Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Honda Civic GX, NGV, Natural Gas Vehicle

Published on May 5th, 2008 | by Clayton

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The Cleanest Cars on Earth?: Honda Civic GX and Other Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs)

Honda Civic GX, NGV, Natural Gas Vehicle

Clean Burning Natural Gas Vehicles (NGVs) are hot commodities in some parts of the country, where fuel can sell for as low as $0.63 per gallon.

Unlike the world’s most fuel efficient car (VW’s 285 MPG bullet), the Honda Civic GX looks like a standard passenger vehicle. What makes it special is what you don’t see: tailpipe emissions that are often cleaner than ambient air.

The Civic GX is powered by compressed natural gas—methane—the simplest and cleanest-burning hydrocarbon available. With an economical 113-hp, 1.8-Liter engine, the EPA has called the Civic the “world’s cleanest internal-combustion vehicle” with 90% cleaner emissions than the average gasoline-powered car on the road in 2004.

And get this: in Utah, natural gas can be purchased for $0.63 per gallon.

At $24,590, buying a new Civic GX won’t exactly break your bank account, especially since up to $7,000 will come back to you in the form of state and federal tax credits. But don’t expect to find one easily. The car is only sold in two states, New York and California, and Honda can’t build them fast enough. One dealership said they have over 80 people waiting to buy.

Continue reading about Natural Gas Vehicles on Page 2:



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About the Author

In a past life, Clayton was a professional blogger and editor of Gas 2.0, Important Media’s blog covering the future of sustainable transportation. He was also the Managing Editor for GO Media, the predecessor to Important Media.



  • Joe

    Rubbish. Hydrogen is far cleaner because it has *zero* harmful emissions, only water vapor.

    • Elmer

      Joe your simplistic approach to this subject fails to mention that the USA is nowhere close to having a Hydrogen infrastructure, but that a natural gas or methane infrastructure already exists.

      It should also be noted that longer term most places where Methane is used a Hydrogen fuel could be easily adapted for usage so any methane work is certainly not wasted, but merely a transitional fuel that is Domestically sourced until we can establish a Hydrogen Infrastructure.

  • Joe

    Rubbish. Hydrogen is far cleaner because it has *zero* harmful emissions, only water vapor.

    • Elmer

      Joe again you are being too simple in your evaluation> i see where someone has already mentioned the inherent dirtiness of the production of Hydrogen, which is certainly true, but there is also the embedded cost and dirtiness of the transportation of the compressed Hydrogen.

  • Wayne

    What about the danger of natural gas? Isn’t it extremely explosive? How does that work out?

    • http://Web Rand

      No, Compressed natural gas is far safer than gasoline. It will not burn in it’s compressed state and if it escapes as in the case of a gas line rupture it will not pool arount the leak. Rather it disipates into the atmousphere and it is not harmful to the environment like gas. It has no VOCs like gas and is a naturaly occuring gas from decomposing plant and animal waste.

  • Wayne

    What about the danger of natural gas? Isn’t it extremely explosive? How does that work out?

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Joe: Hydrogen is only clean if produced via clean power. Right now, it’s not so clean. Same problem here: natural gas is a fossil fuel, but can also be produced by breakdown of plant material. So it just depends where you get it.

    Wayne: Most of the sources say that because natural gas doesn’t pool as a liquid, but instead immediately evaporates, that it’s less likely to ignite.

    The NGVA says:

    “The fuel storage cylinders used in NGVs are much stronger than gasoline fuel tanks. The design of NGV cylinders are subjected to a number of federally required ” severe abuse” tests, such as heat and pressure extremes, gunfire, collisions and fires.”

    • Elmer

      Clayton great response, but I need to expand upon your comment about natural Gas being a fossil fuel “but can also be produced by the breakdown of plant material” which by definition is what all fossil fuels are.

      I suspect the point you were trying to make is that unlike Oil which takes much longer that methane it can be produced from recent deposits of materials such as the methane produced by landfills that are years old instead of centuries old. The “Landfill Gas” has only recently been directed toward power production as in decades past it was simply burned or “flared” to the atmosphere without using the heat it produces for electricity generation.

      The point you make about the testing of the tanks does tend to imply that once that hurdle to alternative automobiles is accomplished very little change would need to be made to use Hydrogen as a fuel so this accomplishes the shorter term goal as well as it enables the infrastructure for the longer term goal of Hydrogen to be accomplished ahead of the actual supply issues being accomplished.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Joe: Hydrogen is only clean if produced via clean power. Right now, it’s not so clean. Same problem here: natural gas is a fossil fuel, but can also be produced by breakdown of plant material. So it just depends where you get it.

    Wayne: Most of the sources say that because natural gas doesn’t pool as a liquid, but instead immediately evaporates, that it’s less likely to ignite.

    The NGVA says:

    “The fuel storage cylinders used in NGVs are much stronger than gasoline fuel tanks. The design of NGV cylinders are subjected to a number of federally required ” severe abuse” tests, such as heat and pressure extremes, gunfire, collisions and fires.”

  • Strawgate

    http://www.naturalgas.org/business/analysis.asp

    Estimates of Available Natural Gas supplies in the United States range from 1,127 – 1,451 Trillion Cubic Feet of Natural Gas.

  • Strawgate

    http://www.naturalgas.org/business/analysis.asp

    Estimates of Available Natural Gas supplies in the United States range from 1,127 – 1,451 Trillion Cubic Feet of Natural Gas.

  • Nick Wellinghoff

    Just like any problem we need to attack fuel usage from many angles. The government should throw down the hammer and make tighter restrictions on the type of cars you are allowed to drive. You can still buy any car you want but you will just have to pay extra tax to buy a large car when you don’t need to be driving one. All of these 20mpg cars are just a total waste. We could reduce usage by 50% right off the bat by selling cars that get 40mpg.

  • Nick Wellinghoff

    Just like any problem we need to attack fuel usage from many angles. The government should throw down the hammer and make tighter restrictions on the type of cars you are allowed to drive. You can still buy any car you want but you will just have to pay extra tax to buy a large car when you don’t need to be driving one. All of these 20mpg cars are just a total waste. We could reduce usage by 50% right off the bat by selling cars that get 40mpg.

  • Steve

    The use of the term “explosion” seems to be a poor choice here:

    “Drawbacks to the Civic GX and other Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles

    Earlier this week I was clued-in to the explosion of compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles in Southern Utah…”

    I thought they were literally exploding until I clicked the link.

  • Steve

    The use of the term “explosion” seems to be a poor choice here:

    “Drawbacks to the Civic GX and other Compressed Natural Gas Vehicles

    Earlier this week I was clued-in to the explosion of compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles in Southern Utah…”

    I thought they were literally exploding until I clicked the link.

  • http://gas2.org/2008/05/05/the-cleanest-cars-on-earth-honda-civic-gx-and-other-natural-gas-vehicles-ngvs/#more-401 Brett

    Know the difference between ‘proven reserves’ and ‘proved reserves’. Proved reserves have increased yearly within the US. As stated by Strawgate, ‘Estimates of Available Natural Gas supplies in the United States range from 1,127 – 1,451 Trillion Cubic Feet of Natural Gas.’

  • http://gas2.org/2008/05/05/the-cleanest-cars-on-earth-honda-civic-gx-and-other-natural-gas-vehicles-ngvs/#more-401 Brett

    Know the difference between ‘proven reserves’ and ‘proved reserves’. Proved reserves have increased yearly within the US. As stated by Strawgate, ‘Estimates of Available Natural Gas supplies in the United States range from 1,127 – 1,451 Trillion Cubic Feet of Natural Gas.’

  • http://www.afrodream.com afrodream ‘n’ beaded sandals

    Natural gas will come a time it will be expensive and the criss will be the same as oil now. Both hydrogen and methane are highly explosive. Hydrogen is more environmental friendly though is explosive but we need that explosive part of it to make our car run. On my guess compress air, water and electricity can work the magic for our transport.

  • http://www.afrodream.com afrodream ‘n’ beaded sandals

    Natural gas will come a time it will be expensive and the criss will be the same as oil now. Both hydrogen and methane are highly explosive. Hydrogen is more environmental friendly though is explosive but we need that explosive part of it to make our car run. On my guess compress air, water and electricity can work the magic for our transport.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    @2 Steve: Point well taken. I had a good laugh when I saw that, and it has been changed to “explosion in popularity”. Thanks for the comment.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    @2 Steve: Point well taken. I had a good laugh when I saw that, and it has been changed to “explosion in popularity”. Thanks for the comment.

  • Phased Particle

    All car companies seem to be looking for a single option replacement to the long running fossil fuels vehicles we are all used to. With the available technologies many seem like good solutions for specific niches. As for the natural gas car why are they not looking at extending the functionality by making a natural gas hybrid. If the natural gas engine were used as the charging center for the electric vehicle its lower horsepower output would not be as much of an issue. Added driving range or smaller fuel storage tanks should also be a side result. Who is doing this type of vehicle?

    • Elmer

      The Chevy Volt can have it’s Generator fueled from many different sources as this was brought up during the design program where it was mentioned the Gen-set would be powered by Diesel on the European model the Opel variant.

  • Phased Particle

    All car companies seem to be looking for a single option replacement to the long running fossil fuels vehicles we are all used to. With the available technologies many seem like good solutions for specific niches. As for the natural gas car why are they not looking at extending the functionality by making a natural gas hybrid. If the natural gas engine were used as the charging center for the electric vehicle its lower horsepower output would not be as much of an issue. Added driving range or smaller fuel storage tanks should also be a side result. Who is doing this type of vehicle?

  • Phased Particle

    All car companies seem to be looking for a single option replacement to the long running fossil fuels vehicles we are all used to. With the available technologies many seem like good solutions for specific niches. As for the natural gas car why are they not looking at extending the functionality by making a natural gas hybrid. If the natural gas engine were used as the charging center for the electric vehicle its lower horsepower output would not be as much of an issue. Added driving range or smaller fuel storage tanks should also be a side result. Who is doing this type of vehicle?

  • http://www.mastercraftext.com Mastercraft Exteriors

    I agree with the natural gas hybrid. I think that we are not tapping into the hybrids like we should be. We sure are coming a long way in a short period of time though.

    Mastercraft Exteriors

  • http://www.mastercraftext.com Mastercraft Exteriors

    I agree with the natural gas hybrid. I think that we are not tapping into the hybrids like we should be. We sure are coming a long way in a short period of time though.

    Mastercraft Exteriors

  • http://www.mastercraftext.com Mastercraft Exteriors

    I agree with the natural gas hybrid. I think that we are not tapping into the hybrids like we should be. We sure are coming a long way in a short period of time though.

    Mastercraft Exteriors

  • http://cheatbuzz.com/ Lephtovermeet

    Unfortunately, the natural gas market is already in serious short supply. Anyone who’s home heating is provided by natural gas in the northeast, has felt the serious price fluctuations in the winter. This is due to lack of supply during prolonged increased demand.

    If Natural Gas cars were to become a serious market competitor, we would have to produce synthetic natural gas from another source (petroleum, coal, or biomass).

    • Elmer

      I am not sure where you are getting this misinformation from, but the reason that natural gas prices spiral upward is those commodity traders “whores” on wall street who care very little about anything but profits, and when the prices of heating oil and other petroleum based products tend to go upward because of increased demand in the winter months the commodity traders can increase the cost of natural gas as well and make more money. Isn’t the free market just wonderful?? LOL !!

