Trains no image

Published on May 13th, 2008 | by Clayton

232

California Building 220 MPH High-Speed Train from San Francisco to LA


high-speed train, CHSRA

Imagine a high-speed rail line that could get you from San Francisco to LA in 2 hours and 40 minutes.

That dream appears to be coming true, thanks to work by the California High-Speed Rail Authority. After getting a green light by State environmental impact assessors, they’ve begun implementation of an 800-mile bullet-train system that will connect Sacramento, the San Francisco Bay Area, the Central Valley, Los Angeles, the Inland Empire, Orange County and San Diego. Trains traveling at 220 mph on the systems are forecast to carry up to 100 million passengers per year by 2030.

While 2030 is a long way off, at least things are moving in the right direction. Having a high-speed rail system connecting (eventually) the length of the West coast is a good idea for a number of reasons, including greenhouse-gas emissions reductions, improving public transportation and reducing congestion, and creating half a million new jobs. While our aging standby Amtrak is still around (believe it or not) and bearable for short distances, it’s more expensive and takes twice as much time to travel the same distance when compared to driving (non-California example: 15 hours from Portland, OR to San Francisco).

The State will have a bond measure of $9.95 billion on the November 2008 ballot, which requires a simple majority vote for approval. The measure allocates $9 billion for the high-speed rail system and $950 million for improvements to other rail services that connect to the high-speed service.

For more information, see the website of the California High-Speed Rail Authority.

Posts Related to Green Transportation Technology:

This story was also reported at EcoLocalizer: A Train as Fast as a Plane: The Plan for High-Speed Rail in California Moves Forward

Photo Credit: NC3D, provided by the California High Speed Rail Authority

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About the Author

In a past life, Clayton was a professional blogger and editor of Gas 2.0, Important Media’s blog covering the future of sustainable transportation. He was also the Managing Editor for GO Media, the predecessor to Important Media.



  • http://ecoworldly.com Gavin Hudson

    Now this… I love!! Man, I have to be there for the vote in November!

  • http://ecoworldly.com Gavin Hudson

    Now this… I love!! Man, I have to be there for the vote in November!

  • Daniel

    …The west coast is more than California. Still, a good start.

  • Daniel

    …The west coast is more than California. Still, a good start.

  • e

    what the hell took so damn long?

    every metropolitan area in this country should be connected by bullet trains.

    duh.

    Japan!

    Europe!

    Trains.

  • e

    what the hell took so damn long?

    every metropolitan area in this country should be connected by bullet trains.

    duh.

    Japan!

    Europe!

    Trains.

  • Koowan

    A really, really BAD idea. Does anyone really believe that this monster will cost any less than 4 – 5 times the budget allocated for it at a time when the state is facing a 10+ billion dollar deficit? Does anyone really believe this monster will be fully utilized when there is no evidence that there is some invisible mob of people who can’t afford a plane ticket? This isn’t the east coast — rail died here for a reason — it can’t compete. Unlike airlines that can alter routes, once the rail is laid, that’s it. If population shifts, the rail line gets abandoned, just like it already has all over the west.

    Mark my words, this thing will turn out to be a multi-billion dollar fiasco of epic proportions and you will all be paying for it at the cost of less funding for education, prisons, roads and other infrastructure.

  • Koowan

    A really, really BAD idea. Does anyone really believe that this monster will cost any less than 4 – 5 times the budget allocated for it at a time when the state is facing a 10+ billion dollar deficit? Does anyone really believe this monster will be fully utilized when there is no evidence that there is some invisible mob of people who can’t afford a plane ticket? This isn’t the east coast — rail died here for a reason — it can’t compete. Unlike airlines that can alter routes, once the rail is laid, that’s it. If population shifts, the rail line gets abandoned, just like it already has all over the west.

    Mark my words, this thing will turn out to be a multi-billion dollar fiasco of epic proportions and you will all be paying for it at the cost of less funding for education, prisons, roads and other infrastructure.

  • LFR

    Nice to see this country catching up to the rest of the world with technological innovation being applied domestically instead of being implemented in a strictly military or multi-national project overseas.

    Right on the heels of Argentina’s announcement of their plans to become the home of the first high speed train in the Americas.

  • LFR

    Nice to see this country catching up to the rest of the world with technological innovation being applied domestically instead of being implemented in a strictly military or multi-national project overseas.

    Right on the heels of Argentina’s announcement of their plans to become the home of the first high speed train in the Americas.

  • ID

    If it won’t be more expensive than a plain, I am in

  • ID

    If it won’t be more expensive than a plain, I am in

  • Stephen

    Can’t wait till we implement something like this in every state. Europe’s rail systems are amazing, and the United States system sucks balls. took me 24 hours to get from Cincinnati to Washington DC, it’s ridiculous

  • Stephen

    Can’t wait till we implement something like this in every state. Europe’s rail systems are amazing, and the United States system sucks balls. took me 24 hours to get from Cincinnati to Washington DC, it’s ridiculous

  • Tubbsie Doot

    This is a totally misleading headline. There has been very little progress on this, only talk. I will believe this when I’m riding on it. These idiots should have built the thing 30 years ago, but bureaucracy and general American ambivalence have kept it from happening for decades. Kudos for talking about it, but that’s all this is for now.

  • Tubbsie Doot

    This is a totally misleading headline. There has been very little progress on this, only talk. I will believe this when I’m riding on it. These idiots should have built the thing 30 years ago, but bureaucracy and general American ambivalence have kept it from happening for decades. Kudos for talking about it, but that’s all this is for now.

  • Tubbsie Doot

    This is a totally misleading headline. There has been very little progress on this, only talk. I will believe this when I’m riding on it. These idiots should have built the thing 30 years ago, but bureaucracy and general American ambivalence have kept it from happening for decades. Kudos for talking about it, but that’s all this is for now.

  • Benny

    Surrre…. let’s see if that $10 Billion dollar figure doesn’t actually move to something like $20 Billion+ IF this thing actually happens

  • Benny

    Surrre…. let’s see if that $10 Billion dollar figure doesn’t actually move to something like $20 Billion+ IF this thing actually happens

  • http://Huh? Onion

    It’s about time, but what happens when there’s an earthquake? This needs to be implemented nationwide with a network of high speed electric trains. But, this will be crushed by the lobbyist for the airlines in Washington.

  • Fatal Claws

    Repeat after me… this will never get built.

    I drive from Ventura to Santa Barbara everyday for my job. The 101 is a complete disaster – it’s falling apart. If the state doesn’t have money to fix this vital freeway, then it sure as heck ain’t going to have billions to build this high speed rail line. Couple more years and I am moving back to Europe, where they are actually making progress for the future. America will spend billions a month on Iraq, yet the government won’t spend a dime to fix the eroding infrastructure. And by 2030, when global warming causes the Sierra snow pack to be cut in half, how will California survive? They should be starting construction of desalination plants up and down the coast _now_ not talking about bond measures to build more dams. What are they going to fill the dams with, dust? Perth Australia built a huge desal plant a couple of years ago when they realized the rainfall and underground sources of water weren’t going to be enough for their growth and they will be building another plant soon. If California tried to do this, it would be tied up in the courts for years.

  • Fatal Claws

    Repeat after me… this will never get built.

    I drive from Ventura to Santa Barbara everyday for my job. The 101 is a complete disaster – it’s falling apart. If the state doesn’t have money to fix this vital freeway, then it sure as heck ain’t going to have billions to build this high speed rail line. Couple more years and I am moving back to Europe, where they are actually making progress for the future. America will spend billions a month on Iraq, yet the government won’t spend a dime to fix the eroding infrastructure. And by 2030, when global warming causes the Sierra snow pack to be cut in half, how will California survive? They should be starting construction of desalination plants up and down the coast _now_ not talking about bond measures to build more dams. What are they going to fill the dams with, dust? Perth Australia built a huge desal plant a couple of years ago when they realized the rainfall and underground sources of water weren’t going to be enough for their growth and they will be building another plant soon. If California tried to do this, it would be tied up in the courts for years.

  • http://aaronstewart.blogspot.com Aaron

    @stephen, could not agree with you more.

  • http://aaronstewart.blogspot.com Aaron

    @stephen, could not agree with you more.

  • http://aaronstewart.blogspot.com Aaron

    @stephen, could not agree with you more.

  • John

    umm… who said it had anything to do w/ the west coast?????

    The whole entire article is about CA and being able to travel faster around it. So wtf are you talking about???

  • John

    umm… who said it had anything to do w/ the west coast?????

    The whole entire article is about CA and being able to travel faster around it. So wtf are you talking about???

  • John

    umm… who said it had anything to do w/ the west coast?????

    The whole entire article is about CA and being able to travel faster around it. So wtf are you talking about???

  • John C. Randolph

    Oh, for crying out loud. What the hell is it with politicians that they keep thinking that *this* time, they can build a passenger rail project that will succeed?

    There’s no shortage of transportation provided by the private sector. If high-speed rail is viable in the market, let it be built with private funds.

    -jcr

    • http://Web Kevin

      Did private funds build the hoover dam? Did private funds build the highway system? Did private funds build the transcontinental railroad?

  • John C. Randolph

    Oh, for crying out loud. What the hell is it with politicians that they keep thinking that *this* time, they can build a passenger rail project that will succeed?

    There’s no shortage of transportation provided by the private sector. If high-speed rail is viable in the market, let it be built with private funds.

    -jcr

  • John C. Randolph

    Oh, for crying out loud. What the hell is it with politicians that they keep thinking that *this* time, they can build a passenger rail project that will succeed?

    There’s no shortage of transportation provided by the private sector. If high-speed rail is viable in the market, let it be built with private funds.

