forces that are driving the market and the media’s interest in waste-to-energy technology. The interview can be found online at: http://www.avcg.net/CLTH.

    CEO of CleanTech Biofuels, Inc., Edward Hennessey, commented: “As ethanol production from food crops has exploded in recent years, there are increasing concerns over the amount of arable land once used for food production being displaced for energy crops. Additionally, concerns have been raised regarding the energy and pollution balance of other methods of ethanol production. Consequently our business model which leverages the existing infrastructure for municipal solid waste collection and disposal to collect biomass at a low or negative feedstock cost is beginning to receive the recognition we feel it deserves.”

    Hennessey further stated: “We believe that we will achieve profitability quickly relative to other cellulosic ethanol producers who must develop their infrastructure to collect and transport more expensive feedstocks such as switchgrass, wood waste, or corn stover. Moreover, biomass derived from garbage should not be subject to increases in commodity prices that plague producers currently manufacturing ethanol from corn.”

  • Colin

    Why they are always obliged to make huge-size pick up or SUV ??? If american customers and companies focus one second in Europe, They will see more small and fuel-efficient cars, still really safe and pleasant to drive. SUV and pick up are useless if you are not a farmer or live in the montain, that’s it!

  • Colin

    Why they are always obliged to make huge-size pick up or SUV ??? If american customers and companies focus one second in Europe, They will see more small and fuel-efficient cars, still really safe and pleasant to drive. SUV and pick up are useless if you are not a farmer or live in the montain, that’s it!

  • Grady

    I’m sick of hearing about how the big automakers have made a concept car, or delivered a prototype or demonstrated the feasibility of such and such. They could be, and should be, mass producing these NOW. If small companies like Th!nk can make it happen, so can they.

  • Grady

    I’m sick of hearing about how the big automakers have made a concept car, or delivered a prototype or demonstrated the feasibility of such and such. They could be, and should be, mass producing these NOW. If small companies like Th!nk can make it happen, so can they.

  • Grady

    I’m sick of hearing about how the big automakers have made a concept car, or delivered a prototype or demonstrated the feasibility of such and such. They could be, and should be, mass producing these NOW. If small companies like Th!nk can make it happen, so can they.

  • http://www.j34whitestar.com tdevoe

    The whole point is that for most of use who live in the town where we work, we could reasonably drive back and forth to work without gas! I drive a Mariner Hybrid now and based on those fuel savings it would pay to trade it in today if I could. I’m really excited about this technology. I have heard some talk about additional Tax incentives for these vehicles as well. Count me in!

  • http://www.j34whitestar.com tdevoe

    The whole point is that for most of use who live in the town where we work, we could reasonably drive back and forth to work without gas! I drive a Mariner Hybrid now and based on those fuel savings it would pay to trade it in today if I could. I’m really excited about this technology. I have heard some talk about additional Tax incentives for these vehicles as well. Count me in!

  • http://www.j34whitestar.com tdevoe

    The whole point is that for most of use who live in the town where we work, we could reasonably drive back and forth to work without gas! I drive a Mariner Hybrid now and based on those fuel savings it would pay to trade it in today if I could. I’m really excited about this technology. I have heard some talk about additional Tax incentives for these vehicles as well. Count me in!

  • http://UTUBE Herman Noronha

    I have seen on UTUBE website that people are using Water to inhance HYDROGEN and they run their car more effectiently and more Milage per Gallon have you looked in this website and open your mind into this Tecnology,Free energy and clean energy and good for the enviorment

  • Andy

    This is a car that I would gladly trade-in my new Bimmer for. And my wife’s truck! I’m an old engineer and I admire the excellent engineering that Ford is doing on hybrids. We will be in line to buy two……………

  • Andy

    This is a car that I would gladly trade-in my new Bimmer for. And my wife’s truck! I’m an old engineer and I admire the excellent engineering that Ford is doing on hybrids. We will be in line to buy two……………

  • Andy

    This is a car that I would gladly trade-in my new Bimmer for. And my wife’s truck! I’m an old engineer and I admire the excellent engineering that Ford is doing on hybrids. We will be in line to buy two……………

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  • Joe

    The one thing to keep in mind about plug-in (electric) cars is that they still require energy from electricity. Currently, 40% of the world’s electricity is produced from coal. That percent is even higher in the US.