  • http://cheatbuzz.com/ Lephtovermeet

    Unfortunately, the natural gas market is already in serious short supply. Anyone who’s home heating is provided by natural gas in the northeast, has felt the serious price fluctuations in the winter. This is due to lack of supply during prolonged increased demand.

    If Natural Gas cars were to become a serious market competitor, we would have to produce synthetic natural gas from another source (petroleum, coal, or biomass).

  • http://google Jim Morris

    You mention Honda and others, where are the others.

    I am trying to find NGV’s. Thats plural, or you selling Honda’s??

  • http://www.water4gas-scam.com Chuck

    Wow this is amazingly good news. I wish I had $24,000. But I guess I will in about 5 years and NG cars will be freely available by then. In the mean time I have started building a hydrogen system for my Honda odyssey and I only had to spend less than $100. But I haven’t finished making it yet, so I don’t know what mileage it will give me. If I’m lucky I’ll double my mileage, and if I’m unlucky, I’ll get 30%. Check it out on http://www.water4gas-scam.com and if you want to build it too, there is a free youtube video on the site

  • http://www.water4gas-scam.com Chuck

    Wow this is amazingly good news. I wish I had $24,000. But I guess I will in about 5 years and NG cars will be freely available by then. In the mean time I have started building a hydrogen system for my Honda odyssey and I only had to spend less than $100. But I haven’t finished making it yet, so I don’t know what mileage it will give me. If I’m lucky I’ll double my mileage, and if I’m unlucky, I’ll get 30%. Check it out on http://www.water4gas-scam.com and if you want to build it too, there is a free youtube video on the site

  • Ryan Bailey

    Natural gas is far less explosive than gasoline (the most dangerous fuel available), and hydrogen is even less explosive than that. CNG has been an auto fuel for over 20 years, and the statistics are consistent.

    I dare you to try and find a story about a natural gas vehicle exploding from its fuel content. By contrast, how many car-beques have you seen on the highway?

    When you check out the facts, how can you in good conscience put your family in a vehicle that’s carrying 10 gallons of cancer-causing, explosive liquid in an oversized milk carton?

  • Ryan Bailey

    Natural gas is far less explosive than gasoline (the most dangerous fuel available), and hydrogen is even less explosive than that. CNG has been an auto fuel for over 20 years, and the statistics are consistent.

    I dare you to try and find a story about a natural gas vehicle exploding from its fuel content. By contrast, how many car-beques have you seen on the highway?

    When you check out the facts, how can you in good conscience put your family in a vehicle that’s carrying 10 gallons of cancer-causing, explosive liquid in an oversized milk carton?

  • Dave

    As one of the Utah Honda NGV driver’s, I have a 2002, I have to say it’s nice to go 150 miles on less than 3.00. I have a filling station two blocks from where I work and another a couple miles away. I’m sure this won’t last forever, but the state has kept a good grip on prices so far.

    Not only does the car pollute less I can also ride solo in the carpool lane and park at the downtown meters for free.

    Because the car burns so clean oil changes are scheduled at 10,000 miles.

    A hybrid would be nice but I’ve heard in real world driving the 08′ is getting in the 40 mpg range. In anycase, there are already Gasoline/CNG cars, so why not add a plugin hybrid capability and give the people a choice of fuels? CNG/Electric at home depending on price and Gasoline or someday a Hydrogen/CNG blend for the longer trips? It’s a choice of fuels like the Volt is supposed to deliver. The technology is here, the only thing holding it back is cost and demand.

  • Dave

    As one of the Utah Honda NGV driver’s, I have a 2002, I have to say it’s nice to go 150 miles on less than 3.00. I have a filling station two blocks from where I work and another a couple miles away. I’m sure this won’t last forever, but the state has kept a good grip on prices so far.

    Not only does the car pollute less I can also ride solo in the carpool lane and park at the downtown meters for free.

    Because the car burns so clean oil changes are scheduled at 10,000 miles.

    A hybrid would be nice but I’ve heard in real world driving the 08′ is getting in the 40 mpg range. In anycase, there are already Gasoline/CNG cars, so why not add a plugin hybrid capability and give the people a choice of fuels? CNG/Electric at home depending on price and Gasoline or someday a Hydrogen/CNG blend for the longer trips? It’s a choice of fuels like the Volt is supposed to deliver. The technology is here, the only thing holding it back is cost and demand.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    @Dave: Thanks for the first-person report!

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    @Dave: Thanks for the first-person report!

  • http://www.autocar-live.com AutoCar-Live

    I have submitted your article to http://www.autocar-live.com which is a social site where users can submit car/auto articles and vote for already submitted articles.

  • http://www.autocar-live.com AutoCar-Live

    I have submitted your article to http://www.autocar-live.com which is a social site where users can submit car/auto articles and vote for already submitted articles.

  • http://www.devinhowe.com Devo

    I drive a 2000 Bi-fuel (CNG & CNG) Ford Contour and have loved it. It’s amazing that more people haven’t heard of CNG (and that many of the automakers got out of the business about 5 years ago.) In Utah, I got back 50% of the conversion cost of my car, drove for $0.63 per GGE (gasoline gallon equivalent), drove solo in the carpool lane, and parked for free at downtown meters. I’ve since moved to Washington and we’re going to install a pump to refuel at home. I love CNG and am not going back. Learn more about CNG at http://www.devinhowe.com

  • http://www.devinhowe.com Devo

    I drive a 2000 Bi-fuel (CNG & CNG) Ford Contour and have loved it. It’s amazing that more people haven’t heard of CNG (and that many of the automakers got out of the business about 5 years ago.) In Utah, I got back 50% of the conversion cost of my car, drove for $0.63 per GGE (gasoline gallon equivalent), drove solo in the carpool lane, and parked for free at downtown meters. I’ve since moved to Washington and we’re going to install a pump to refuel at home. I love CNG and am not going back. Learn more about CNG at http://www.devinhowe.com

  • Jay Bonham

    Great article. The US has only 3% of the world reserves http://www.naturalgas.org/overview/resources.asp

    The US can buy compressed or liquid natural gas when that runs out. Like Clayton says it may provide a bridge between gasoline/diesel and hydrogen. Why can’t we start with fleets (like school buses, postal trucks, city buses etc.). Combine this with plug-in hydrogen technology it may be very feasible and profitable!

  • Jay Bonham

    Great article. The US has only 3% of the world reserves http://www.naturalgas.org/overview/resources.asp

    The US can buy compressed or liquid natural gas when that runs out. Like Clayton says it may provide a bridge between gasoline/diesel and hydrogen. Why can’t we start with fleets (like school buses, postal trucks, city buses etc.). Combine this with plug-in hydrogen technology it may be very feasible and profitable!

  • Jay Bonham

    Whoops – I meant combine this technology with electric plug-in hybrid technology for fleets! See previous post.

  • Jay Bonham

    Whoops – I meant combine this technology with electric plug-in hybrid technology for fleets! See previous post.

  • Jack Birch

    Newt Gingrich is promoting a petition, “Drill here, Drill Now, Pay Less”. I think we have more off-shore natural gas than we can use my lifetime, my kids lifetime, and my grandkids lifetime and all we have to do sink the wells and get it. If the scientists that theorize that the reason ships and airplanes sink in the Bermuda Triangle is because of gas bubbles released from the ocean floor causing a lack of buoyancy than there is an abundant supply that needs to be tapped. But lets not stop there but lets tap the whole Atlantic and Pacific coast. Lets stop OPEC before we leave ourselves open to be blackmailed by a bunch of terrorist creeps. If we can get enough petitions to Congress, hopefully we can change their bull-headed stance and allow the drilling to proceed.

    To suddenly shift to natural gas vehicles isn’t realistic. There isn’t enough natural gas available. But we can start phasing in and as one comment writer stated we may blend into using hydrogen.

    • Elmer

      Jack first of all let me say just how unrefreshing it is to hear that “Drill Baby Drill” has been changed by Newt to “Drill Here, Drill Now”… yeech.

      I already hated Newt, and knew he was an idiot, but to see this being pushed at a time when drilling offshore is simply not needed due to the recent advances in onshore Shale Drilling like the Barnett Shale in Texas.

      There have also been numerous other recently announced shale deposits that covers most of the east coast there simply is very little reason to assume the dangers of drilling off shore are still needed.

      try to read a little about natural gas and recent developments in the last decade before being drawn into a political debate by the likes of Newt Gingrich who very seldom has an intelligent thought, or one that benefits anyone outside his home state of Georgia.

  • Jack Birch

    Newt Gingrich is promoting a petition, “Drill here, Drill Now, Pay Less”. I think we have more off-shore natural gas than we can use my lifetime, my kids lifetime, and my grandkids lifetime and all we have to do sink the wells and get it. If the scientists that theorize that the reason ships and airplanes sink in the Bermuda Triangle is because of gas bubbles released from the ocean floor causing a lack of buoyancy than there is an abundant supply that needs to be tapped. But lets not stop there but lets tap the whole Atlantic and Pacific coast. Lets stop OPEC before we leave ourselves open to be blackmailed by a bunch of terrorist creeps. If we can get enough petitions to Congress, hopefully we can change their bull-headed stance and allow the drilling to proceed.

    To suddenly shift to natural gas vehicles isn’t realistic. There isn’t enough natural gas available. But we can start phasing in and as one comment writer stated we may blend into using hydrogen.

  • Mike

    Australia has huge supplies of Natural Gas which it sells to China at a lower price tham it pays OPEC for petroleum. You cannot buy a natural gas car in Australia,or even a 100mpg Toyota or Volkswagen.Secondand Japanese cars are allowed as long as they are on the Government approved list and were built before 1988. Although there is said to be no collusion between government,car makers and fuel companies you are free to buy the car you want as long as it meets government rules -which don’t favour the buyer especially if you are trying to use less fuel. All substances used for fuel are subject to a 38cents a litre tax plus other taxes if you pay anybody for them.

    • http://Web Rand

      Wrong Mike,
      My Son lives in Melbourn AU and drives a CNG car. CNG for cars is readily available at gas stations. Even Ford Australia is producing a line of CNG cars.

  • Mike

    Australia has huge supplies of Natural Gas which it sells to China at a lower price tham it pays OPEC for petroleum. You cannot buy a natural gas car in Australia,or even a 100mpg Toyota or Volkswagen.Secondand Japanese cars are allowed as long as they are on the Government approved list and were built before 1988. Although there is said to be no collusion between government,car makers and fuel companies you are free to buy the car you want as long as it meets government rules -which don’t favour the buyer especially if you are trying to use less fuel. All substances used for fuel are subject to a 38cents a litre tax plus other taxes if you pay anybody for them.

  • Fireman Joe

    I think we need to let the oil controling countrys know that we CAN excercise A choice. Making a MONOPOLY going away starts with one choice. ANY choice we make away from oil puts the speculators in a pinch. Maybe not the greatest pinch but again it is a step in the right direction and MUCH better than just buying a hybrid. I want to tell the Sheiks to kiss my A##.

  • Fireman Joe

    I think we need to let the oil controling countrys know that we CAN excercise A choice. Making a MONOPOLY going away starts with one choice. ANY choice we make away from oil puts the speculators in a pinch. Maybe not the greatest pinch but again it is a step in the right direction and MUCH better than just buying a hybrid. I want to tell the Sheiks to kiss my A##.