    -jcr

  • Uncle B

    Cynics! OPEC is going to pry the last of the fat asses out of SUV’s, we all know they won’t walk, and they will still have to get around. Combine this idea with huge rental outfits for battery cars at the train stations, and you have the makings of a warmer, kinder, less pressured America. A nice clean place to live! We could even have dining rooms and news stands at the stations!

  • Uncle B

    Cynics! OPEC is going to pry the last of the fat asses out of SUV’s, we all know they won’t walk, and they will still have to get around. Combine this idea with huge rental outfits for battery cars at the train stations, and you have the makings of a warmer, kinder, less pressured America. A nice clean place to live! We could even have dining rooms and news stands at the stations!

  • Uncle B

    Cynics! OPEC is going to pry the last of the fat asses out of SUV’s, we all know they won’t walk, and they will still have to get around. Combine this idea with huge rental outfits for battery cars at the train stations, and you have the makings of a warmer, kinder, less pressured America. A nice clean place to live! We could even have dining rooms and news stands at the stations!

  • krob

    This is going to be so cool. No more fucking Air Plane trips to places not so far. No more gas! w00t! i want public transportation to get better. What is important to know is how many lanes they plan on building. The more lanes, the cheaper transportation will be by volume, which will pay for itself, but the question is will there be enough resources at the destination points in order to pick people up, take them to their destinations once they have arrived. Each destination needs public transportation. They will have to tackle this as a plane alternative. and jets are not fun to take, long waits, uncomfortable flights, and no cellphones.

  • krob

    This is going to be so cool. No more fucking Air Plane trips to places not so far. No more gas! w00t! i want public transportation to get better. What is important to know is how many lanes they plan on building. The more lanes, the cheaper transportation will be by volume, which will pay for itself, but the question is will there be enough resources at the destination points in order to pick people up, take them to their destinations once they have arrived. Each destination needs public transportation. They will have to tackle this as a plane alternative. and jets are not fun to take, long waits, uncomfortable flights, and no cellphones.

  • krob

    This is going to be so cool. No more fucking Air Plane trips to places not so far. No more gas! w00t! i want public transportation to get better. What is important to know is how many lanes they plan on building. The more lanes, the cheaper transportation will be by volume, which will pay for itself, but the question is will there be enough resources at the destination points in order to pick people up, take them to their destinations once they have arrived. Each destination needs public transportation. They will have to tackle this as a plane alternative. and jets are not fun to take, long waits, uncomfortable flights, and no cellphones.

  • James

    This is a great idea, you’d have to be an idiot not to see that. Fact 1 in 8 americans reside in california. To expect greener solutions in California without creating a rapid mass transit for the people is insane. While the cost’s could go higher I doubt that they would. The only reason for cost’s to go up would be if prices for steel and other metals continue to rise, all the more reason to get a jump on this now. Then when you factor in the price for fuel for Jet’s and the struggling economy of Airline travel and the wait times for Planes and security checks you end up taking just as long to travel from the bay area to L.A.. Now a better question would be why not take the existing Amtrak lines tracks and convert them to the bullet train style, thereby using an existing area instead of having to find land and rezoning. Meanwhile they can run the line up into Oregon and Washington and hopefully split the expense. Also we need to set up multiple tracks to have at least 4 trains running at any time. If we implemented this kind of transit model, the people would take it. A 1.5 hour trip would beat an airline any day.

  • James

    This is a great idea, you’d have to be an idiot not to see that. Fact 1 in 8 americans reside in california. To expect greener solutions in California without creating a rapid mass transit for the people is insane. While the cost’s could go higher I doubt that they would. The only reason for cost’s to go up would be if prices for steel and other metals continue to rise, all the more reason to get a jump on this now. Then when you factor in the price for fuel for Jet’s and the struggling economy of Airline travel and the wait times for Planes and security checks you end up taking just as long to travel from the bay area to L.A.. Now a better question would be why not take the existing Amtrak lines tracks and convert them to the bullet train style, thereby using an existing area instead of having to find land and rezoning. Meanwhile they can run the line up into Oregon and Washington and hopefully split the expense. Also we need to set up multiple tracks to have at least 4 trains running at any time. If we implemented this kind of transit model, the people would take it. A 1.5 hour trip would beat an airline any day.

  • James

    This is a great idea, you’d have to be an idiot not to see that. Fact 1 in 8 americans reside in california. To expect greener solutions in California without creating a rapid mass transit for the people is insane. While the cost’s could go higher I doubt that they would. The only reason for cost’s to go up would be if prices for steel and other metals continue to rise, all the more reason to get a jump on this now. Then when you factor in the price for fuel for Jet’s and the struggling economy of Airline travel and the wait times for Planes and security checks you end up taking just as long to travel from the bay area to L.A.. Now a better question would be why not take the existing Amtrak lines tracks and convert them to the bullet train style, thereby using an existing area instead of having to find land and rezoning. Meanwhile they can run the line up into Oregon and Washington and hopefully split the expense. Also we need to set up multiple tracks to have at least 4 trains running at any time. If we implemented this kind of transit model, the people would take it. A 1.5 hour trip would beat an airline any day.

  • Scott

    Public transportation is no panacea. While 220mph from SF to LA is “fast” we already have planes that take you there at 500mph. But there’s still 2-3 hours queing delay on each end for security, ticketing, scheduling, and baggage claim. Why would it be any different for a packed bullet train?

    Your 440 mile journey wouldn’t be over in two hours, it would take four. Oh, and you’d have to arrange for a car at the far end to get where you are going. Taxi? Sure if you’re traveling on business or the taxpayer’s dime. But people who pay their own way know that cab fare one way is equivalent to a full-day rental.

    I could make the same 440 mile journey in four hours if they’d raise the speed limits on the interstate to a reasonable 110mph and enforce lane discipline rather than punish people for driving 10mph over the speed of traffic.

    And seriously, that’s not much of a change. CA interstates COMMONLY move at 80-90mph already, forget what the law allows.

  • Scott

    Public transportation is no panacea. While 220mph from SF to LA is “fast” we already have planes that take you there at 500mph. But there’s still 2-3 hours queing delay on each end for security, ticketing, scheduling, and baggage claim. Why would it be any different for a packed bullet train?

    Your 440 mile journey wouldn’t be over in two hours, it would take four. Oh, and you’d have to arrange for a car at the far end to get where you are going. Taxi? Sure if you’re traveling on business or the taxpayer’s dime. But people who pay their own way know that cab fare one way is equivalent to a full-day rental.

    I could make the same 440 mile journey in four hours if they’d raise the speed limits on the interstate to a reasonable 110mph and enforce lane discipline rather than punish people for driving 10mph over the speed of traffic.

    And seriously, that’s not much of a change. CA interstates COMMONLY move at 80-90mph already, forget what the law allows.

  • Scott

    Public transportation is no panacea. While 220mph from SF to LA is “fast” we already have planes that take you there at 500mph. But there’s still 2-3 hours queing delay on each end for security, ticketing, scheduling, and baggage claim. Why would it be any different for a packed bullet train?

    Your 440 mile journey wouldn’t be over in two hours, it would take four. Oh, and you’d have to arrange for a car at the far end to get where you are going. Taxi? Sure if you’re traveling on business or the taxpayer’s dime. But people who pay their own way know that cab fare one way is equivalent to a full-day rental.

    I could make the same 440 mile journey in four hours if they’d raise the speed limits on the interstate to a reasonable 110mph and enforce lane discipline rather than punish people for driving 10mph over the speed of traffic.

    And seriously, that’s not much of a change. CA interstates COMMONLY move at 80-90mph already, forget what the law allows.

  • johnny

    I sure hope this gets built, and eventually connects all along the coast. I love taking the train home from uni instead of driving, but it takes much longer. A high speed alternative to air travel is wonderful, rail is so much more fuel efficient and environmentally friendly, both of which are what we desperately need in this country.

  • johnny

    I sure hope this gets built, and eventually connects all along the coast. I love taking the train home from uni instead of driving, but it takes much longer. A high speed alternative to air travel is wonderful, rail is so much more fuel efficient and environmentally friendly, both of which are what we desperately need in this country.

  • johnny

    I sure hope this gets built, and eventually connects all along the coast. I love taking the train home from uni instead of driving, but it takes much longer. A high speed alternative to air travel is wonderful, rail is so much more fuel efficient and environmentally friendly, both of which are what we desperately need in this country.

  • ryan

    2030?…a bunch of chinese immigrants with funny hats built the transcontinental railroad faster than that using pickaxes and a healthy disregard for personal safety.

  • ryan

    2030?…a bunch of chinese immigrants with funny hats built the transcontinental railroad faster than that using pickaxes and a healthy disregard for personal safety.

  • ryan

    2030?…a bunch of chinese immigrants with funny hats built the transcontinental railroad faster than that using pickaxes and a healthy disregard for personal safety.

  • chris d

    Great, spending more money California doesn’t have — a brilliant idea.

  • chris d

    Great, spending more money California doesn’t have — a brilliant idea.

  • Dennis Scott

    Koowan – rail died on the East Coast for a reason indeed – the auto and oil lobbies killed it. Most cities and towns here had trolley and train service, until oil companies literally bought the tracks and tore them up, all so they could sell more cars, tires and gas. Learn a little history before blowing off about something you don’t understand.

  • Dennis Scott

    Koowan – rail died on the East Coast for a reason indeed – the auto and oil lobbies killed it. Most cities and towns here had trolley and train service, until oil companies literally bought the tracks and tore them up, all so they could sell more cars, tires and gas. Learn a little history before blowing off about something you don’t understand.