    Coal is not always “clean burning” and it is not very renewable – unless you’re willing to wait a few million years! The US does have a very large supply of coal, I’ll admit, but it is not sustainable and creates other environmental effects (ie. visit West Virginia sometime).

    Further, the US power grid, in its current shape, would not be able to handle a large scale increase in demand from electric cars.

    Although I believe these new automobile technologies are necessary to make future advancements, electric cars are not a long-term solution. I believe a multi-national effort to develop a sustainable power source and potentially a new type of engine (non-cumbustion engine?) would create world-wide benefits.

    Finally, for those of you who like E85, stop by Iowa, Illinois, or Indiana sometime. Land purchase and lease prices are rising quickly and due to farmers cashing in on the demand for corn, other crops are going up in price due to lack of their production. Soy beans and wheat, in particular, along with corn prices going up will affect the prices of many ites that we consume everyday including soda, cereal, plastics, and the feed used for cattle, hogs, and fish farms. The side effects E85 and ethenol has had a wiplash effect on the economy as a whole. There are serious concerns about the government mandates to include even more ethenol in the future. We’ll have to wait and see how that plays out!

  • Joe

    The one thing to keep in mind about plug-in (electric) cars is that they still require energy from electricity. Currently, 40% of the world’s electricity is produced from coal. That percent is even higher in the US.

    Coal is not always “clean burning” and it is not very renewable – unless you’re willing to wait a few million years! The US does have a very large supply of coal, I’ll admit, but it is not sustainable and creates other environmental effects (ie. visit West Virginia sometime).

    Further, the US power grid, in its current shape, would not be able to handle a large scale increase in demand from electric cars.

    Although I believe these new automobile technologies are necessary to make future advancements, electric cars are not a long-term solution. I believe a multi-national effort to develop a sustainable power source and potentially a new type of engine (non-cumbustion engine?) would create world-wide benefits.

    Finally, for those of you who like E85, stop by Iowa, Illinois, or Indiana sometime. Land purchase and lease prices are rising quickly and due to farmers cashing in on the demand for corn, other crops are going up in price due to lack of their production. Soy beans and wheat, in particular, along with corn prices going up will affect the prices of many ites that we consume everyday including soda, cereal, plastics, and the feed used for cattle, hogs, and fish farms. The side effects E85 and ethenol has had a wiplash effect on the economy as a whole. There are serious concerns about the government mandates to include even more ethenol in the future. We’ll have to wait and see how that plays out!

  • http://www.mpg-ratings.com Mpg Ratings

    MPG ratings for the fuel that goes into a car like this is not a true reflection of what it takes to run the thing. Also from a green perspective the production of the electricity also produces emissions which aren’t quoted. It all needs to be taken into account.

  • http://www.mpg-ratings.com Mpg Ratings

    MPG ratings for the fuel that goes into a car like this is not a true reflection of what it takes to run the thing. Also from a green perspective the production of the electricity also produces emissions which aren’t quoted. It all needs to be taken into account.

  • ChuckL

    The e-85 is a bad choice. H*** ethanol in any ratio is a bad choice. It is just too low on energy content.

    Why the H*** don’t these characters use a diesel engine in a hybrid? AND while they’re at it. decouple the engine from the drive train and let it just power a generator. It only needs to be large enough to maintain a reasonably high cruising speed for cross country trips. This way they could use a motor in each wheel to give excellent stability control as well as great bad weather traction and tte engine could run at best efficiency rating except where more power was needed on the long trip at higher speeds. The motors could also be built to provide regenerative braking capability.

  • ChuckL

    The e-85 is a bad choice. H*** ethanol in any ratio is a bad choice. It is just too low on energy content.

    Why the H*** don’t these characters use a diesel engine in a hybrid? AND while they’re at it. decouple the engine from the drive train and let it just power a generator. It only needs to be large enough to maintain a reasonably high cruising speed for cross country trips. This way they could use a motor in each wheel to give excellent stability control as well as great bad weather traction and tte engine could run at best efficiency rating except where more power was needed on the long trip at higher speeds. The motors could also be built to provide regenerative braking capability.

  • ChuckL

    The e-85 is a bad choice. H*** ethanol in any ratio is a bad choice. It is just too low on energy content.