  • http://NGV Jeremy

    This is such a great vehicle. True there are some accessibility issues with owning a NGV, but for homeowners that have natural gas to their house there is a rather large convienance factor. Secondly for every NGV purchased there is less oil required by us. As the numbers have shown we are just slightly a net importer of natural gas unlike oil. Therefor this has a much more possitive effect on our economy in that the money spent of fuel to operate a NGV would stay within the US economy and not go to some middle eastern governmen that funds terrorism. Also the markup price of the Civix GX is not nearly as bad as the markup on Hybrid’s such as the Prius, lessening the time it will take to make the car financially worth while. I think we shoould give Honda a huge thank you and even larger tax credit for building a car that has so many positive aspects!!!

  • Chip

    I drive an ’08 Civic GX and love it! In real life, I drive 3000-4000 miles a month. I am averaging in the low 40’s (miles per gas gallon equivalent). That includes running my a/c and driving up and down UTAH’s highways at a rate of 70+ mph. The worst fuel economy I’ve yet to experience was in the mid 30’s. At $.638/gge, I’m not complaining! At 75 mph the engine is running a hair below 2500rpm. At 80 mph a hair above 2500 rpm. Bravo,HONDA! Bravo!!

  • Chip

    I drive an ’08 Civic GX and love it! In real life, I drive 3000-4000 miles a month. I am averaging in the low 40’s (miles per gas gallon equivalent). That includes running my a/c and driving up and down UTAH’s highways at a rate of 70+ mph. The worst fuel economy I’ve yet to experience was in the mid 30’s. At $.638/gge, I’m not complaining! At 75 mph the engine is running a hair below 2500rpm. At 80 mph a hair above 2500 rpm. Bravo,HONDA! Bravo!!

  • daniel

    Things have changed since the studies cited–mostly in the last 3 years. With the advent of new technologies and a higher price environment, the industry is able to drill and produce in and from shales economically–making U.S. reserves much, much larger than those estimates. Just look at U.S. natural gas companies’ stocks.

  • daniel

    Things have changed since the studies cited–mostly in the last 3 years. With the advent of new technologies and a higher price environment, the industry is able to drill and produce in and from shales economically–making U.S. reserves much, much larger than those estimates. Just look at U.S. natural gas companies’ stocks.

  • dan

    I have a few questions regarding natural gas vehicles…

    How does the power of the natural gas Honda compare to that of the gasoline burning version?

    I own a 2000 Lexus RX300. If I’m able to convert this vehicle to NG, will my towing capacity change?

    Where can I get a conversion kit?

    Could a Prius or similar hybrid be converted to natural gas?

  • dan

    I have a few questions regarding natural gas vehicles…

    How does the power of the natural gas Honda compare to that of the gasoline burning version?

    I own a 2000 Lexus RX300. If I’m able to convert this vehicle to NG, will my towing capacity change?

    Where can I get a conversion kit?

    Could a Prius or similar hybrid be converted to natural gas?

  • Jack Landry

    As others have pointed out, the supply of natural gas goes well beyond the 11.5 years calculated by the author. US proved reserves have increased every year since 1998. According to the US Energy Information Administration, the US has an estimated 1,190.62 Tcf of recoverable natural gas — enough to supply US energy needs well into the future.

  • Jack Landry

    As others have pointed out, the supply of natural gas goes well beyond the 11.5 years calculated by the author. US proved reserves have increased every year since 1998. According to the US Energy Information Administration, the US has an estimated 1,190.62 Tcf of recoverable natural gas — enough to supply US energy needs well into the future.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Jack:

    I’d love to see a citation (link) for that number. At current consumptions rates (21.6 Tcf / year), that gives us 55 years of natural gas left, assuming there is no major increase usage.

    I could be wrong about the total estimated reserves, but we’re still just arguing about timeframe here. If natural gas is going to run out at some point, it doesn’t really matter how long we’ve got, just whether or not it’s useful as a bridge technology.

    http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/ng/ng_enr_sum_dcu_NUS_a.htm

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Jack:

    I’d love to see a citation (link) for that number. At current consumptions rates (21.6 Tcf / year), that gives us 55 years of natural gas left, assuming there is no major increase usage.

    I could be wrong about the total estimated reserves, but we’re still just arguing about timeframe here. If natural gas is going to run out at some point, it doesn’t really matter how long we’ve got, just whether or not it’s useful as a bridge technology.

    http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/ng/ng_enr_sum_dcu_NUS_a.htm

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Here’s something new:

    “According to EIA, worldwide demand for natural gas will increase by 52 percent from 2005 to 2030.”

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/oil.html

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Here’s something new:

    “According to EIA, worldwide demand for natural gas will increase by 52 percent from 2005 to 2030.”

    http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/ieo/oil.html

  • Merlin

    We won’t be making any “progress” in the energy sector UNTIL we learn how to use energy without burning something, or just creating heat like so called nuclear energy does. For all the high tech components of Nuclear energy all we really do is boil water for steam to run a turbine and how high tech is that?

    The world around us and the space beyond offers us a plethora of options for using its energy to do mechanical work, which is what we are really looking right now; producing heat is easy. So what is the problem we face? The answer of course is the greedy hand of Capitalism that is ever held out demanding tribute and always what is beyond reasonable. We need to start asking ourselves, our entire culture, how much is enough; especially for one person? I mean exactly how much luxury does any individual really need in their daily life? And even in business why must the goal always be more? What is wrong with attaining a reasonable level and accepting it as enough? Ponder that for a while before you answer.

  • Merlin

    We won’t be making any “progress” in the energy sector UNTIL we learn how to use energy without burning something, or just creating heat like so called nuclear energy does. For all the high tech components of Nuclear energy all we really do is boil water for steam to run a turbine and how high tech is that?

    The world around us and the space beyond offers us a plethora of options for using its energy to do mechanical work, which is what we are really looking right now; producing heat is easy. So what is the problem we face? The answer of course is the greedy hand of Capitalism that is ever held out demanding tribute and always what is beyond reasonable. We need to start asking ourselves, our entire culture, how much is enough; especially for one person? I mean exactly how much luxury does any individual really need in their daily life? And even in business why must the goal always be more? What is wrong with attaining a reasonable level and accepting it as enough? Ponder that for a while before you answer.

  • pantelis

    it all sounds great but we have to reach into the american ego first. people love their mustangs ,f-250s,expeditions,hummers etc etc etc.not to mention the rich and famous cars like bentleys,ferraris etc etc etc .

    tax the gas guslers and use the money for alternative energy sources.

  • pantelis

    it all sounds great but we have to reach into the american ego first. people love their mustangs ,f-250s,expeditions,hummers etc etc etc.not to mention the rich and famous cars like bentleys,ferraris etc etc etc .

    tax the gas guslers and use the money for alternative energy sources.

  • James A Brown

    Why don’t Ford, GM and Chrysler use LNG (liquid natural gas)in their vehicles. It seems to be a pretty safe alternative source of fuel that is being processed today.

  • James A Brown

    Why don’t Ford, GM and Chrysler use LNG (liquid natural gas)in their vehicles. It seems to be a pretty safe alternative source of fuel that is being processed today.

  • John

    seems a waste to me prices are almost the same as gas in connecticut and that was a 30day old price

    as far as an explosion. the local utils have been using them for years in small office cars, ie ford escort for cng comes to mind..

    I wouldnt call it an explosion. with the amount of change going on i doubt he could blow his nose…

  • John

    seems a waste to me prices are almost the same as gas in connecticut and that was a 30day old price

    as far as an explosion. the local utils have been using them for years in small office cars, ie ford escort for cng comes to mind..

    I wouldnt call it an explosion. with the amount of change going on i doubt he could blow his nose…

  • http://www.atticjewelry.com Kyle B

    Back in the 70’s was working as mud logger in Anadarko basin (Oklahoma) The rig was drilling at about 5 miles deep. The well hit a very high-pressure formation. http://www.ghkco.com/html/basin.htm has some info on their green #1. I also read that an over 5-mile well in Siberia also hit high-pressure gas. Technically these wells are below “bedrock” where there is no sedimentary formation source for oil/gas to be present for classical view of how a formation receives its oil/gas. In other words, this formation does not have a source of oil/gas below it that charges it with oil/gas. From what GHK is saying in the link above there is a vast amount of natural gas that isn’t being listed in the proven/proved reserves of natural gas in the U. S., I also worked a well near Weatherford Ok. that was drilled in the 30’s. It was producing at 100 PSI. They did a Frac Job on it and had 50,000-PSI coming out of the drill hole. I personally sat on the well that night and sent 1-million scf natural gas down the sales line. An hour after I left the site the well blew out because the next operator didn’t flush the mud from the separator. Separator clogged with mud, well head/80,000 PSI blowout preventors blew, parts found half a mile away. This was about 4 months before the Penn Square bank failure. Point is in Oklahoma I know of 2 vast reservoirs that aren’t being mentioned in the current discussions.

  • http://www.atticjewelry.com Kyle B

    Back in the 70’s was working as mud logger in Anadarko basin (Oklahoma) The rig was drilling at about 5 miles deep. The well hit a very high-pressure formation. http://www.ghkco.com/html/basin.htm has some info on their green #1. I also read that an over 5-mile well in Siberia also hit high-pressure gas. Technically these wells are below “bedrock” where there is no sedimentary formation source for oil/gas to be present for classical view of how a formation receives its oil/gas. In other words, this formation does not have a source of oil/gas below it that charges it with oil/gas. From what GHK is saying in the link above there is a vast amount of natural gas that isn’t being listed in the proven/proved reserves of natural gas in the U. S., I also worked a well near Weatherford Ok. that was drilled in the 30’s. It was producing at 100 PSI. They did a Frac Job on it and had 50,000-PSI coming out of the drill hole. I personally sat on the well that night and sent 1-million scf natural gas down the sales line. An hour after I left the site the well blew out because the next operator didn’t flush the mud from the separator. Separator clogged with mud, well head/80,000 PSI blowout preventors blew, parts found half a mile away. This was about 4 months before the Penn Square bank failure. Point is in Oklahoma I know of 2 vast reservoirs that aren’t being mentioned in the current discussions.

  • M J Remec

    The MULTIFUEL INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE, MICE, has an approximately 30% better thermal efficiency than the present gas engines. That means that if all gas engines could be converted to MICE in say five years, the oil consumption would drop by 39%, without any other changes. Details: 708.447.1257 and ask about MICE. No obligations!

  • M J Remec

    The MULTIFUEL INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE, MICE, has an approximately 30% better thermal efficiency than the present gas engines. That means that if all gas engines could be converted to MICE in say five years, the oil consumption would drop by 39%, without any other changes. Details: 708.447.1257 and ask about MICE. No obligations!

  • Donna

    I saw the movie “Who Killed the Electric Car.” That seemed like a great alternative. Why isn’t someone pursuing that?

  • Donna

    I saw the movie “Who Killed the Electric Car.” That seemed like a great alternative. Why isn’t someone pursuing that?

  • Dale

    Why is this vehicle be avaailable in only two states? Do the other states pedal and walk to their destination?

  • Dale

    Why is this vehicle be avaailable in only two states? Do the other states pedal and walk to their destination?

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  • DA

    Actually, the “Air Car” is the cleanest car on earth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmqpGZv0YT4 – (i.e., compressed air that can actually be recycled back into the tank).

  • DA

    Actually, the “Air Car” is the cleanest car on earth http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmqpGZv0YT4 – (i.e., compressed air that can actually be recycled back into the tank).

  • Jim Wilkins

    I have wondered for years why there was so little interest in the US in using CNG to fuel cars and trucks. For some reason there is more interest in propane than CNG.

    Regarding the combination of CNG and battery power, a hybrid, I have seen very little about the problems of battery replacement in hybrids. Toyota says a new battery pack for their Prius costs $3,000.00 PLUS LABOR. May be more than $4K by the time you are done. Also, what about disposal of the old battery pack? Are there any environmental concerns about that yet? Will there be?