  • Dennis Scott

    Koowan – rail died on the East Coast for a reason indeed – the auto and oil lobbies killed it. Most cities and towns here had trolley and train service, until oil companies literally bought the tracks and tore them up, all so they could sell more cars, tires and gas. Learn a little history before blowing off about something you don’t understand.

  • Hudu

    @James

    Amtrak owns very little of the track they use in Ca. Most of it is UP track they have rights to run on, which is why the Coast Starlight is constantly having to pull over and let freight trains through. Building their own ROW will not only allow for true high speed runs (unlike the NE Corridor) but will allow local Amtrak trains to run at much higher speed and with fewer interruptions.

  • Hudu

    @James

    Amtrak owns very little of the track they use in Ca. Most of it is UP track they have rights to run on, which is why the Coast Starlight is constantly having to pull over and let freight trains through. Building their own ROW will not only allow for true high speed runs (unlike the NE Corridor) but will allow local Amtrak trains to run at much higher speed and with fewer interruptions.

  • Adelphi

    I am wondering why we have waited so long to come up with such a simple solution ? ( may be gas at $ 8 per gallon and oil reaching $ 200 will develop our inventiveness ) .The European TGV ( high speed 200mph train: train a grande vitesse ) already links Paris to Brussels or London in less than 2 hours It makes more sense now to travel by rail from the center of London to center of Paris to avoid the trouble of airport transportation .Ok I understand everybody has to make a living : the oil companies , car makers , the tire industry etc..)

  • Adelphi

    I am wondering why we have waited so long to come up with such a simple solution ? ( may be gas at $ 8 per gallon and oil reaching $ 200 will develop our inventiveness ) .The European TGV ( high speed 200mph train: train a grande vitesse ) already links Paris to Brussels or London in less than 2 hours It makes more sense now to travel by rail from the center of London to center of Paris to avoid the trouble of airport transportation .Ok I understand everybody has to make a living : the oil companies , car makers , the tire industry etc..)

  • Meany

    Don’t worry people! Almost all government projects are completed on time, and wayyy under budget!!!

    /sarcasm

  • Meany

    Don’t worry people! Almost all government projects are completed on time, and wayyy under budget!!!

    /sarcasm

  • Meany

    Don’t worry people! Almost all government projects are completed on time, and wayyy under budget!!!

    /sarcasm

  • Obama Bin Laden

    Its a bleedin’ train so what?

    Hornby have been buildin’ em for years

    Imagine the nightmarish scenes when this baby hits a redneck in pickup.

  • Obama Bin Laden

    Its a bleedin’ train so what?

    Hornby have been buildin’ em for years

    Imagine the nightmarish scenes when this baby hits a redneck in pickup.

  • Lew G

    When is the last time any gov did anything that worked? Amtrak, for instance? The FAA’s airports, for instance. The Space Shuttle, any war you want to name, …

    The FDA? Kills us by the 100s of 1000s every year due to expensive medicines, preventing European medicines from competing with US manufacturers, and so very few new medicines.

    Economies controlled by govs don’t work. They all crash, sooner or later of an overdose of national debt.

    The bigger and more intrusive the gov, the slower the economic growth rate, across all times and styles of govs.

    Already, in the US, we don’t generate enough jobs for young people.

    A bullet train won’t help any of that, just makes it worse.

    Lew

  • Lew G

    When is the last time any gov did anything that worked? Amtrak, for instance? The FAA’s airports, for instance. The Space Shuttle, any war you want to name, …

    The FDA? Kills us by the 100s of 1000s every year due to expensive medicines, preventing European medicines from competing with US manufacturers, and so very few new medicines.

    Economies controlled by govs don’t work. They all crash, sooner or later of an overdose of national debt.

    The bigger and more intrusive the gov, the slower the economic growth rate, across all times and styles of govs.

    Already, in the US, we don’t generate enough jobs for young people.

    A bullet train won’t help any of that, just makes it worse.

    Lew

  • Lew G

    When is the last time any gov did anything that worked? Amtrak, for instance? The FAA’s airports, for instance. The Space Shuttle, any war you want to name, …

    The FDA? Kills us by the 100s of 1000s every year due to expensive medicines, preventing European medicines from competing with US manufacturers, and so very few new medicines.

    Economies controlled by govs don’t work. They all crash, sooner or later of an overdose of national debt.

    The bigger and more intrusive the gov, the slower the economic growth rate, across all times and styles of govs.

    Already, in the US, we don’t generate enough jobs for young people.

    A bullet train won’t help any of that, just makes it worse.

    Lew

  • http://www.informednetworker.com/ David Mackey

    Sweet.

  • http://www.informednetworker.com/ David Mackey

    Sweet.

  • Kevin

    On the east coast business travelers prefer the Acela over commuter flights for a lot of reasons, price is not one of them.

    1) Less hassle at the station, you don’t have to show up at the station that early, less time dealing with security/check in

    2) More roomy/get up and walk around/plug in your laptop/use a cell phone = get more work done

    3) They do not seem to get as delayed, under booked commuter flights magically get pushed back due to “weather” on sunny days, has happened multiple times on a DC to Boston flight that I know of

    Generally it takes less time by train than airplane once you factor in the airport at either end.

    Plus it is safer & better for the environment.

    Although I have to think that it would be better done by private companies, they can recoup the money so long as they are only doing select lines and I bet they would get it done sooner than 2030. The passenger trains got crushed by all the legacy routes they had when planes came along and the trains were mostly empty, they can compete on the busy lines.

  • Kevin

    On the east coast business travelers prefer the Acela over commuter flights for a lot of reasons, price is not one of them.

    1) Less hassle at the station, you don’t have to show up at the station that early, less time dealing with security/check in

    2) More roomy/get up and walk around/plug in your laptop/use a cell phone = get more work done

    3) They do not seem to get as delayed, under booked commuter flights magically get pushed back due to “weather” on sunny days, has happened multiple times on a DC to Boston flight that I know of

    Generally it takes less time by train than airplane once you factor in the airport at either end.

    Plus it is safer & better for the environment.

    Although I have to think that it would be better done by private companies, they can recoup the money so long as they are only doing select lines and I bet they would get it done sooner than 2030. The passenger trains got crushed by all the legacy routes they had when planes came along and the trains were mostly empty, they can compete on the busy lines.

  • Kevin

    On the east coast business travelers prefer the Acela over commuter flights for a lot of reasons, price is not one of them.

    1) Less hassle at the station, you don’t have to show up at the station that early, less time dealing with security/check in

    2) More roomy/get up and walk around/plug in your laptop/use a cell phone = get more work done

    3) They do not seem to get as delayed, under booked commuter flights magically get pushed back due to “weather” on sunny days, has happened multiple times on a DC to Boston flight that I know of

    Generally it takes less time by train than airplane once you factor in the airport at either end.

    Plus it is safer & better for the environment.

    Although I have to think that it would be better done by private companies, they can recoup the money so long as they are only doing select lines and I bet they would get it done sooner than 2030. The passenger trains got crushed by all the legacy routes they had when planes came along and the trains were mostly empty, they can compete on the busy lines.

  • Huh?

    >ID said on May 14th, 2008 at 7:04 pm

    >If it won’t be more expensive than a plain, I am in

    More expensive than a plain what?

  • Huh?

    >ID said on May 14th, 2008 at 7:04 pm

    >If it won’t be more expensive than a plain, I am in

    More expensive than a plain what?

  • Chem

    We should have trains coast to coast. For the cost of the misadventure in Iraq we could have been there.

  • Chem

    We should have trains coast to coast. For the cost of the misadventure in Iraq we could have been there.

  • Chem

    We should have trains coast to coast. For the cost of the misadventure in Iraq we could have been there.

  • rcorrino

    @Koowan

    You probably don’t know the history of the rail system in the Bay Area/California in general. The rail system was flourishing here until the car, gas and rubber (ie tire) conglomerates bought up the aging rail system and dismantled it; thus began the car culture in California. Dig up any major street in San Francisco and you’ll see remnants of railroad tracks. If it was at least maintained an updated, we would have had this “bullet train” long before Japan did. The airlines did not kill the rail system, it was dead long before air travel bacame mainstream.

    Of course it would be profitable. A lot of people are still afraid of flying. Besides, with all the TSA restrictions and the sardine can they call coach these days, I’m sure these trains will be more comfortable.

    Forget the cost. Californians overspend on other stuff anyway. Anybody living in the Bay area knows about the “Bay Bridge Saga”. Might as well spend the money on “crap” something that will eventually benefit the entire state.

    @Daniel

    Yes, the west coast is not just California but this would be as good a place for this to start as any :).

  • rcorrino

    @Koowan

    You probably don’t know the history of the rail system in the Bay Area/California in general. The rail system was flourishing here until the car, gas and rubber (ie tire) conglomerates bought up the aging rail system and dismantled it; thus began the car culture in California. Dig up any major street in San Francisco and you’ll see remnants of railroad tracks. If it was at least maintained an updated, we would have had this “bullet train” long before Japan did. The airlines did not kill the rail system, it was dead long before air travel bacame mainstream.

    Of course it would be profitable. A lot of people are still afraid of flying. Besides, with all the TSA restrictions and the sardine can they call coach these days, I’m sure these trains will be more comfortable.

    Forget the cost. Californians overspend on other stuff anyway. Anybody living in the Bay area knows about the “Bay Bridge Saga”. Might as well spend the money on “crap” something that will eventually benefit the entire state.

    @Daniel

    Yes, the west coast is not just California but this would be as good a place for this to start as any :).

  • http://www.stationstops.com stationstops

    How about this: imagine commercial jet service which could fly between LA and San Francisco in less than half the time?