    Why the H*** don’t these characters use a diesel engine in a hybrid? AND while they’re at it. decouple the engine from the drive train and let it just power a generator. It only needs to be large enough to maintain a reasonably high cruising speed for cross country trips. This way they could use a motor in each wheel to give excellent stability control as well as great bad weather traction and tte engine could run at best efficiency rating except where more power was needed on the long trip at higher speeds. The motors could also be built to provide regenerative braking capability.

  • ChuckL

    A proposed solution to the fuel economy (MPG) problem.

    It should not be too difficult to report the distance traveled based on the gallon equivalent of gasoline. Or we could use Kwh equivalents, or you pick the standard that will used to report on the energy used per unit distance.

    It seems to me that once upon a time one of my buddies calculated something in “farts per furlong”.

    Since this is just a simple calculation of energy required to move something a given distance, all we need is the weight of the something, the energy content of the fuel per unit volume, and the distance moved. A simple spreadsheet should suffice and most of the information needed should be available from physics reference books.

  • ChuckL

    A proposed solution to the fuel economy (MPG) problem.

    It should not be too difficult to report the distance traveled based on the gallon equivalent of gasoline. Or we could use Kwh equivalents, or you pick the standard that will used to report on the energy used per unit distance.

    It seems to me that once upon a time one of my buddies calculated something in “farts per furlong”.

    Since this is just a simple calculation of energy required to move something a given distance, all we need is the weight of the something, the energy content of the fuel per unit volume, and the distance moved. A simple spreadsheet should suffice and most of the information needed should be available from physics reference books.

  • ChuckL

    A proposed solution to the fuel economy (MPG) problem.

    It should not be too difficult to report the distance traveled based on the gallon equivalent of gasoline. Or we could use Kwh equivalents, or you pick the standard that will used to report on the energy used per unit distance.

    It seems to me that once upon a time one of my buddies calculated something in “farts per furlong”.

    Since this is just a simple calculation of energy required to move something a given distance, all we need is the weight of the something, the energy content of the fuel per unit volume, and the distance moved. A simple spreadsheet should suffice and most of the information needed should be available from physics reference books.

  • Pingback: Going the Distance: Ford Delivers First PHEV to Canada’s Largest Electricity Producer : Gas 2.0()

  • Joseph Olson

    It’s a good looking car and the production model will look even better. Ford is not a company in a hurry, putting caps on production is a cost-saving measure, making a second, third, etc. model year not only possible, but profitable. Making PHEVs profitable isn’t possible overnight, not when a top selling point is how a vehicle looks. Money is business, morality or even simple conscientiousness isn’t. Maybe if we can get people to actually buy reasonable numbers of these products, costs will go down, profits go up, our carbon footprints shrink, and our children will have air to breathe. Spend money on the right, smart things! Pay the premium because some things are more precious than money. Consumers must be the conscience of producers!

  • Joseph Olson

    It’s a good looking car and the production model will look even better. Ford is not a company in a hurry, putting caps on production is a cost-saving measure, making a second, third, etc. model year not only possible, but profitable. Making PHEVs profitable isn’t possible overnight, not when a top selling point is how a vehicle looks. Money is business, morality or even simple conscientiousness isn’t. Maybe if we can get people to actually buy reasonable numbers of these products, costs will go down, profits go up, our carbon footprints shrink, and our children will have air to breathe. Spend money on the right, smart things! Pay the premium because some things are more precious than money. Consumers must be the conscience of producers!

  • Joseph Olson

    It’s a good looking car and the production model will look even better. Ford is not a company in a hurry, putting caps on production is a cost-saving measure, making a second, third, etc. model year not only possible, but profitable. Making PHEVs profitable isn’t possible overnight, not when a top selling point is how a vehicle looks. Money is business, morality or even simple conscientiousness isn’t. Maybe if we can get people to actually buy reasonable numbers of these products, costs will go down, profits go up, our carbon footprints shrink, and our children will have air to breathe. Spend money on the right, smart things! Pay the premium because some things are more precious than money. Consumers must be the conscience of producers!

  • http://Web Steven Iverson

    Will the Oil Companies allow it to go into production? Why aren’t all cars being made this way? We could tell OPEC to stick it if all our vehicles had this type of mileage.

  • jeff

    escape hybrid plug in would have been a game changer
    now mitsubishi has the outlander PHEV and can’t keep up production.
    How could Ford flush away that success?

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