  • Jim Wilkins

    I have wondered for years why there was so little interest in the US in using CNG to fuel cars and trucks. For some reason there is more interest in propane than CNG.

    Regarding the combination of CNG and battery power, a hybrid, I have seen very little about the problems of battery replacement in hybrids. Toyota says a new battery pack for their Prius costs $3,000.00 PLUS LABOR. May be more than $4K by the time you are done. Also, what about disposal of the old battery pack? Are there any environmental concerns about that yet? Will there be?

  • http://Whoknows?? Max

    You ask, “Tell us what you think”. ‘I think’ that I must be one of the stupidest people in the game because I can’t seem to get into a street and then out of it again with some newly picked up knowledge.

    Not unlike a myriad of sites, when I am trying to find the price of shovels I get information about pool tables or salted crackers.

  • Clifferd Lee

    I’ve seen a car that ran on compressed air, I think it was out of France and they have been ten years developing this concept and have several vehicles to boot. What are your views on compressed air-Engines

  • Clifferd Lee

    I’ve seen a car that ran on compressed air, I think it was out of France and they have been ten years developing this concept and have several vehicles to boot. What are your views on compressed air-Engines

  • Bill Baitzel

    I was a former Instructor for the Honda Gx. I live in the New York area whwere if half the drivers took there second car and made it a Honda GX and used the home fueling station there would be a major drop in natioal fuel use and price. I have tried to push this idea for three years and no one wants to listen. I will be happy to help you in anyway I can with this idea. The GX is a 300,000 mile car. It is a win win idea.

  • Bill Baitzel

    I was a former Instructor for the Honda Gx. I live in the New York area whwere if half the drivers took there second car and made it a Honda GX and used the home fueling station there would be a major drop in natioal fuel use and price. I have tried to push this idea for three years and no one wants to listen. I will be happy to help you in anyway I can with this idea. The GX is a 300,000 mile car. It is a win win idea.

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  • walters

    There are some very serious drawbacks to this vehicle. The creativity of the individuals designing these vehicles should be commended but natural gas simply will not cut it, there is not enough available to the United States. Also we have yet to replace the diesel which the United States economy is clearly based. Crushing coal would be a much more feasible solution for short term energy problems, particularly in the area of diesel. This would give us time to find a cleaner long term solution. This problem though is not that of the government though, they cannot control the foreign speculation that has been going on outside our borders which is responsible for 25-50% percent of the oil costs/gss costs. This is both a short term and long term problem and it must be attacked in that way.

  • walters

    There are some very serious drawbacks to this vehicle. The creativity of the individuals designing these vehicles should be commended but natural gas simply will not cut it, there is not enough available to the United States. Also we have yet to replace the diesel which the United States economy is clearly based. Crushing coal would be a much more feasible solution for short term energy problems, particularly in the area of diesel. This would give us time to find a cleaner long term solution. This problem though is not that of the government though, they cannot control the foreign speculation that has been going on outside our borders which is responsible for 25-50% percent of the oil costs/gss costs. This is both a short term and long term problem and it must be attacked in that way.

  • Josh

    Joe, hydrogen cars are of two sorts; thse that burn it, and those the through a form of reverse electrolosis create water vapor. Burning hydrogen does not create water vapor.

  • Josh

    Joe, hydrogen cars are of two sorts; thse that burn it, and those the through a form of reverse electrolosis create water vapor. Burning hydrogen does not create water vapor.

  • http://www.our-green-planet.com Brad

    Wouldn’t it be a better investment of time and money to advance technology with zero emissions? If we can supply our power grid in the U.S. with solar and wind power and advance “plug in” vehicle technology wouldn’t we then be 100% green? I just hate to think that we’re going down the same old path of eventually being dependant on foreign energy and our natural gas goes to $4.00.

  • http://www.our-green-planet.com Brad

    Wouldn’t it be a better investment of time and money to advance technology with zero emissions? If we can supply our power grid in the U.S. with solar and wind power and advance “plug in” vehicle technology wouldn’t we then be 100% green? I just hate to think that we’re going down the same old path of eventually being dependant on foreign energy and our natural gas goes to $4.00.

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  • Art Modgling

    This all sounds good, but in the meantime we need to Drill, Drill, Drill. We can drill our way out of this, we should have done so 30 years ago. I also do not want windmills every where. These new things will take 15 to 20 years to come about, in the meantime we must use what we have OIL.

  • Art Modgling

    This all sounds good, but in the meantime we need to Drill, Drill, Drill. We can drill our way out of this, we should have done so 30 years ago. I also do not want windmills every where. These new things will take 15 to 20 years to come about, in the meantime we must use what we have OIL.

  • Jim

    What about the new clean diesels coming out? We can do this today. You get 20-40% better efficiency and the motors last forever. Don’t need anything to do this, just fill it up. VW is making affordable cars now for this.

  • Jim

    What about the new clean diesels coming out? We can do this today. You get 20-40% better efficiency and the motors last forever. Don’t need anything to do this, just fill it up. VW is making affordable cars now for this.

  • Chris

    I have not heard anyone here talk about re-sale of alternative technology vehicles. One key aspect of car economics is the relatively secure market to re-sell your vehicle for whatever reason (personally I hang on to mine for 10+ years).

    If you paid out 24K for this car, what’s the chance that in 5 years its not a dinosaur?

    Could its powertrain be easily converted to hydrogen, if H becomes the fuel of choice?

  • Chris

    I have not heard anyone here talk about re-sale of alternative technology vehicles. One key aspect of car economics is the relatively secure market to re-sell your vehicle for whatever reason (personally I hang on to mine for 10+ years).

    If you paid out 24K for this car, what’s the chance that in 5 years its not a dinosaur?

    Could its powertrain be easily converted to hydrogen, if H becomes the fuel of choice?

  • William R. Birchall

    Weel now….If all these fun things are to be implemented, how do we get started? I hear all this talk but see little do. Tomorrow would be nice for us old farts that don’t expect to live for more than 5 or 10 years more, Giddyap!

    B

  • William R. Birchall

    Weel now….If all these fun things are to be implemented, how do we get started? I hear all this talk but see little do. Tomorrow would be nice for us old farts that don’t expect to live for more than 5 or 10 years more, Giddyap!

    B

  • mel

    My sister lives in Georgia and said the cost for her natural gas appliances have tripled in the last four years. She is seriously thinking about switching back to electricity. Perhaps the cost in Utah is 63 cents NOW but what would the cost be on the Left Coast or New York?

  • mel

    My sister lives in Georgia and said the cost for her natural gas appliances have tripled in the last four years. She is seriously thinking about switching back to electricity. Perhaps the cost in Utah is 63 cents NOW but what would the cost be on the Left Coast or New York?

  • LDC

    Electricity is really the answer. All of these other options are intriguing, but you need fueling stations that sell and supply different competing fuels, not to mention the industries that produce them. This follows the gasoline marketing paradigm. You will see multiple “middle-men” getting in line to run up the cost before it reaches the consumer. We need a break from this old school way of delivering energy. Energy needs to be delivered to the consumer with the fewest layers of separation.

    Does anyone remember Betamax? I’d hate to be the guy who buys a alternate fuel vehicle and then watches it become obsolete when the forces of the market place squelch the less profitable fuel industries.

    You need to focus on the common denominator. It’s clearly electricity. Every energy source that we have available (fossil, renewable, or nuclear) can be easily used to produce electricity with our existing infrastructure. It also allows for integration of future discoveries. Distribution is easy. We all have access to a power source. We’ll need to invest in our grid, but we need to do that anyway.

    As previously noted by other comments, our demand will inevitably exceed our supply when it comes to carbon based fuel. We’ll then be back to this situation again. Hydrogen doesn’t make sense. Why use electricity to make hydrogen, so that we can burn it in our cars? Why not simply use the electricity to power the vehicle in the first place? The emissions are comparable, the safety issues are negligible in comparison, and there is significant energy loss in production and distribution of hydrogen. Natural gas provides a reasonable short term solution, but we need to keep our eyes on the ball. When it comes to ground transportation, the internal combustion engine will eventually go the way of the dodo.

  • LDC

    Electricity is really the answer. All of these other options are intriguing, but you need fueling stations that sell and supply different competing fuels, not to mention the industries that produce them. This follows the gasoline marketing paradigm. You will see multiple “middle-men” getting in line to run up the cost before it reaches the consumer. We need a break from this old school way of delivering energy. Energy needs to be delivered to the consumer with the fewest layers of separation.

    Does anyone remember Betamax? I’d hate to be the guy who buys a alternate fuel vehicle and then watches it become obsolete when the forces of the market place squelch the less profitable fuel industries.

    You need to focus on the common denominator. It’s clearly electricity. Every energy source that we have available (fossil, renewable, or nuclear) can be easily used to produce electricity with our existing infrastructure. It also allows for integration of future discoveries. Distribution is easy. We all have access to a power source. We’ll need to invest in our grid, but we need to do that anyway.

    As previously noted by other comments, our demand will inevitably exceed our supply when it comes to carbon based fuel. We’ll then be back to this situation again. Hydrogen doesn’t make sense. Why use electricity to make hydrogen, so that we can burn it in our cars? Why not simply use the electricity to power the vehicle in the first place? The emissions are comparable, the safety issues are negligible in comparison, and there is significant energy loss in production and distribution of hydrogen. Natural gas provides a reasonable short term solution, but we need to keep our eyes on the ball. When it comes to ground transportation, the internal combustion engine will eventually go the way of the dodo.

  • Rman

    The true is that american car companies do not want their cars to run on NG… main reason an auto that runs on NG virtually has no ware on its components. The carbon residue is clean compare to petroleum distillates so good by engine work. I have seen the change of oil on a NG engine and the old oil still looks likes honey.

  • Rman

    The true is that american car companies do not want their cars to run on NG… main reason an auto that runs on NG virtually has no ware on its components. The carbon residue is clean compare to petroleum distillates so good by engine work. I have seen the change of oil on a NG engine and the old oil still looks likes honey.

  • charles knowles

    How can we help get this done in Florida???

  • charles knowles

    How can we help get this done in Florida???

  • Jonathan

    Convertint to natrual gas doesnt seem like a bad problem at all. My Parents just changed their oil furnace to gas jusc recientally. but the conversions shouldnt stop just there. I remember not to long ago i was watching on Discovery channel Modern Marvels or something a show on Green Technologies and one that really caught my interest was: Families are choosing now to bury compressor coils more then 6 feet under ground to use as a heat-exchanger to supplement a natural gas burner for winter and air-conditioner for summer. The purpose of burrying the coil underground 6+ feet is that due to the warm earth its at a constant tempreature year round and it can just help make up the difference. As well as using Solar water heaters on the roofs of houses to supplment water heaters. Possibly if those items become a part of mass usage the government can include tax credits on those also.

  • Jonathan

    Convertint to natrual gas doesnt seem like a bad problem at all. My Parents just changed their oil furnace to gas jusc recientally. but the conversions shouldnt stop just there. I remember not to long ago i was watching on Discovery channel Modern Marvels or something a show on Green Technologies and one that really caught my interest was: Families are choosing now to bury compressor coils more then 6 feet under ground to use as a heat-exchanger to supplement a natural gas burner for winter and air-conditioner for summer. The purpose of burrying the coil underground 6+ feet is that due to the warm earth its at a constant tempreature year round and it can just help make up the difference. As well as using Solar water heaters on the roofs of houses to supplment water heaters. Possibly if those items become a part of mass usage the government can include tax credits on those also.