    I totally don’t understand the financial rationale of this project.

  • http://www.stationstops.com stationstops

    How about this: imagine commercial jet service which could fly between LA and San Francisco in less than half the time?

    I totally don’t understand the financial rationale of this project.

  • http://www.stationstops.com stationstops

    How about this: imagine commercial jet service which could fly between LA and San Francisco in less than half the time?

    I totally don’t understand the financial rationale of this project.

  • Javier

    2030!? Are you kidding me? Japan has had this trains since 1964!!!

  • Javier

    2030!? Are you kidding me? Japan has had this trains since 1964!!!

  • Javier

    2030!? Are you kidding me? Japan has had this trains since 1964!!!

  • Cervus

    Those of you thinking “why haven’t we done this sooner?” and wonder why Japan and Europe has this and we don’t, I have two words for you:

    Population density.

    Japan has about 5x our population packed into about the same land area. Europe is also much more densely packed.

    Why can’t private industry foot the bill? Why bother me with my tax dollars to build this thing, when the state can’t even afford its education budget? It’s not just the construction costs. The track will cost money to maintain. If it’s a profitable venture, then private investors will flock to it. Otherwise, it’s just another government boondoggle that will end up costing more than Boston’s Big Dig.

  • Cervus

    Those of you thinking “why haven’t we done this sooner?” and wonder why Japan and Europe has this and we don’t, I have two words for you:

    Population density.

    Japan has about 5x our population packed into about the same land area. Europe is also much more densely packed.

    Why can’t private industry foot the bill? Why bother me with my tax dollars to build this thing, when the state can’t even afford its education budget? It’s not just the construction costs. The track will cost money to maintain. If it’s a profitable venture, then private investors will flock to it. Otherwise, it’s just another government boondoggle that will end up costing more than Boston’s Big Dig.

  • Cervus

    Those of you thinking “why haven’t we done this sooner?” and wonder why Japan and Europe has this and we don’t, I have two words for you:

    Population density.

    Japan has about 5x our population packed into about the same land area. Europe is also much more densely packed.

    Why can’t private industry foot the bill? Why bother me with my tax dollars to build this thing, when the state can’t even afford its education budget? It’s not just the construction costs. The track will cost money to maintain. If it’s a profitable venture, then private investors will flock to it. Otherwise, it’s just another government boondoggle that will end up costing more than Boston’s Big Dig.

  • Pingback: Thursdays Insanity « Madnessletters

  • JD

    One word:

    Earthquake.

  • JD

    One word:

    Earthquake.

  • iiiears

    This would be great! Short flights save only an an hour or two longer than driving when you add the time preflight.

    Somrthing like this was talked about between Las Vegas and Los angeles a few years ago. This seems to be slightly more sustainable. I think.

    This will certainly cost 2 – 10x the estimate (Government math) Remember the optimism of people writing the study. The government tendency to turn this into a giant subsidy for Freight rail is obvious but, considering rail is “greener” it still might be advantageous. Though 90b Dollars would be fairly close to the annual budget amount.

    America used to invest in impressive infrastructure technology.

  • iiiears

    This would be great! Short flights save only an an hour or two longer than driving when you add the time preflight.

    Somrthing like this was talked about between Las Vegas and Los angeles a few years ago. This seems to be slightly more sustainable. I think.

    This will certainly cost 2 – 10x the estimate (Government math) Remember the optimism of people writing the study. The government tendency to turn this into a giant subsidy for Freight rail is obvious but, considering rail is “greener” it still might be advantageous. Though 90b Dollars would be fairly close to the annual budget amount.

    America used to invest in impressive infrastructure technology.

  • iiiears

    This would be great! Short flights save only an an hour or two longer than driving when you add the time preflight.

    Somrthing like this was talked about between Las Vegas and Los angeles a few years ago. This seems to be slightly more sustainable. I think.

    This will certainly cost 2 – 10x the estimate (Government math) Remember the optimism of people writing the study. The government tendency to turn this into a giant subsidy for Freight rail is obvious but, considering rail is “greener” it still might be advantageous. Though 90b Dollars would be fairly close to the annual budget amount.

    America used to invest in impressive infrastructure technology.

  • eatingorange

    @koowan I seriously doubt the populations of LA and San Francisco will “shift” any time soon. This should have been built in the ’80s!

  • eatingorange

    @koowan I seriously doubt the populations of LA and San Francisco will “shift” any time soon. This should have been built in the ’80s!

  • Will

    Good, anyone who thinks this is going to go way south or cost way to much is flat our wrong. This will most likely be managed by a foreign company with lots of experience. Trains are 100+ years old this isn’t rocket science.

  • Will

    Good, anyone who thinks this is going to go way south or cost way to much is flat our wrong. This will most likely be managed by a foreign company with lots of experience. Trains are 100+ years old this isn’t rocket science.

  • Will

    Good, anyone who thinks this is going to go way south or cost way to much is flat our wrong. This will most likely be managed by a foreign company with lots of experience. Trains are 100+ years old this isn’t rocket science.

  • http://www.various-thoughts.com Charles Lumia

    That is a terrific idea! Hopefully everything works out and there aren’t any project ending complications.

    Also, why can’t we get something like this in the Northeast? It’s the most populous area in the United States. Connect New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia, D.C. and Boston. That would be absolutely amazing and I don’t see how it could cost much more than this, if all of those states contributed it could be done so easily.

  • http://www.various-thoughts.com Charles Lumia

    That is a terrific idea! Hopefully everything works out and there aren’t any project ending complications.

    Also, why can’t we get something like this in the Northeast? It’s the most populous area in the United States. Connect New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia, D.C. and Boston. That would be absolutely amazing and I don’t see how it could cost much more than this, if all of those states contributed it could be done so easily.

  • where

    So where are they going to put it?

    A. Are they going to try to buy out the freight companies, and replace old track? Good luck with that. Freight companies won’t even let passenger trains have right-of-way over empty freight cars today. I can’t imagine they’d let you tear up their tracks, even if you were going to put down faster ones that they could use.

    B. Or are they going to use Imminent Domain and steal privately-owned land to build it on? That’s going to be popular. Also when you take into account how many people across 400 miles might challenge you in court, this might not even be cheaper than option A.

    C. Um, maybe you could tear up the interstate? Not a lot of options left…

    A big reason we don’t have high-speed rail being laid down everywhere is because you can’t exactly go to a real estate agent and say “hi, I’d like to buy a piece of land 600 km long and 10 meters wide, what have you got?”. It works for the Japanese because with their population density, it’s required, and they know it, and they also have a culture of submitting to authority. People in LA would never put up with half the things they have on Tokyo trains, e.g., uniformed people whose job is to shove as many people as possible onto a train.

  • where

    So where are they going to put it?

    A. Are they going to try to buy out the freight companies, and replace old track? Good luck with that. Freight companies won’t even let passenger trains have right-of-way over empty freight cars today. I can’t imagine they’d let you tear up their tracks, even if you were going to put down faster ones that they could use.

    B. Or are they going to use Imminent Domain and steal privately-owned land to build it on? That’s going to be popular. Also when you take into account how many people across 400 miles might challenge you in court, this might not even be cheaper than option A.

    C. Um, maybe you could tear up the interstate? Not a lot of options left…

    A big reason we don’t have high-speed rail being laid down everywhere is because you can’t exactly go to a real estate agent and say “hi, I’d like to buy a piece of land 600 km long and 10 meters wide, what have you got?”. It works for the Japanese because with their population density, it’s required, and they know it, and they also have a culture of submitting to authority. People in LA would never put up with half the things they have on Tokyo trains, e.g., uniformed people whose job is to shove as many people as possible onto a train.

  • where

    So where are they going to put it?

    A. Are they going to try to buy out the freight companies, and replace old track? Good luck with that. Freight companies won’t even let passenger trains have right-of-way over empty freight cars today. I can’t imagine they’d let you tear up their tracks, even if you were going to put down faster ones that they could use.

    B. Or are they going to use Imminent Domain and steal privately-owned land to build it on? That’s going to be popular. Also when you take into account how many people across 400 miles might challenge you in court, this might not even be cheaper than option A.

    C. Um, maybe you could tear up the interstate? Not a lot of options left…

    A big reason we don’t have high-speed rail being laid down everywhere is because you can’t exactly go to a real estate agent and say “hi, I’d like to buy a piece of land 600 km long and 10 meters wide, what have you got?”. It works for the Japanese because with their population density, it’s required, and they know it, and they also have a culture of submitting to authority. People in LA would never put up with half the things they have on Tokyo trains, e.g., uniformed people whose job is to shove as many people as possible onto a train.

  • duhman

    With the amount of money we are spending on wars, we could build many of these bullet trains!

  • duhman

    With the amount of money we are spending on wars, we could build many of these bullet trains!

  • duhman

    With the amount of money we are spending on wars, we could build many of these bullet trains!

  • Martin

    @cervus

    > If it’s a profitable venture, then private investors will flock to it.

    It will be a profitable venture once you Americans get to pay “real” gas prices with “real” taxation – Europeans regulary play 8,80 USD for a gallon of gas.

    This funds partially go to infrastructure development – for example the high-speed train network. In fact, for most metropolitan connections, using the more enviromental friendly german ICE is faster and cheaper than using the car. Both sides win.

  • Martin

    @cervus

    > If it’s a profitable venture, then private investors will flock to it.

    It will be a profitable venture once you Americans get to pay “real” gas prices with “real” taxation – Europeans regulary play 8,80 USD for a gallon of gas.

    This funds partially go to infrastructure development – for example the high-speed train network. In fact, for most metropolitan connections, using the more enviromental friendly german ICE is faster and cheaper than using the car. Both sides win.

  • Martin

    @cervus

    > If it’s a profitable venture, then private investors will flock to it.

    It will be a profitable venture once you Americans get to pay “real” gas prices with “real” taxation – Europeans regulary play 8,80 USD for a gallon of gas.

    This funds partially go to infrastructure development – for example the high-speed train network. In fact, for most metropolitan connections, using the more enviromental friendly german ICE is faster and cheaper than using the car. Both sides win.

  • Rich

    Trains in France and other parts of Europe have been doing this for over 20 years, in japan you can get even faster trains, (not quite as old) but by 2030 – compleation time – this technology will be obsolete, if you want a green, high tech, fast train system there is really only maglev! Thants what the chinese are using in several new projects, but then again the US economy can’t really afford that at the moment!

  • Rich

    Trains in France and other parts of Europe have been doing this for over 20 years, in japan you can get even faster trains, (not quite as old) but by 2030 – compleation time – this technology will be obsolete, if you want a green, high tech, fast train system there is really only maglev! Thants what the chinese are using in several new projects, but then again the US economy can’t really afford that at the moment!

  • Rich

    Trains in France and other parts of Europe have been doing this for over 20 years, in japan you can get even faster trains, (not quite as old) but by 2030 – compleation time – this technology will be obsolete, if you want a green, high tech, fast train system there is really only maglev! Thants what the chinese are using in several new projects, but then again the US economy can’t really afford that at the moment!

  • http://www.guruscotty.com scott anderson

    Wsih Texas could get some high-speed rail connections. Actually, the whole of America for that matter. Even if they could connect DFW with Denver without having to go through Chicago – that’d be an improvement.

    Especially in light of recent gas price jumps.

    I wish California much luck!

  • http://www.guruscotty.com scott anderson

    Wsih Texas could get some high-speed rail connections. Actually, the whole of America for that matter. Even if they could connect DFW with Denver without having to go through Chicago – that’d be an improvement.

    Especially in light of recent gas price jumps.

    I wish California much luck!

  • http://www.guruscotty.com scott anderson

    Wsih Texas could get some high-speed rail connections. Actually, the whole of America for that matter. Even if they could connect DFW with Denver without having to go through Chicago – that’d be an improvement.

    Especially in light of recent gas price jumps.

    I wish California much luck!

  • GoodLuckWithThat

    From the FAQ on the California High Speed Rail Authority website.

    “The cost to build the 800-mile system is estimated to be about $40 billion.”

    AHAHAHA

  • GoodLuckWithThat

    From the FAQ on the California High Speed Rail Authority website.

    “The cost to build the 800-mile system is estimated to be about $40 billion.”

    AHAHAHA

  • http://www.zazzle.com/TenorTzar/product/235964542142328468 Tenorlord

    This won’t be helpful until you can take your smart car along. No one wants to go to another city and be limited to cabs and “Shank’s mare”. A smart car is short enough to drive on and off a railroad car sideways.

  • http://www.zazzle.com/TenorTzar/product/235964542142328468 Tenorlord

    This won’t be helpful until you can take your smart car along. No one wants to go to another city and be limited to cabs and “Shank’s mare”. A smart car is short enough to drive on and off a railroad car sideways.

  • http://www.zazzle.com/TenorTzar/product/235964542142328468 Tenorlord

    This won’t be helpful until you can take your smart car along. No one wants to go to another city and be limited to cabs and “Shank’s mare”. A smart car is short enough to drive on and off a railroad car sideways.

  • Ren

    Does anyone really believe this will reduce emissions at an even measurable amount ? I can tell you now, this thing will not be cost effective EVER. It’s a prestige project with no prestige since they’re 30 years behind Japan and Europe.

  • Ren

    Does anyone really believe this will reduce emissions at an even measurable amount ? I can tell you now, this thing will not be cost effective EVER. It’s a prestige project with no prestige since they’re 30 years behind Japan and Europe.

  • creativename

    Finally! The airport from SF to LA insists that you take a train (BART) anyway. It’s would be much more convenient! I’m just sad it isn’t going to be completed sooner!

  • creativename

    Finally! The airport from SF to LA insists that you take a train (BART) anyway. It’s would be much more convenient! I’m just sad it isn’t going to be completed sooner!

  • creativename

    Finally! The airport from SF to LA insists that you take a train (BART) anyway. It’s would be much more convenient! I’m just sad it isn’t going to be completed sooner!

  • John Becich

    Yes Yes Yes. (But at what cost?)

    There are over 30 million people in California, and most of them move around via automobile… the gasoline costs of which are subsidized by the federal defense budget. If gasoline and jet fuel were taxed in accordance with their true costs, people would be more enamored with rail and bus services. And the monstrous federal deficits we are leaving to the (disenfranchised) next generation would be less daunting.

    Koowan, can you be serious in your allegation that the population centers served by such a train might evaporate, like “Gold Gulch,” etc.?

  • John Becich

    Yes Yes Yes. (But at what cost?)

    There are over 30 million people in California, and most of them move around via automobile… the gasoline costs of which are subsidized by the federal defense budget. If gasoline and jet fuel were taxed in accordance with their true costs, people would be more enamored with rail and bus services. And the monstrous federal deficits we are leaving to the (disenfranchised) next generation would be less daunting.

    Koowan, can you be serious in your allegation that the population centers served by such a train might evaporate, like “Gold Gulch,” etc.?

  • John Becich

    Yes Yes Yes. (But at what cost?)

    There are over 30 million people in California, and most of them move around via automobile… the gasoline costs of which are subsidized by the federal defense budget. If gasoline and jet fuel were taxed in accordance with their true costs, people would be more enamored with rail and bus services. And the monstrous federal deficits we are leaving to the (disenfranchised) next generation would be less daunting.

    Koowan, can you be serious in your allegation that the population centers served by such a train might evaporate, like “Gold Gulch,” etc.?

  • Justin

    the Anaheim to SF portion will be open by 2020. Extensions to SAC and San Diego will open later and be partially paid for by the profits of the first phase.

  • Justin

    the Anaheim to SF portion will be open by 2020. Extensions to SAC and San Diego will open later and be partially paid for by the profits of the first phase.

  • Justin

    the Anaheim to SF portion will be open by 2020. Extensions to SAC and San Diego will open later and be partially paid for by the profits of the first phase.

  • TuTu

    Koowan says – “A really, really BAD idea”

    What is your IQ? Rail competes PROFITABLY with airlines at anything less than 350 miles. The only BAD idea is not having done this 30 years ago.

  • TuTu

    Koowan says – “A really, really BAD idea”

    What is your IQ? Rail competes PROFITABLY with airlines at anything less than 350 miles. The only BAD idea is not having done this 30 years ago.

  • TuTu

    Koowan says – “A really, really BAD idea”

    What is your IQ? Rail competes PROFITABLY with airlines at anything less than 350 miles. The only BAD idea is not having done this 30 years ago.

  • http://cheatbuzz.com/ sleepyjjk

    One thing to note is that they haven’t actually started building it yet. California’s residents need to vote on this issue in November in order to get this thing started.

    So, if you are a Californian citizen like me, please vote yes this coming November. And inform other people about it too.

  • http://cheatbuzz.com/ sleepyjjk

    One thing to note is that they haven’t actually started building it yet. California’s residents need to vote on this issue in November in order to get this thing started.

    So, if you are a Californian citizen like me, please vote yes this coming November. And inform other people about it too.

  • http://cheatbuzz.com/ sleepyjjk

    One thing to note is that they haven’t actually started building it yet. California’s residents need to vote on this issue in November in order to get this thing started.

    So, if you are a Californian citizen like me, please vote yes this coming November. And inform other people about it too.

  • http://blog.badtux.net Badtux

    GOod for them. Rail here in Northern California is very popular. Peak hour Caltrain is standing room only as is BART and the VTA light rail and the Muni light rail. Private passenger trains can’t compete with highway transportation because roads are subsidized by taxes, unlike railroads, so it makes sense to subsidize passenger rail with tax money too so that they can compete on an even basis. And unfortunately, our experience here in Northern California (and Amtrak’s experience nationwide) is that the actual rails to be owned by the public because the freight lines won’t allow passenger trains on their rails in a timely manner — sometimes passenger trains here get delayed for hours because Union Pacific keeps routing one freight train after another onto the lines.

    Assuming that the fares are competitive with airlines — a no-brainer given that trains are far more fuel-efficient than planes and the price of aviation kerosene is going to just keep going up — definitely I would ride the train rather than fly to Los Angelese. It takes two hours just to get into SFO and out of LAX at the other end, even if the flight itself is only 45 minutes. As for those who talk about earthquakes, this is basically a Japanese design, and all the Japanese designs are built to deal with earthquakes (duh, they live on an earthquake fault line too).

    So I look forward to it being built, even though it’ll be retirement time by the time I can actually enjoy it. Sigh.

  • http://blog.badtux.net Badtux

    GOod for them. Rail here in Northern California is very popular. Peak hour Caltrain is standing room only as is BART and the VTA light rail and the Muni light rail. Private passenger trains can’t compete with highway transportation because roads are subsidized by taxes, unlike railroads, so it makes sense to subsidize passenger rail with tax money too so that they can compete on an even basis. And unfortunately, our experience here in Northern California (and Amtrak’s experience nationwide) is that the actual rails to be owned by the public because the freight lines won’t allow passenger trains on their rails in a timely manner — sometimes passenger trains here get delayed for hours because Union Pacific keeps routing one freight train after another onto the lines.