  • Terry Wallace

    There appears to be a place for natural gas as a partial solution to our energy crisis. History suggests there is no one perfect choice for most situations. But let us not forget that we need to do all we can to mitigate our dependence on foreign oil. The transfer of wealth out of this country has to be in the long run as harmful to the standard of living in this country as green house gases in the short term. We need to do all we can and right now!

    The US needs technologies that can implemented right now, natural appears to be ready for today. Tomorrow

    we will have “more perfect solutions”. I want more US dollars staying home!

  • Terry Wallace

    There appears to be a place for natural gas as a partial solution to our energy crisis. History suggests there is no one perfect choice for most situations. But let us not forget that we need to do all we can to mitigate our dependence on foreign oil. The transfer of wealth out of this country has to be in the long run as harmful to the standard of living in this country as green house gases in the short term. We need to do all we can and right now!

    The US needs technologies that can implemented right now, natural appears to be ready for today. Tomorrow

    we will have “more perfect solutions”. I want more US dollars staying home!

  • Ken Gallie

    I saw the plans for the hydrogen engine back in 85, and that time I thought it would be the answer. I believe if we put a concentrated effort, and a lot of money behind the project. It would work for the masses. Problem, is that is still difficult to charge for water, However I was the one who thought water bottling companies would never stay in business. Go fiquire.

    If we could put a man on the moon with 60’s technology, there is nothing we cannot do if as a nation we focus.

    I see both ethanol, and Natural gas as only temp fixes, maybe we need to create a national mandate to leap ahead, and make cars run on hydrogen,and maybe we would see smog as a thing of the past.

  • Ken Gallie

    I saw the plans for the hydrogen engine back in 85, and that time I thought it would be the answer. I believe if we put a concentrated effort, and a lot of money behind the project. It would work for the masses. Problem, is that is still difficult to charge for water, However I was the one who thought water bottling companies would never stay in business. Go fiquire.

    If we could put a man on the moon with 60’s technology, there is nothing we cannot do if as a nation we focus.

    I see both ethanol, and Natural gas as only temp fixes, maybe we need to create a national mandate to leap ahead, and make cars run on hydrogen,and maybe we would see smog as a thing of the past.

  • Ken Gallie

    I saw the plans for the hydrogen engine back in 85, and that time I thought it would be the answer. I believe if we put a concentrated effort, and a lot of money behind the project. It would work for the masses. Problem, is that is still difficult to charge for water, However I was the one who thought water bottling companies would never stay in business. Go fiquire.

    If we could put a man on the moon with 60’s technology, there is nothing we cannot do if as a nation we focus.

    I see both ethanol, and Natural gas as only temp fixes, maybe we need to create a national mandate to leap ahead, and make cars run on hydrogen,and maybe we would see smog as a thing of the past.

  • Justin M.

    Regarding the explosive potential of either fuel, gasoline has a much lower flash point than natural gas. Gasoline will explode (flash point) at 250 degrees Fahrenheit as opposed to 1100 degrees Fahrenheit for natural gas. Which sounds more explosive to you?

  • Justin M.

    Regarding the explosive potential of either fuel, gasoline has a much lower flash point than natural gas. Gasoline will explode (flash point) at 250 degrees Fahrenheit as opposed to 1100 degrees Fahrenheit for natural gas. Which sounds more explosive to you?

  • http://www.wshu.org Ng Diem

    Pickens owns gazillions of cubic feet of natural gas.

  • http://www.wshu.org Ng Diem

    Pickens owns gazillions of cubic feet of natural gas.

  • http://www.wshu.org Ng Diem

    Pickens owns gazillions of cubic feet of natural gas.

  • http://www.wshu.org Ng Diem

    Pickens has alot of gas to sell.

  • http://www.wshu.org Ng Diem

    Pickens has alot of gas to sell.

  • http://allautomobile.blogspot.com htbw

    Liquified natural gas for cars is nothing new. This has been on the market for well over 20 years and several vehicles were converted to run on it.

    As far as Clayton’s comment “Most of the sources say that because natural gas doesn’t pool as a liquid, but instead immediately evaporates, that it’s less likely to ignite.”

    Fuels do not egnite as a liquid. They need to be brought to a gasious stage first. Hence the term “Flash Point.” This is the temperature a fuels has to be at before it will ignite. Pretty much the same temperature required to convert that liquid to a gas.

    As for whether your car will explode or not, I guess as long as you don’t go the French route and put your tank behind the rear bumper….

    http://allautomobile.blogspot.com

  • http://allautomobile.blogspot.com htbw

    Liquified natural gas for cars is nothing new. This has been on the market for well over 20 years and several vehicles were converted to run on it.

    As far as Clayton’s comment “Most of the sources say that because natural gas doesn’t pool as a liquid, but instead immediately evaporates, that it’s less likely to ignite.”

    Fuels do not egnite as a liquid. They need to be brought to a gasious stage first. Hence the term “Flash Point.” This is the temperature a fuels has to be at before it will ignite. Pretty much the same temperature required to convert that liquid to a gas.

    As for whether your car will explode or not, I guess as long as you don’t go the French route and put your tank behind the rear bumper….

    http://allautomobile.blogspot.com

  • http://allautomobile.blogspot.com htbw

    Liquified natural gas for cars is nothing new. This has been on the market for well over 20 years and several vehicles were converted to run on it.

    As far as Clayton’s comment “Most of the sources say that because natural gas doesn’t pool as a liquid, but instead immediately evaporates, that it’s less likely to ignite.”

    Fuels do not egnite as a liquid. They need to be brought to a gasious stage first. Hence the term “Flash Point.” This is the temperature a fuels has to be at before it will ignite. Pretty much the same temperature required to convert that liquid to a gas.

    As for whether your car will explode or not, I guess as long as you don’t go the French route and put your tank behind the rear bumper….

    http://allautomobile.blogspot.com

  • http://www.ngvdrivers.com&www.cngchat.com Mike A.

    The article incorrectly states that the Civic GX is only available for sale in NY and CA. My local Honda dealer (Joe Marina Honda) in Tulsa, OK has been selling and servicing the Civic GX ever since it was introduced by Honda in 1998. The salesman who specializes in the GX at Joe Marina Honda currently has about 75 people who have paid a $500 deposit and signed a contract to buy a GX when they arrive. Honda can’t make as many of these as they can sell. Honda reported record profits last quarter; Ford reported a $8+ billion loss last quarter. Honda pays attention to the trends, so they’re seeing the payoff. American car companies only give lip service to progress on alternative fuels for PR purposes, so they’re missing out. I’ve been sending emails to GM, Ford, and Chrysler for about a years trying to encourage them to bring back the CNG models they used to sell. Not only have they not done it, but they don’t care enough to even respond to my emails. Because of their leaders’ incompetence, I don’t feel sorry for them for losing so much money. I hope our government doesn’t bail them out if they fail. We need to leave the proper risk/rewards in place to encourage car companies to do the right thing for consumers and the environment.

  • http://www.ngvdrivers.com Mike A.

    By the way, I own a 2007 Honda Civic GX (purchased 8/07) as well as a 2000 Ford Contour SE CNG/gasoline bifuel 4-door car.

  • http://www.ngvdrivers.com Mike A.

    By the way, I own a 2007 Honda Civic GX (purchased 8/07) as well as a 2000 Ford Contour SE CNG/gasoline bifuel 4-door car.

  • Patricia Kerns

    I have a question. Did the Chicago stcokyards ever

    provide methane gas to the city for lights, cooking

    and heating? If this thought is true, I am remembering it from 7th or 8th geography class. I am

    approaching 80 years of age. Anyone out there have

    the same memory?

  • Patricia Kerns

    I have a question. Did the Chicago stcokyards ever

    provide methane gas to the city for lights, cooking

    and heating? If this thought is true, I am remembering it from 7th or 8th geography class. I am

    approaching 80 years of age. Anyone out there have

    the same memory?

  • Patricia Kerns

    I have a question. Did the Chicago stcokyards ever

    provide methane gas to the city for lights, cooking

    and heating? If this thought is true, I am remembering it from 7th or 8th geography class. I am

    approaching 80 years of age. Anyone out there have

    the same memory?

  • Luis Figueroa

    I have been working as a U.S. contractor in Colombia for the past five years. In Colombia, many cities (more abundantly in the Caribbean coast) have dozens of CNG public stations. A large number of taxis and public buses run on CNG. It is amazing to me that in the U.S. we don’t do the same! I will look into opening my own CNG public station back home. That is, if the government doesn’t swamp me with infinite restrictions to do so…

  • Luis Figueroa

    I have been working as a U.S. contractor in Colombia for the past five years. In Colombia, many cities (more abundantly in the Caribbean coast) have dozens of CNG public stations. A large number of taxis and public buses run on CNG. It is amazing to me that in the U.S. we don’t do the same! I will look into opening my own CNG public station back home. That is, if the government doesn’t swamp me with infinite restrictions to do so…

  • Luis Figueroa

    I have been working as a U.S. contractor in Colombia for the past five years. In Colombia, many cities (more abundantly in the Caribbean coast) have dozens of CNG public stations. A large number of taxis and public buses run on CNG. It is amazing to me that in the U.S. we don’t do the same! I will look into opening my own CNG public station back home. That is, if the government doesn’t swamp me with infinite restrictions to do so…

  • Luis Figueroa

    I have been working as a U.S. contractor in Colombia for the past five years. In Colombia, many cities (more abundantly in the Caribbean coast) have dozens of CNG public stations. A large number of taxis and public buses run on CNG. It is amazing to me that in the U.S. we don’t do the same! I will look into opening my own CNG public station back home. That is, if the government doesn’t swamp me with infinite restrictions to do so…

  • Keith W

    Jack is correct about the revised amount of natural gas available. What has changed is a combination of new technology and new discovery of huge amounts of gas from profitably recoverable gas shales such as the Barnett, Marcellus, and now the apparently largest Haynesville shale. Chesapeake Energy has predicted that the Haynesville Shale located in Northwest Louisiana alone has 245 Tcf of recoverable gas. A bi-fuel vehicle,CNG and flex-fuel could be a great solution. A small CNG tank could provide for about 50+ miles to work and back with the liquid fuel for longer trips. This would be similar to the Chevy VOLT concept of using the grid supplied battery power for the first 40 miles each day.

  • Keith W

    Jack is correct about the revised amount of natural gas available. What has changed is a combination of new technology and new discovery of huge amounts of gas from profitably recoverable gas shales such as the Barnett, Marcellus, and now the apparently largest Haynesville shale. Chesapeake Energy has predicted that the Haynesville Shale located in Northwest Louisiana alone has 245 Tcf of recoverable gas. A bi-fuel vehicle,CNG and flex-fuel could be a great solution. A small CNG tank could provide for about 50+ miles to work and back with the liquid fuel for longer trips. This would be similar to the Chevy VOLT concept of using the grid supplied battery power for the first 40 miles each day.

  • Keith W

    Jack is correct about the revised amount of natural gas available. What has changed is a combination of new technology and new discovery of huge amounts of gas from profitably recoverable gas shales such as the Barnett, Marcellus, and now the apparently largest Haynesville shale. Chesapeake Energy has predicted that the Haynesville Shale located in Northwest Louisiana alone has 245 Tcf of recoverable gas. A bi-fuel vehicle,CNG and flex-fuel could be a great solution. A small CNG tank could provide for about 50+ miles to work and back with the liquid fuel for longer trips. This would be similar to the Chevy VOLT concept of using the grid supplied battery power for the first 40 miles each day.