    Assuming that the fares are competitive with airlines — a no-brainer given that trains are far more fuel-efficient than planes and the price of aviation kerosene is going to just keep going up — definitely I would ride the train rather than fly to Los Angelese. It takes two hours just to get into SFO and out of LAX at the other end, even if the flight itself is only 45 minutes. As for those who talk about earthquakes, this is basically a Japanese design, and all the Japanese designs are built to deal with earthquakes (duh, they live on an earthquake fault line too).

    So I look forward to it being built, even though it’ll be retirement time by the time I can actually enjoy it. Sigh.

  • http://www.autocar-live.com AutoCar-Live

    I have submitted your article to http://www.autocar-live.com which is a social site where users can submit car/auto articles and vote for already submitted articles.

  • http://www.autocar-live.com AutoCar-Live

    I have submitted your article to http://www.autocar-live.com which is a social site where users can submit car/auto articles and vote for already submitted articles.

  • http://www.autocar-live.com AutoCar-Live

    I have submitted your article to http://www.autocar-live.com which is a social site where users can submit car/auto articles and vote for already submitted articles.

  • magedogtag

    neat concept. totally impractical. that is unless everyone who flies up and down the coast never uses a rental car when they get where they are going. you aint gonna get many people who drive because of the personal mobility factor to ride the train more than one time just for the experience.

    and yeah, like the dude said below- it’s california, it’s gonna cost minimum twice what is projected, probably four or five times, and people will be taxed enormously for it when it fails to meet revenue needs. might as well call it the concord. fast, pretty, expensive as hell.

    good luck california. socialist stupidity is gonna destroy you yet.

  • magedogtag

    neat concept. totally impractical. that is unless everyone who flies up and down the coast never uses a rental car when they get where they are going. you aint gonna get many people who drive because of the personal mobility factor to ride the train more than one time just for the experience.

    and yeah, like the dude said below- it’s california, it’s gonna cost minimum twice what is projected, probably four or five times, and people will be taxed enormously for it when it fails to meet revenue needs. might as well call it the concord. fast, pretty, expensive as hell.

    good luck california. socialist stupidity is gonna destroy you yet.

  • joad

    Lies! Every time I hear this crap I want to punch faces. It will never happen. 2030, bah. Our country is so stupid broken, it’s not getting fixed. If China can have high speed rails already, we’re screwed.

  • joad

    Lies! Every time I hear this crap I want to punch faces. It will never happen. 2030, bah. Our country is so stupid broken, it’s not getting fixed. If China can have high speed rails already, we’re screwed.

  • Tim E

    I wish I wish I wish we could implement something like this in the west, but people making comparisons between Europe, Japan, and the western US are not thinking at all how much space exists out here. Also, towns and cities are laid out completely differently than old cities in Europe and Japan. It’s completely non-radial out here, and rail systems just don’t fit well with the geocultural layout. I do wish we had a bullet train system between Seattle and San Diego, though. That’d be blissful.

  • Tim E

    I wish I wish I wish we could implement something like this in the west, but people making comparisons between Europe, Japan, and the western US are not thinking at all how much space exists out here. Also, towns and cities are laid out completely differently than old cities in Europe and Japan. It’s completely non-radial out here, and rail systems just don’t fit well with the geocultural layout. I do wish we had a bullet train system between Seattle and San Diego, though. That’d be blissful.

  • Tim E

    I wish I wish I wish we could implement something like this in the west, but people making comparisons between Europe, Japan, and the western US are not thinking at all how much space exists out here. Also, towns and cities are laid out completely differently than old cities in Europe and Japan. It’s completely non-radial out here, and rail systems just don’t fit well with the geocultural layout. I do wish we had a bullet train system between Seattle and San Diego, though. That’d be blissful.

  • jt

    Rail is not dead in California “koowan” it so happens that rail is growing by leaps and bounds in california. Amtraks top 3 most successful train routes are in California, and setting record ridership – and more communities are asking for stations. Keep in mind our population will be at or exceed 50 million people by the time this is done and great majority of those people and that new growth be be exacly where this train will go.

  • jt

    Rail is not dead in California “koowan” it so happens that rail is growing by leaps and bounds in california. Amtraks top 3 most successful train routes are in California, and setting record ridership – and more communities are asking for stations. Keep in mind our population will be at or exceed 50 million people by the time this is done and great majority of those people and that new growth be be exacly where this train will go.

  • jt

    Rail is not dead in California “koowan” it so happens that rail is growing by leaps and bounds in california. Amtraks top 3 most successful train routes are in California, and setting record ridership – and more communities are asking for stations. Keep in mind our population will be at or exceed 50 million people by the time this is done and great majority of those people and that new growth be be exacly where this train will go.

  • Algernon

    I think this is a great idea.

    I wish we could use high speed trains like in Europe or Japan throughout the country, but it’s not realistic. This high-speed train would take 12 1/2 hours from NYC to LA, instead of 5 hours by plane. SF to LA is as far as I would want to travel by train. Europe and Japan also don’t have major cities separated by vast deserts and plains.

    As for feasibility, I think this could work. New England and California are the only parts of the country where Amtrak still makes money. I think this train would be used enough to justify the cost, especially with the increase in fuel prices.

  • Algernon

    I think this is a great idea.

    I wish we could use high speed trains like in Europe or Japan throughout the country, but it’s not realistic. This high-speed train would take 12 1/2 hours from NYC to LA, instead of 5 hours by plane. SF to LA is as far as I would want to travel by train. Europe and Japan also don’t have major cities separated by vast deserts and plains.

    As for feasibility, I think this could work. New England and California are the only parts of the country where Amtrak still makes money. I think this train would be used enough to justify the cost, especially with the increase in fuel prices.

  • Algernon

    I think this is a great idea.

    I wish we could use high speed trains like in Europe or Japan throughout the country, but it’s not realistic. This high-speed train would take 12 1/2 hours from NYC to LA, instead of 5 hours by plane. SF to LA is as far as I would want to travel by train. Europe and Japan also don’t have major cities separated by vast deserts and plains.

    As for feasibility, I think this could work. New England and California are the only parts of the country where Amtrak still makes money. I think this train would be used enough to justify the cost, especially with the increase in fuel prices.

  • http://www.keyboard-culture-global-warming.com Mr. Sustainable

    It’s a great idea but California should adopt the Interstate Traveler instead. It will be MUCH cheaper and can be constructed between the two cities in a matter of a few years, not decades.

  • http://www.keyboard-culture-global-warming.com Mr. Sustainable

    It’s a great idea but California should adopt the Interstate Traveler instead. It will be MUCH cheaper and can be constructed between the two cities in a matter of a few years, not decades.

  • http://www.keyboard-culture-global-warming.com Mr. Sustainable

    It’s a great idea but California should adopt the Interstate Traveler instead. It will be MUCH cheaper and can be constructed between the two cities in a matter of a few years, not decades.

  • Sean

    Major infrastructure projects like trains can only be borne by governments since the payback horizon of private companies (and horizons of politician’s mandates) is too short. In addition, the cost-benefit analysis should take into account non-monetized aspects such as decrease in pollution, lesser stress on travellers, increasing potential working radius, decreasing road wear and tear etc. Governments exist to do what individuals or smaller groupings cannot easily do — invest in infrastructure that benefits society as a whole. Would the Interstate system have ever been built without the government? Would Medicare ever have existed?

  • Sean

    Major infrastructure projects like trains can only be borne by governments since the payback horizon of private companies (and horizons of politician’s mandates) is too short. In addition, the cost-benefit analysis should take into account non-monetized aspects such as decrease in pollution, lesser stress on travellers, increasing potential working radius, decreasing road wear and tear etc. Governments exist to do what individuals or smaller groupings cannot easily do — invest in infrastructure that benefits society as a whole. Would the Interstate system have ever been built without the government? Would Medicare ever have existed?

  • Sean

    Major infrastructure projects like trains can only be borne by governments since the payback horizon of private companies (and horizons of politician’s mandates) is too short. In addition, the cost-benefit analysis should take into account non-monetized aspects such as decrease in pollution, lesser stress on travellers, increasing potential working radius, decreasing road wear and tear etc. Governments exist to do what individuals or smaller groupings cannot easily do — invest in infrastructure that benefits society as a whole. Would the Interstate system have ever been built without the government? Would Medicare ever have existed?

  • Johnny

    Whats the point, it will cost the same as driving and you have to wait on the train and ride with people you don’t even like, you can’t smoke no not even weed, can’t drink, well maybe they will sell beer, you can’t stop and stretch your legs. Sounds like another another Asian troll ride.

    Being green is just as bad as being oil dependent and will cost more or they would leave it alone.

  • Johnny

    Whats the point, it will cost the same as driving and you have to wait on the train and ride with people you don’t even like, you can’t smoke no not even weed, can’t drink, well maybe they will sell beer, you can’t stop and stretch your legs. Sounds like another another Asian troll ride.

    Being green is just as bad as being oil dependent and will cost more or they would leave it alone.

  • Johnny

    Whats the point, it will cost the same as driving and you have to wait on the train and ride with people you don’t even like, you can’t smoke no not even weed, can’t drink, well maybe they will sell beer, you can’t stop and stretch your legs. Sounds like another another Asian troll ride.

    Being green is just as bad as being oil dependent and will cost more or they would leave it alone.

  • Vito

    They should have a train car(s) for cars on this train, allow people to sit in the car during the trip. They do this successfully in Europe.

  • Vito

    They should have a train car(s) for cars on this train, allow people to sit in the car during the trip. They do this successfully in Europe.

  • DJ

    Build it and they will come. “This high-speed train would take 12 1/2 hours from NYC to LA, instead of 5 hours by plane.” – True but ex. from Madrid to Copenhagen is half that distance and you would fly not take a train.

  • DJ

    Build it and they will come. “This high-speed train would take 12 1/2 hours from NYC to LA, instead of 5 hours by plane.” – True but ex. from Madrid to Copenhagen is half that distance and you would fly not take a train.

  • DJ

    Build it and they will come. “This high-speed train would take 12 1/2 hours from NYC to LA, instead of 5 hours by plane.” – True but ex. from Madrid to Copenhagen is half that distance and you would fly not take a train.

  • DrDave

    Just Stumbled across this and wanted to add that I just heard the other day that Union Pacific won’t offer their right-of-way for this project because it’s too dangerous. California can either acquire it thru imminent domain and lease it back to them or…..just give up on the project which is probably what’s going to happen.

    Sorry to rain on your parade. I, personally, think we’re waaaaay behind the rest of the world when it comes to mass transit.

  • DrDave

    Just Stumbled across this and wanted to add that I just heard the other day that Union Pacific won’t offer their right-of-way for this project because it’s too dangerous. California can either acquire it thru imminent domain and lease it back to them or…..just give up on the project which is probably what’s going to happen.

    Sorry to rain on your parade. I, personally, think we’re waaaaay behind the rest of the world when it comes to mass transit.

  • DrDave

    Just Stumbled across this and wanted to add that I just heard the other day that Union Pacific won’t offer their right-of-way for this project because it’s too dangerous. California can either acquire it thru imminent domain and lease it back to them or…..just give up on the project which is probably what’s going to happen.

    Sorry to rain on your parade. I, personally, think we’re waaaaay behind the rest of the world when it comes to mass transit.

  • http://www.cocomment.com Jonathon Nierengarten

    I’d take that train over Virgin America or Southwest any day. Hopefully they can make the accommodations as nice as the Amtraks on the East Coast.

  • http://www.cocomment.com Jonathon Nierengarten

    I’d take that train over Virgin America or Southwest any day. Hopefully they can make the accommodations as nice as the Amtraks on the East Coast.

  • http://www.cocomment.com Jonathon Nierengarten

    I’d take that train over Virgin America or Southwest any day. Hopefully they can make the accommodations as nice as the Amtraks on the East Coast.

  • http://www.cocomment.com Jonathon Nierengarten

    onion, probably the same thing that happens to the other railways in California. Amtrak, etc. The lobbyists for airlines don’t need to crush a nationwide network. It’s not feasible. West of the Mississippi River, the country is not densely populated enough to justify the expense of a network of high speed trains traversing the extremely rugged terrain of this fine nation. However, from Seattle to Portland to SF to LA to SD probably makes a great deal of sense if the costs can be kept reasonable.

  • http://www.cocomment.com Jonathon Nierengarten

    onion, probably the same thing that happens to the other railways in California. Amtrak, etc. The lobbyists for airlines don’t need to crush a nationwide network. It’s not feasible. West of the Mississippi River, the country is not densely populated enough to justify the expense of a network of high speed trains traversing the extremely rugged terrain of this fine nation. However, from Seattle to Portland to SF to LA to SD probably makes a great deal of sense if the costs can be kept reasonable.

  • Ken

    Koowan – you are an idiot. The cost to build one mile of new highway far exceeds the cost of rail. Once a a road is built the state (county, city) gets nothing in return. High speed rail costs a fraction of what it cost to build a road and it returns money in the form of faires. This is a no-brainer. Get a clue.

  • Ken

    Koowan – you are an idiot. The cost to build one mile of new highway far exceeds the cost of rail. Once a a road is built the state (county, city) gets nothing in return. High speed rail costs a fraction of what it cost to build a road and it returns money in the form of faires. This is a no-brainer. Get a clue.

  • MBell

    About time they started implamenting this. I would take a train in a heartbeat to LA if it were as quick as they claim it will be. I prefer trains. i dont have to deal with horrendous traffic and trying to avoid idiot drivers on the road. I also wouldnt have to deal with taking planes where you’re practicaly strip searched going through security. If I’m tired I can sleep, there’s more room for your legs to stretch then a plane provides, and there is a food car where you can actually dine. I take the trian all the time when I go back east.

  • MBell

    About time they started implamenting this. I would take a train in a heartbeat to LA if it were as quick as they claim it will be. I prefer trains. i dont have to deal with horrendous traffic and trying to avoid idiot drivers on the road. I also wouldnt have to deal with taking planes where you’re practicaly strip searched going through security. If I’m tired I can sleep, there’s more room for your legs to stretch then a plane provides, and there is a food car where you can actually dine. I take the trian all the time when I go back east.

  • MBell

    About time they started implamenting this. I would take a train in a heartbeat to LA if it were as quick as they claim it will be. I prefer trains. i dont have to deal with horrendous traffic and trying to avoid idiot drivers on the road. I also wouldnt have to deal with taking planes where you’re practicaly strip searched going through security. If I’m tired I can sleep, there’s more room for your legs to stretch then a plane provides, and there is a food car where you can actually dine. I take the trian all the time when I go back east.

  • Jon

    If anyone says that Airlines are a better option they don’t know a thing about the industry.

    Airlines lose money on commuter flights. They make money on a huge 747 packed with people going from NYC to LA. And with gas prices increasing American is now ENDING some of its commuter flights and is requiring a 1 night minimum in nearly all of its flights. No longer can the business person travel to a major meeting in SF and be back in LA for dinner. Unless you own a private jet, HSR will be your best bet.

    And If we’re smart… there are enough HSR stops in growing locations that we will build up instead of sprawl out. Sprawl creates traffic and now matter how wide the freeways get, the more we sprawl the more lanes and freeways we will need.

  • Jon

    If anyone says that Airlines are a better option they don’t know a thing about the industry.

    Airlines lose money on commuter flights. They make money on a huge 747 packed with people going from NYC to LA. And with gas prices increasing American is now ENDING some of its commuter flights and is requiring a 1 night minimum in nearly all of its flights. No longer can the business person travel to a major meeting in SF and be back in LA for dinner. Unless you own a private jet, HSR will be your best bet.

    And If we’re smart… there are enough HSR stops in growing locations that we will build up instead of sprawl out. Sprawl creates traffic and now matter how wide the freeways get, the more we sprawl the more lanes and freeways we will need.

  • Jon

    If anyone says that Airlines are a better option they don’t know a thing about the industry.

    Airlines lose money on commuter flights. They make money on a huge 747 packed with people going from NYC to LA. And with gas prices increasing American is now ENDING some of its commuter flights and is requiring a 1 night minimum in nearly all of its flights. No longer can the business person travel to a major meeting in SF and be back in LA for dinner. Unless you own a private jet, HSR will be your best bet.

    And If we’re smart… there are enough HSR stops in growing locations that we will build up instead of sprawl out. Sprawl creates traffic and now matter how wide the freeways get, the more we sprawl the more lanes and freeways we will need.

  • http://www.cocomment.com Jonathon Nierengarten

    when can i buy tickets?

  • http://www.cocomment.com Jonathon Nierengarten

    when can i buy tickets?

  • http://www.cocomment.com Jonathon Nierengarten

    when can i buy tickets?

  • Henry Gibson

    The biggest need is between Las Vegas and LA and make it a car train. Use the old tracks with Pendolino tilting train technology. Vegas to LA by plane is a waste of airport search time. ..HG…

  • Henry Gibson

    The biggest need is between Las Vegas and LA and make it a car train. Use the old tracks with Pendolino tilting train technology. Vegas to LA by plane is a waste of airport search time. ..HG…

  • Henry Gibson

    The biggest need is between Las Vegas and LA and make it a car train. Use the old tracks with Pendolino tilting train technology. Vegas to LA by plane is a waste of airport search time. ..HG…

  • Henry Gibson

    The biggest need is between Las Vegas and LA and make it a car train. Use the old tracks with Pendolino tilting train technology. Vegas to LA by plane is a waste of airport search time. ..HG…

  • Douglas Fitch

    What type of fuels will power the stations providing the electricity. If’s it’s solar, wind or hydrolic power, that would be fantastic!!!

  • Douglas Fitch

    What type of fuels will power the stations providing the electricity. If’s it’s solar, wind or hydrolic power, that would be fantastic!!!

  • Douglas Fitch

    What type of fuels will power the stations providing the electricity. If’s it’s solar, wind or hydrolic power, that would be fantastic!!!

  • Douglas Fitch

    What type of fuels will power the stations providing the electricity. If’s it’s solar, wind or hydrolic power, that would be fantastic!!!

  • Mike

    FINALLY!!!

    The USA unfortunately behind the world in many areas. What USA built extraordinary for last 40 years? Just a Verrazano bridge – not much! The WTC re-building is a full disaster and frustration. Shame on american!

    The high speed train is an example of real progress!!!

    JUST DO IT AS FAST AS POSSIBLE!!! Time is clicking!!!

  • Mike

    FINALLY!!!

    The USA unfortunately behind the world in many areas. What USA built extraordinary for last 40 years? Just a Verrazano bridge – not much! The WTC re-building is a full disaster and frustration. Shame on american!

    The high speed train is an example of real progress!!!

    JUST DO IT AS FAST AS POSSIBLE!!! Time is clicking!!!

  • Mike

    FINALLY!!!

    The USA unfortunately behind the world in many areas. What USA built extraordinary for last 40 years? Just a Verrazano bridge – not much! The WTC re-building is a full disaster and frustration. Shame on american!

    The high speed train is an example of real progress!!!

    JUST DO IT AS FAST AS POSSIBLE!!! Time is clicking!!!