  • James Welch

    If we really want our planet to have clean air, lets be real. Electric cars are the answer for the general public. I still have are hard time dealing with the fact that took away the EVA cars. I think thats what they were called.The documentary I saw about it SHOCKED me. All those cars being crushed because the oil and auto industries couldn’t deal with the lost of revenue. I wish the policy makers would answer to the people of this country as well as the industry that did this. thank you….

  • James Welch

    If we really want our planet to have clean air, lets be real. Electric cars are the answer for the general public. I still have are hard time dealing with the fact that took away the EVA cars. I think thats what they were called.The documentary I saw about it SHOCKED me. All those cars being crushed because the oil and auto industries couldn’t deal with the lost of revenue. I wish the policy makers would answer to the people of this country as well as the industry that did this. thank you….

  • Chris

    With natural gas reserve, you forgot a trillion cubic feet. http://www.naturalgas.org/overview/resources.asp

    And this number might not even reflect the natural gas trapped in all the shale formations.

  • Chris

    With natural gas reserve, you forgot a trillion cubic feet. http://www.naturalgas.org/overview/resources.asp

    And this number might not even reflect the natural gas trapped in all the shale formations.

  • http://jonalist.bravehost.com/Jonalist.html Charles Jones

    I would recommend that everyone desiring to create a business of converting a vehicle to another form of fuel supply consider, The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF). There are issues which should be the commanding solution for Banks, Loan Associations, and consumer’s, mainly resulting from how vehicles have been handled in payment processing. The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) at http://jonalist.bravehost.com/Jonalist.html is a unique project which would endorse every such operation in all states and be a free conversion. You really must read more about this project to fully understand how a warranty protects the consumer as well as the public from abuse of conversion as there are possible problems which result in people taking a unfair advantage of others from a converted vehicle such that they would establish a business of renting their vehicle to others at a profit. The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) would find them out and such warranty would be ended, their Grant which allowed the conversion would be invalid and state law enforcement could apprehend them and the vehicle confiscated immediately because without supporting the Grant Process a consumer is violating others rights whom are and the illegality issue they began by renting the vehicle in a business would be against the rules set forth in the Grant, loss of the Grant and the warranty makes the vehicle a threat to others whom are driving their vehicle with or without conversion so a lawsuit is not actually something The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) is willing to undertake to resolve issues created by those whom take advantage of others. Really it is a open shut case against those individuals and a warning is not a fair way to show others they are being protected, the state then has the advantage to cease the individuals drivers license and all insurance companies can refuse to sell that individual a insurance policy coverage from that day further which is saying a mouthful to those whom take advantage of others to not do that to their driving record. By all logical means this is the ultimate punishment a individual should experience, it is about as bad as driving off from a gas station without paying or stealing gasoline, where in some states a first offense is a fine of $500 and a second offense is also a fine of $500 plus forfeiture of their drivers license and their vehicle is towed in and ceased which results in a impoundments fee, and insurance coverage to get it back.

    Ethanol creation via corn a eatable crop is more likely to end once Genetics starts entering the fuel processing methods to consider, some of these genetic options are already heading to Brazil to begin processing and growth. Economical Flower Greenhouses are far more appealing than Pig Dung Processing Plants to produce Bio-Diesel and Flowers producing Ethanol would be sweeter. General Electric made a good consideration to create a Hydrogen Generator for running off the Power Grid. I figure that Genetically Altered Flowers being made capable to grow cellulose containing sugar would be the objective to have a high yield of Ethanol from bio-digester processes. We would need a super large building to accomplish this and we would have to end any Flower Sales based on keeping strict control of the Flower because of its Genetic Altercation. Ethanol would then become a produced fuel from Flowers and we could bring a limitation of its production through corn plus bring into the mix other sources for the bio-digestion to convert and this would conserve on having separate facilities for converting the plant materials to Ethanol. Therefore one or more conversion facilities could be created in each state.

    Alabama Gas has yet to announce their support for CGN and it could be that their controller Energen Corporation has more say in what Alabama Gas can do than Alabama Gas so the limited support given to this is because of this situation. It is a concern that consumer’s with a CNG Vehicle can own a Refill Station for their home, it is another concern that a thief can access their home and steal it or the Natural Gas and continue on their journey, but hereto the issue is that of making these units as a rental for a homeowner through their Gas Company so its use will be added to their billing statement each month. This can cause a issue to homeowners whom work for a employer that has a policy to give them fuel cost they incur during their employ. A home Refill station does no show whom is using the unit and how much is being used so the actual amount is skeptical in so much that a mans wife could also own a CNG Vehicle and use it as well as he whom is covered by his company policy. The final situation is that many homes do not have a connection that is without the need of installing requiring the Natural Gas Company to come out to the home to cut-off the Natural Gas Supply so a installer could install a connection for a Home Refill Station for a consumer. If a consumer needs this they should also consider whether or not they should have another connection for their barbecue grill and do that connection as well.

    Consumer’s have something else to be thankful for besides CNG Vehicles, a company now in China makes a CNG Bicycle and another company makes CNG lawnmowers, other companies make CNG motorcycles. It will not be long in waiting that companies will consider making CNG powered motor boats and two person water transport vehicles. This growing marketing field is bringing more job responsibilities to all Natural Gas Suppliers and people seeking jobs should always check that option for their livelihood. Their is another company whom is making the process of adding CNG and Hydrogen to their vehicle by changing a module which has the fuel in it instead and it also has a separate home refill option – . This is entirely new Product Architecture, Gas to Solid-State, is now offered by Limnia, Inc. more info here: http://www.limnia.com/

    The most widely talked about method of storing hydrogen is in pressurized tanks, where the gas is typically under pressure from 10,000 to 30,000 psi. Hydrogen pressurized in cylinders has limited storage capacity because of its low density. For electric vehicles, most tank-based systems average 100 to150 miles on one tank. Tank-based storage systems have other disadvantages too. “They’re problematic up and down. The tanks are so big, they take up a lot of space, and the re-fueling process can be dangerous because of the high pressure coming out of the pump,” said Redmond. What’s more, the limited storage capacity of the vehicles makes frequent re-fueling necessary, which means a lot of stations need to be built to keep this type of car running over a long distance. Limnia claims, “With our solid-state cassettes, you can drive 2,500 miles across America without ever turning off your engine. You can just hot-swap cassette modules,” said Redmond. Three cassettes in an electric car can take you 300 miles. “Fifteen companies have designed electric cars that can take you 600 miles on the same three cassettes,” said Redmond. The company’s cassettes, which also power homes, buildings, communities, data centers, and more, integrate board, box, safety, mounting, signal path, power path, shielding, I/O, sequencing, and support rail into a complete chassis system. Unlike conventional systems, Limnia uses a small pack of batteries as a supplement – the Battery Multiplex Array (BMA) massive Commodity-class battery pack. “The batteries are not direct to the motor. They are in between. The fuel cell is constantly recharging them, so we can get away with fewer batteries,” said Scott Redmond, Vice President of Product Architecture, Limnia, Inc.. Limnia’s system uses existing infrastructure to replace the cassettes, with drop-off and pick-up locations at UPS, FedEx, and Kinko’s. You can also have new fuel cassettes shipped to you through one of these carriers or US Mail, or simply re-fuel the cassettes in your home. A home pack, which comes with the system, re-charges the cassettes using two methods. The first is hydrolysis, which cracks the hydrogen. “If you electrocute water in a certain way with a certain type of salt, hydrogen bubbles out of the water. Limnia’s home pack uses the GE Noryl electrolyzer, which makes hydrogen cheaper than any other method out there – even gasoline,” said Redmond. The other way to produce hydrogen is via a microbial reactor. This consists of specially engineered bugs that eat waste to release hydrogen gas. Both sources of hydrogen are readily available. The home pack uses kitchen waste, as well as water to produce the hydrogen. Storage racks in the base of the unit hold charged cassettes for future use.

    What’s more, hydrogen powered appliances are now available in both the consumer and industrial markets, driven by improvements in the automotive industry. In cold weather environments, fuel cells can replace heating systems. According to Redmond, “There is a type of fuel cell for homes that runs hotter than it needs to run. Heat is piped off the fuel cell with water tubes that extend underneath the floor. With this type of system, there is no reason you need to be hooked up to a grid.” Initial cost of investment is high; however, Redmond said that over time, it pays for itself.

    “We’ve had a lot of data centers call us for battery-backup because the hydrogen fuel cells have a longer run time, no EMF, and no vibration,” said Redmond. Big buildings are also installing fuel cell systems. “In Silicone Valley a lot of the big Internet companies are having to move out because they cannot pull enough electricity to the building, but they can pull water and natural gas to the building, which you can crack to run the fuel cell,” he added.

    Many fuel cell systems are available for large factories and large industrial systems. They suit certain industries because they produce no vibration, no toxic fumes, and no outgassing. They also have a cleaner electrical signal, less failures, and almost no maintenance.

  • http://jonalist.bravehost.com/Jonalist.html Charles Jones

    I would recommend that everyone desiring to create a business of converting a vehicle to another form of fuel supply consider, The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF). There are issues which should be the commanding solution for Banks, Loan Associations, and consumer’s, mainly resulting from how vehicles have been handled in payment processing. The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) at http://jonalist.bravehost.com/Jonalist.html is a unique project which would endorse every such operation in all states and be a free conversion. You really must read more about this project to fully understand how a warranty protects the consumer as well as the public from abuse of conversion as there are possible problems which result in people taking a unfair advantage of others from a converted vehicle such that they would establish a business of renting their vehicle to others at a profit. The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) would find them out and such warranty would be ended, their Grant which allowed the conversion would be invalid and state law enforcement could apprehend them and the vehicle confiscated immediately because without supporting the Grant Process a consumer is violating others rights whom are and the illegality issue they began by renting the vehicle in a business would be against the rules set forth in the Grant, loss of the Grant and the warranty makes the vehicle a threat to others whom are driving their vehicle with or without conversion so a lawsuit is not actually something The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) is willing to undertake to resolve issues created by those whom take advantage of others. Really it is a open shut case against those individuals and a warning is not a fair way to show others they are being protected, the state then has the advantage to cease the individuals drivers license and all insurance companies can refuse to sell that individual a insurance policy coverage from that day further which is saying a mouthful to those whom take advantage of others to not do that to their driving record. By all logical means this is the ultimate punishment a individual should experience, it is about as bad as driving off from a gas station without paying or stealing gasoline, where in some states a first offense is a fine of $500 and a second offense is also a fine of $500 plus forfeiture of their drivers license and their vehicle is towed in and ceased which results in a impoundments fee, and insurance coverage to get it back.

    Ethanol creation via corn a eatable crop is more likely to end once Genetics starts entering the fuel processing methods to consider, some of these genetic options are already heading to Brazil to begin processing and growth. Economical Flower Greenhouses are far more appealing than Pig Dung Processing Plants to produce Bio-Diesel and Flowers producing Ethanol would be sweeter. General Electric made a good consideration to create a Hydrogen Generator for running off the Power Grid. I figure that Genetically Altered Flowers being made capable to grow cellulose containing sugar would be the objective to have a high yield of Ethanol from bio-digester processes. We would need a super large building to accomplish this and we would have to end any Flower Sales based on keeping strict control of the Flower because of its Genetic Altercation. Ethanol would then become a produced fuel from Flowers and we could bring a limitation of its production through corn plus bring into the mix other sources for the bio-digestion to convert and this would conserve on having separate facilities for converting the plant materials to Ethanol. Therefore one or more conversion facilities could be created in each state.