  • Mike

    FINALLY!!!

    The USA unfortunately behind the world in many areas. What USA built extraordinary for last 40 years? Just a Verrazano bridge – not much! The WTC re-building is a full disaster and frustration. Shame on american!

    The high speed train is an example of real progress!!!

    JUST DO IT AS FAST AS POSSIBLE!!! Time is clicking!!!

  • Alain

    “Europe’s rail systems are amazing, and the United States system sucks balls. took me 24 hours to get from Cincinnati to Washington DC, it’s ridiculous”

    24 hours for 425 miles? Are you kidding me?

    The journey from Paris to Marseille takes just 3 hours and covers a distance of 783 km (489 miles) averaging a speed of 261 kph (163 mph).

    The record from Lille to Marseille in 2001 was 3 hours and 29 minutes for 1067 km (663 miles).

    Average speed: 305 kmh (190 mph) !!

    3 Apr 2007 a new French train exceeded 357 mph and broke the speed record for conventional trains.

    The commercial speed of the new French AVG train introduced several months ago is 360 kmph (224 mph)

    If Californians wake up now, the rest of Americans will do the same after them.

    However, the first HSR will be soon ready in Argentina, let’s say in 4-5 years with French TGV trains.

    But let’s look at the bright side. Americans don’t have to develop technology. Others have already done it. Besides, French, Germans and Japaneses have a quite comprehensive experience with HSR.

    Good luck with your Californian project but make no mistake. Try now to learn from others who have succeeded.

  • Alain

    “Europe’s rail systems are amazing, and the United States system sucks balls. took me 24 hours to get from Cincinnati to Washington DC, it’s ridiculous”

    24 hours for 425 miles? Are you kidding me?

    The journey from Paris to Marseille takes just 3 hours and covers a distance of 783 km (489 miles) averaging a speed of 261 kph (163 mph).

    The record from Lille to Marseille in 2001 was 3 hours and 29 minutes for 1067 km (663 miles).

    Average speed: 305 kmh (190 mph) !!

    3 Apr 2007 a new French train exceeded 357 mph and broke the speed record for conventional trains.

    The commercial speed of the new French AVG train introduced several months ago is 360 kmph (224 mph)

    If Californians wake up now, the rest of Americans will do the same after them.

    However, the first HSR will be soon ready in Argentina, let’s say in 4-5 years with French TGV trains.

    But let’s look at the bright side. Americans don’t have to develop technology. Others have already done it. Besides, French, Germans and Japaneses have a quite comprehensive experience with HSR.

    Good luck with your Californian project but make no mistake. Try now to learn from others who have succeeded.

  • Alain

    “Europe’s rail systems are amazing, and the United States system sucks balls. took me 24 hours to get from Cincinnati to Washington DC, it’s ridiculous”

    24 hours for 425 miles? Are you kidding me?

    The journey from Paris to Marseille takes just 3 hours and covers a distance of 783 km (489 miles) averaging a speed of 261 kph (163 mph).

    The record from Lille to Marseille in 2001 was 3 hours and 29 minutes for 1067 km (663 miles).

    Average speed: 305 kmh (190 mph) !!

    3 Apr 2007 a new French train exceeded 357 mph and broke the speed record for conventional trains.

    The commercial speed of the new French AVG train introduced several months ago is 360 kmph (224 mph)

    If Californians wake up now, the rest of Americans will do the same after them.

    However, the first HSR will be soon ready in Argentina, let’s say in 4-5 years with French TGV trains.

    But let’s look at the bright side. Americans don’t have to develop technology. Others have already done it. Besides, French, Germans and Japaneses have a quite comprehensive experience with HSR.

    Good luck with your Californian project but make no mistake. Try now to learn from others who have succeeded.

  • Alain

    “Europe’s rail systems are amazing, and the United States system sucks balls. took me 24 hours to get from Cincinnati to Washington DC, it’s ridiculous”

    24 hours for 425 miles? Are you kidding me?

    The journey from Paris to Marseille takes just 3 hours and covers a distance of 783 km (489 miles) averaging a speed of 261 kph (163 mph).

    The record from Lille to Marseille in 2001 was 3 hours and 29 minutes for 1067 km (663 miles).

    Average speed: 305 kmh (190 mph) !!

    3 Apr 2007 a new French train exceeded 357 mph and broke the speed record for conventional trains.

    The commercial speed of the new French AVG train introduced several months ago is 360 kmph (224 mph)

    If Californians wake up now, the rest of Americans will do the same after them.

    However, the first HSR will be soon ready in Argentina, let’s say in 4-5 years with French TGV trains.

    But let’s look at the bright side. Americans don’t have to develop technology. Others have already done it. Besides, French, Germans and Japaneses have a quite comprehensive experience with HSR.

    Good luck with your Californian project but make no mistake. Try now to learn from others who have succeeded.

  • Mike

    A nice idea but 220 mph by 2030 is really not that fast. This should be a maglev train which can compete with the speed of a plane.

    I wish that they would put a maglev system on the east coast carridor because currently I can drive from Philadelphia to NYC or DC faster than the train and for much less (Amtrek what are you doing?)

  • Mike

    A nice idea but 220 mph by 2030 is really not that fast. This should be a maglev train which can compete with the speed of a plane.

    I wish that they would put a maglev system on the east coast carridor because currently I can drive from Philadelphia to NYC or DC faster than the train and for much less (Amtrek what are you doing?)

  • Mike

    A nice idea but 220 mph by 2030 is really not that fast. This should be a maglev train which can compete with the speed of a plane.

    I wish that they would put a maglev system on the east coast carridor because currently I can drive from Philadelphia to NYC or DC faster than the train and for much less (Amtrek what are you doing?)

  • logan

    ya what about michigan…

  • logan

    ya what about michigan…

  • logan

    ya what about michigan…

  • logan

    ya what about michigan…

  • Richard Horne

    We have train service from Los Angeles to San Francisco. Up date it!

    A better way to go is to use Freeway rite of way and build a Monorail system. It will not cost any near ten billion dollars $10,000,000.000.00.

  • Richard Horne

    We have train service from Los Angeles to San Francisco. Up date it!

    A better way to go is to use Freeway rite of way and build a Monorail system. It will not cost any near ten billion dollars $10,000,000.000.00.

  • Richard Horne

    We have train service from Los Angeles to San Francisco. Up date it!

    A better way to go is to use Freeway rite of way and build a Monorail system. It will not cost any near ten billion dollars $10,000,000.000.00.

  • JOANNA

    that plan is really idiotic in my opinion. billions to build it. then 4 billion a year from then on to maintain it. and realistically speaking, it is not going to boost the economy. our kids’ kids’ kids are still gonna be paying for it… worst of it is.. they aren’t even gonna start now.. it might happen in 4 or so years.

  • JOANNA

    that plan is really idiotic in my opinion. billions to build it. then 4 billion a year from then on to maintain it. and realistically speaking, it is not going to boost the economy. our kids’ kids’ kids are still gonna be paying for it… worst of it is.. they aren’t even gonna start now.. it might happen in 4 or so years.

  • JOANNA

    that plan is really idiotic in my opinion. billions to build it. then 4 billion a year from then on to maintain it. and realistically speaking, it is not going to boost the economy. our kids’ kids’ kids are still gonna be paying for it… worst of it is.. they aren’t even gonna start now.. it might happen in 4 or so years.

  • Mary Vazquez

    This should be done in 5 years not 22!!! Why the hell is it going to take so long? We build all kinds of things in a very short amount of time! Why not this???? It’s embarrassing!

  • Mary Vazquez

    This should be done in 5 years not 22!!! Why the hell is it going to take so long? We build all kinds of things in a very short amount of time! Why not this???? It’s embarrassing!

  • Mary Vazquez

    This should be done in 5 years not 22!!! Why the hell is it going to take so long? We build all kinds of things in a very short amount of time! Why not this???? It’s embarrassing!

  • jonathon nierengarten

    Crying shame we’re bankrupt and this will no long be happening.. this century.

  • jonathon nierengarten

    Crying shame we’re bankrupt and this will no long be happening.. this century.

  • Richard J Peters

    How will the rapid train traverse the tehachipis? Will they tunnel through?

  • Richard J Peters

    How will the rapid train traverse the tehachipis? Will they tunnel through?

  • Jim

    I think the rail fanatics are disappointed that AMTRAK doesn’t spend enough, and doesn’t enough money. They are coming up with this scheme. It will cost five times their current estimates and will not be worth it. If it was worth doing, it would have been done already.

  • Jim

    I think the rail fanatics are disappointed that AMTRAK doesn’t spend enough, and doesn’t enough money. They are coming up with this scheme. It will cost five times their current estimates and will not be worth it. If it was worth doing, it would have been done already.

  • Jim

    I think the rail fanatics are disappointed that AMTRAK doesn’t spend enough, and doesn’t enough money. They are coming up with this scheme. It will cost five times their current estimates and will not be worth it. If it was worth doing, it would have been done already.

  • Jim

    I think the rail fanatics are disappointed that AMTRAK doesn’t spend enough, and doesn’t enough money. They are coming up with this scheme. It will cost five times their current estimates and will not be worth it. If it was worth doing, it would have been done already.

  • Dave

    Hmm, Alabama needs one like this

  • http://www.myblazetek.com sunny

    i think its a great idea, i wish it could have been made by now. it would make my life easy. and it would create jobs:)

  • Donny

    It’s nice to look at early estimates for infrastructure projects. It’s 2013 now, and I think this rail project is in the $65 billion range. Elon Musk just released his proposal for a 760mph tube transport between LA and SF that he says would only cost $6 billion.

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