    Alabama Gas has yet to announce their support for CGN and it could be that their controller Energen Corporation has more say in what Alabama Gas can do than Alabama Gas so the limited support given to this is because of this situation. It is a concern that consumer’s with a CNG Vehicle can own a Refill Station for their home, it is another concern that a thief can access their home and steal it or the Natural Gas and continue on their journey, but hereto the issue is that of making these units as a rental for a homeowner through their Gas Company so its use will be added to their billing statement each month. This can cause a issue to homeowners whom work for a employer that has a policy to give them fuel cost they incur during their employ. A home Refill station does no show whom is using the unit and how much is being used so the actual amount is skeptical in so much that a mans wife could also own a CNG Vehicle and use it as well as he whom is covered by his company policy. The final situation is that many homes do not have a connection that is without the need of installing requiring the Natural Gas Company to come out to the home to cut-off the Natural Gas Supply so a installer could install a connection for a Home Refill Station for a consumer. If a consumer needs this they should also consider whether or not they should have another connection for their barbecue grill and do that connection as well.

    Consumer’s have something else to be thankful for besides CNG Vehicles, a company now in China makes a CNG Bicycle and another company makes CNG lawnmowers, other companies make CNG motorcycles. It will not be long in waiting that companies will consider making CNG powered motor boats and two person water transport vehicles. This growing marketing field is bringing more job responsibilities to all Natural Gas Suppliers and people seeking jobs should always check that option for their livelihood. Their is another company whom is making the process of adding CNG and Hydrogen to their vehicle by changing a module which has the fuel in it instead and it also has a separate home refill option – . This is entirely new Product Architecture, Gas to Solid-State, is now offered by Limnia, Inc. more info here: http://www.limnia.com/

    The most widely talked about method of storing hydrogen is in pressurized tanks, where the gas is typically under pressure from 10,000 to 30,000 psi. Hydrogen pressurized in cylinders has limited storage capacity because of its low density. For electric vehicles, most tank-based systems average 100 to150 miles on one tank. Tank-based storage systems have other disadvantages too. “They’re problematic up and down. The tanks are so big, they take up a lot of space, and the re-fueling process can be dangerous because of the high pressure coming out of the pump,” said Redmond. What’s more, the limited storage capacity of the vehicles makes frequent re-fueling necessary, which means a lot of stations need to be built to keep this type of car running over a long distance. Limnia claims, “With our solid-state cassettes, you can drive 2,500 miles across America without ever turning off your engine. You can just hot-swap cassette modules,” said Redmond. Three cassettes in an electric car can take you 300 miles. “Fifteen companies have designed electric cars that can take you 600 miles on the same three cassettes,” said Redmond. The company’s cassettes, which also power homes, buildings, communities, data centers, and more, integrate board, box, safety, mounting, signal path, power path, shielding, I/O, sequencing, and support rail into a complete chassis system. Unlike conventional systems, Limnia uses a small pack of batteries as a supplement – the Battery Multiplex Array (BMA) massive Commodity-class battery pack. “The batteries are not direct to the motor. They are in between. The fuel cell is constantly recharging them, so we can get away with fewer batteries,” said Scott Redmond, Vice President of Product Architecture, Limnia, Inc.. Limnia’s system uses existing infrastructure to replace the cassettes, with drop-off and pick-up locations at UPS, FedEx, and Kinko’s. You can also have new fuel cassettes shipped to you through one of these carriers or US Mail, or simply re-fuel the cassettes in your home. A home pack, which comes with the system, re-charges the cassettes using two methods. The first is hydrolysis, which cracks the hydrogen. “If you electrocute water in a certain way with a certain type of salt, hydrogen bubbles out of the water. Limnia’s home pack uses the GE Noryl electrolyzer, which makes hydrogen cheaper than any other method out there – even gasoline,” said Redmond. The other way to produce hydrogen is via a microbial reactor. This consists of specially engineered bugs that eat waste to release hydrogen gas. Both sources of hydrogen are readily available. The home pack uses kitchen waste, as well as water to produce the hydrogen. Storage racks in the base of the unit hold charged cassettes for future use.

    What’s more, hydrogen powered appliances are now available in both the consumer and industrial markets, driven by improvements in the automotive industry. In cold weather environments, fuel cells can replace heating systems. According to Redmond, “There is a type of fuel cell for homes that runs hotter than it needs to run. Heat is piped off the fuel cell with water tubes that extend underneath the floor. With this type of system, there is no reason you need to be hooked up to a grid.” Initial cost of investment is high; however, Redmond said that over time, it pays for itself.

    “We’ve had a lot of data centers call us for battery-backup because the hydrogen fuel cells have a longer run time, no EMF, and no vibration,” said Redmond. Big buildings are also installing fuel cell systems. “In Silicone Valley a lot of the big Internet companies are having to move out because they cannot pull enough electricity to the building, but they can pull water and natural gas to the building, which you can crack to run the fuel cell,” he added.

    Many fuel cell systems are available for large factories and large industrial systems. They suit certain industries because they produce no vibration, no toxic fumes, and no outgassing. They also have a cleaner electrical signal, less failures, and almost no maintenance.

  • http://jonalist.bravehost.com/Jonalist.html Charles Jones

    I would recommend that everyone desiring to create a business of converting a vehicle to another form of fuel supply consider, The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF). There are issues which should be the commanding solution for Banks, Loan Associations, and consumer’s, mainly resulting from how vehicles have been handled in payment processing. The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) at http://jonalist.bravehost.com/Jonalist.html is a unique project which would endorse every such operation in all states and be a free conversion. You really must read more about this project to fully understand how a warranty protects the consumer as well as the public from abuse of conversion as there are possible problems which result in people taking a unfair advantage of others from a converted vehicle such that they would establish a business of renting their vehicle to others at a profit. The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) would find them out and such warranty would be ended, their Grant which allowed the conversion would be invalid and state law enforcement could apprehend them and the vehicle confiscated immediately because without supporting the Grant Process a consumer is violating others rights whom are and the illegality issue they began by renting the vehicle in a business would be against the rules set forth in the Grant, loss of the Grant and the warranty makes the vehicle a threat to others whom are driving their vehicle with or without conversion so a lawsuit is not actually something The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) is willing to undertake to resolve issues created by those whom take advantage of others. Really it is a open shut case against those individuals and a warning is not a fair way to show others they are being protected, the state then has the advantage to cease the individuals drivers license and all insurance companies can refuse to sell that individual a insurance policy coverage from that day further which is saying a mouthful to those whom take advantage of others to not do that to their driving record. By all logical means this is the ultimate punishment a individual should experience, it is about as bad as driving off from a gas station without paying or stealing gasoline, where in some states a first offense is a fine of $500 and a second offense is also a fine of $500 plus forfeiture of their drivers license and their vehicle is towed in and ceased which results in a impoundments fee, and insurance coverage to get it back.

    Ethanol creation via corn a eatable crop is more likely to end once Genetics starts entering the fuel processing methods to consider, some of these genetic options are already heading to Brazil to begin processing and growth. Economical Flower Greenhouses are far more appealing than Pig Dung Processing Plants to produce Bio-Diesel and Flowers producing Ethanol would be sweeter. General Electric made a good consideration to create a Hydrogen Generator for running off the Power Grid. I figure that Genetically Altered Flowers being made capable to grow cellulose containing sugar would be the objective to have a high yield of Ethanol from bio-digester processes. We would need a super large building to accomplish this and we would have to end any Flower Sales based on keeping strict control of the Flower because of its Genetic Altercation. Ethanol would then become a produced fuel from Flowers and we could bring a limitation of its production through corn plus bring into the mix other sources for the bio-digestion to convert and this would conserve on having separate facilities for converting the plant materials to Ethanol. Therefore one or more conversion facilities could be created in each state.

    Alabama Gas has yet to announce their support for CGN and it could be that their controller Energen Corporation has more say in what Alabama Gas can do than Alabama Gas so the limited support given to this is because of this situation. It is a concern that consumer’s with a CNG Vehicle can own a Refill Station for their home, it is another concern that a thief can access their home and steal it or the Natural Gas and continue on their journey, but hereto the issue is that of making these units as a rental for a homeowner through their Gas Company so its use will be added to their billing statement each month. This can cause a issue to homeowners whom work for a employer that has a policy to give them fuel cost they incur during their employ. A home Refill station does no show whom is using the unit and how much is being used so the actual amount is skeptical in so much that a mans wife could also own a CNG Vehicle and use it as well as he whom is covered by his company policy. The final situation is that many homes do not have a connection that is without the need of installing requiring the Natural Gas Company to come out to the home to cut-off the Natural Gas Supply so a installer could install a connection for a Home Refill Station for a consumer. If a consumer needs this they should also consider whether or not they should have another connection for their barbecue grill and do that connection as well.

    Consumer’s have something else to be thankful for besides CNG Vehicles, a company now in China makes a CNG Bicycle and another company makes CNG lawnmowers, other companies make CNG motorcycles. It will not be long in waiting that companies will consider making CNG powered motor boats and two person water transport vehicles. This growing marketing field is bringing more job responsibilities to all Natural Gas Suppliers and people seeking jobs should always check that option for their livelihood. Their is another company whom is making the process of adding CNG and Hydrogen to their vehicle by changing a module which has the fuel in it instead and it also has a separate home refill option – . This is entirely new Product Architecture, Gas to Solid-State, is now offered by Limnia, Inc. more info here: http://www.limnia.com/

    The most widely talked about method of storing hydrogen is in pressurized tanks, where the gas is typically under pressure from 10,000 to 30,000 psi. Hydrogen pressurized in cylinders has limited storage capacity because of its low density. For electric vehicles, most tank-based systems average 100 to150 miles on one tank. Tank-based storage systems have other disadvantages too. “They’re problematic up and down. The tanks are so big, they take up a lot of space, and the re-fueling process can be dangerous because of the high pressure coming out of the pump,” said Redmond. What’s more, the limited storage capacity of the vehicles makes frequent re-fueling necessary, which means a lot of stations need to be built to keep this type of car running over a long distance. Limnia claims, “With our solid-state cassettes, you can drive 2,500 miles across America without ever turning off your engine. You can just hot-swap cassette modules,” said Redmond. Three cassettes in an electric car can take you 300 miles. “Fifteen companies have designed electric cars that can take you 600 miles on the same three cassettes,” said Redmond. The company’s cassettes, which also power homes, buildings, communities, data centers, and more, integrate board, box, safety, mounting, signal path, power path, shielding, I/O, sequencing, and support rail into a complete chassis system. Unlike conventional systems, Limnia uses a small pack of batteries as a supplement – the Battery Multiplex Array (BMA) massive Commodity-class battery pack. “The batteries are not direct to the motor. They are in between. The fuel cell is constantly recharging them, so we can get away with fewer batteries,” said Scott Redmond, Vice President of Product Architecture, Limnia, Inc.. Limnia’s system uses existing infrastructure to replace the cassettes, with drop-off and pick-up locations at UPS, FedEx, and Kinko’s. You can also have new fuel cassettes shipped to you through one of these carriers or US Mail, or simply re-fuel the cassettes in your home. A home pack, which comes with the system, re-charges the cassettes using two methods. The first is hydrolysis, which cracks the hydrogen. “If you electrocute water in a certain way with a certain type of salt, hydrogen bubbles out of the water. Limnia’s home pack uses the GE Noryl electrolyzer, which makes hydrogen cheaper than any other method out there – even gasoline,” said Redmond. The other way to produce hydrogen is via a microbial reactor. This consists of specially engineered bugs that eat waste to release hydrogen gas. Both sources of hydrogen are readily available. The home pack uses kitchen waste, as well as water to produce the hydrogen. Storage racks in the base of the unit hold charged cassettes for future use.

    What’s more, hydrogen powered appliances are now available in both the consumer and industrial markets, driven by improvements in the automotive industry. In cold weather environments, fuel cells can replace heating systems. According to Redmond, “There is a type of fuel cell for homes that runs hotter than it needs to run. Heat is piped off the fuel cell with water tubes that extend underneath the floor. With this type of system, there is no reason you need to be hooked up to a grid.” Initial cost of investment is high; however, Redmond said that over time, it pays for itself.

    “We’ve had a lot of data centers call us for battery-backup because the hydrogen fuel cells have a longer run time, no EMF, and no vibration,” said Redmond. Big buildings are also installing fuel cell systems. “In Silicone Valley a lot of the big Internet companies are having to move out because they cannot pull enough electricity to the building, but they can pull water and natural gas to the building, which you can crack to run the fuel cell,” he added.

    Many fuel cell systems are available for large factories and large industrial systems. They suit certain industries because they produce no vibration, no toxic fumes, and no outgassing. They also have a cleaner electrical signal, less failures, and almost no maintenance.

  • http://jonalist.bravehost.com/Jonalist.html Charles Jones

    I would recommend that everyone desiring to create a business of converting a vehicle to another form of fuel supply consider, The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF). There are issues which should be the commanding solution for Banks, Loan Associations, and consumer’s, mainly resulting from how vehicles have been handled in payment processing. The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) at http://jonalist.bravehost.com/Jonalist.html is a unique project which would endorse every such operation in all states and be a free conversion. You really must read more about this project to fully understand how a warranty protects the consumer as well as the public from abuse of conversion as there are possible problems which result in people taking a unfair advantage of others from a converted vehicle such that they would establish a business of renting their vehicle to others at a profit. The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) would find them out and such warranty would be ended, their Grant which allowed the conversion would be invalid and state law enforcement could apprehend them and the vehicle confiscated immediately because without supporting the Grant Process a consumer is violating others rights whom are and the illegality issue they began by renting the vehicle in a business would be against the rules set forth in the Grant, loss of the Grant and the warranty makes the vehicle a threat to others whom are driving their vehicle with or without conversion so a lawsuit is not actually something The Electric Vehicle Free Conversion Foundation (EVFCF) is willing to undertake to resolve issues created by those whom take advantage of others. Really it is a open shut case against those individuals and a warning is not a fair way to show others they are being protected, the state then has the advantage to cease the individuals drivers license and all insurance companies can refuse to sell that individual a insurance policy coverage from that day further which is saying a mouthful to those whom take advantage of others to not do that to their driving record. By all logical means this is the ultimate punishment a individual should experience, it is about as bad as driving off from a gas station without paying or stealing gasoline, where in some states a first offense is a fine of $500 and a second offense is also a fine of $500 plus forfeiture of their drivers license and their vehicle is towed in and ceased which results in a impoundments fee, and insurance coverage to get it back.

    Ethanol creation via corn a eatable crop is more likely to end once Genetics starts entering the fuel processing methods to consider, some of these genetic options are already heading to Brazil to begin processing and growth. Economical Flower Greenhouses are far more appealing than Pig Dung Processing Plants to produce Bio-Diesel and Flowers producing Ethanol would be sweeter. General Electric made a good consideration to create a Hydrogen Generator for running off the Power Grid. I figure that Genetically Altered Flowers being made capable to grow cellulose containing sugar would be the objective to have a high yield of Ethanol from bio-digester processes. We would need a super large building to accomplish this and we would have to end any Flower Sales based on keeping strict control of the Flower because of its Genetic Altercation. Ethanol would then become a produced fuel from Flowers and we could bring a limitation of its production through corn plus bring into the mix other sources for the bio-digestion to convert and this would conserve on having separate facilities for converting the plant materials to Ethanol. Therefore one or more conversion facilities could be created in each state.

    Alabama Gas has yet to announce their support for CGN and it could be that their controller Energen Corporation has more say in what Alabama Gas can do than Alabama Gas so the limited support given to this is because of this situation. It is a concern that consumer’s with a CNG Vehicle can own a Refill Station for their home, it is another concern that a thief can access their home and steal it or the Natural Gas and continue on their journey, but hereto the issue is that of making these units as a rental for a homeowner through their Gas Company so its use will be added to their billing statement each month. This can cause a issue to homeowners whom work for a employer that has a policy to give them fuel cost they incur during their employ. A home Refill station does no show whom is using the unit and how much is being used so the actual amount is skeptical in so much that a mans wife could also own a CNG Vehicle and use it as well as he whom is covered by his company policy. The final situation is that many homes do not have a connection that is without the need of installing requiring the Natural Gas Company to come out to the home to cut-off the Natural Gas Supply so a installer could install a connection for a Home Refill Station for a consumer. If a consumer needs this they should also consider whether or not they should have another connection for their barbecue grill and do that connection as well.

    Consumer’s have something else to be thankful for besides CNG Vehicles, a company now in China makes a CNG Bicycle and another company makes CNG lawnmowers, other companies make CNG motorcycles. It will not be long in waiting that companies will consider making CNG powered motor boats and two person water transport vehicles. This growing marketing field is bringing more job responsibilities to all Natural Gas Suppliers and people seeking jobs should always check that option for their livelihood. Their is another company whom is making the process of adding CNG and Hydrogen to their vehicle by changing a module which has the fuel in it instead and it also has a separate home refill option – . This is entirely new Product Architecture, Gas to Solid-State, is now offered by Limnia, Inc. more info here: http://www.limnia.com/

    The most widely talked about method of storing hydrogen is in pressurized tanks, where the gas is typically under pressure from 10,000 to 30,000 psi. Hydrogen pressurized in cylinders has limited storage capacity because of its low density. For electric vehicles, most tank-based systems average 100 to150 miles on one tank. Tank-based storage systems have other disadvantages too. “They’re problematic up and down. The tanks are so big, they take up a lot of space, and the re-fueling process can be dangerous because of the high pressure coming out of the pump,” said Redmond. What’s more, the limited storage capacity of the vehicles makes frequent re-fueling necessary, which means a lot of stations need to be built to keep this type of car running over a long distance. Limnia claims, “With our solid-state cassettes, you can drive 2,500 miles across America without ever turning off your engine. You can just hot-swap cassette modules,” said Redmond. Three cassettes in an electric car can take you 300 miles. “Fifteen companies have designed electric cars that can take you 600 miles on the same three cassettes,” said Redmond. The company’s cassettes, which also power homes, buildings, communities, data centers, and more, integrate board, box, safety, mounting, signal path, power path, shielding, I/O, sequencing, and support rail into a complete chassis system. Unlike conventional systems, Limnia uses a small pack of batteries as a supplement – the Battery Multiplex Array (BMA) massive Commodity-class battery pack. “The batteries are not direct to the motor. They are in between. The fuel cell is constantly recharging them, so we can get away with fewer batteries,” said Scott Redmond, Vice President of Product Architecture, Limnia, Inc.. Limnia’s system uses existing infrastructure to replace the cassettes, with drop-off and pick-up locations at UPS, FedEx, and Kinko’s. You can also have new fuel cassettes shipped to you through one of these carriers or US Mail, or simply re-fuel the cassettes in your home. A home pack, which comes with the system, re-charges the cassettes using two methods. The first is hydrolysis, which cracks the hydrogen. “If you electrocute water in a certain way with a certain type of salt, hydrogen bubbles out of the water. Limnia’s home pack uses the GE Noryl electrolyzer, which makes hydrogen cheaper than any other method out there – even gasoline,” said Redmond. The other way to produce hydrogen is via a microbial reactor. This consists of specially engineered bugs that eat waste to release hydrogen gas. Both sources of hydrogen are readily available. The home pack uses kitchen waste, as well as water to produce the hydrogen. Storage racks in the base of the unit hold charged cassettes for future use.

    What’s more, hydrogen powered appliances are now available in both the consumer and industrial markets, driven by improvements in the automotive industry. In cold weather environments, fuel cells can replace heating systems. According to Redmond, “There is a type of fuel cell for homes that runs hotter than it needs to run. Heat is piped off the fuel cell with water tubes that extend underneath the floor. With this type of system, there is no reason you need to be hooked up to a grid.” Initial cost of investment is high; however, Redmond said that over time, it pays for itself.

    “We’ve had a lot of data centers call us for battery-backup because the hydrogen fuel cells have a longer run time, no EMF, and no vibration,” said Redmond. Big buildings are also installing fuel cell systems. “In Silicone Valley a lot of the big Internet companies are having to move out because they cannot pull enough electricity to the building, but they can pull water and natural gas to the building, which you can crack to run the fuel cell,” he added.

    Many fuel cell systems are available for large factories and large industrial systems. They suit certain industries because they produce no vibration, no toxic fumes, and no outgassing. They also have a cleaner electrical signal, less failures, and almost no maintenance.

  • Mario Covi

    Iam all for it.Why is that these cars are not being made by GMC, Ford and Chrysler?

  • Mario Covi

    Iam all for it.Why is that these cars are not being made by GMC, Ford and Chrysler?

  • Mario Covi

    Iam all for it.Why is that these cars are not being made by GMC, Ford and Chrysler?

  • K.b

    I like this car make more lol or the post make more of the posts. anyway keep telling people the more they know the more they want it

  • K.b

    I like this car make more lol or the post make more of the posts. anyway keep telling people the more they know the more they want it

  • K.b

    I like this car make more lol or the post make more of the posts. anyway keep telling people the more they know the more they want it

  • Rainy

    Back in the 70s we told people it’s going to run out. Natural gas as a transition is ok. Solar would be even better so that we can get around with zero emissions, don’t need a gas station, sun shines most every day, everywhere, with a battery backup. Why is this not happening? Big business would take a blow. Come on people, jump on the bandwagon and tell your candidate you want it now. The technology is there and if you want it, it will come but we have to scream for it.

  • Rainy

    Back in the 70s we told people it’s going to run out. Natural gas as a transition is ok. Solar would be even better so that we can get around with zero emissions, don’t need a gas station, sun shines most every day, everywhere, with a battery backup. Why is this not happening? Big business would take a blow. Come on people, jump on the bandwagon and tell your candidate you want it now. The technology is there and if you want it, it will come but we have to scream for it.

  • Rainy

    Back in the 70s we told people it’s going to run out. Natural gas as a transition is ok. Solar would be even better so that we can get around with zero emissions, don’t need a gas station, sun shines most every day, everywhere, with a battery backup. Why is this not happening? Big business would take a blow. Come on people, jump on the bandwagon and tell your candidate you want it now. The technology is there and if you want it, it will come but we have to scream for it.

  • Mike Sizemore

    What is the costs and procedure to transform my current vehicles to natural gas

  • Mike Sizemore

    What is the costs and procedure to transform my current vehicles to natural gas

  • coordin8ed

    I want to know when more automakers will make NGV’s for the US commuters. With Adsorbed Natural Gas tanks (filled with activated charcoal or corn cobs) the pressure can be reduced significantly and the tanks can be custom shaped to fit different cars better, all the while increasing the cars range as well. And yes it’s spelled correctly – Adsorbed,

    http://www.energtek.com/market/natural_gas_vehicles

  • coordin8ed

    I want to know when more automakers will make NGV’s for the US commuters. With Adsorbed Natural Gas tanks (filled with activated charcoal or corn cobs) the pressure can be reduced significantly and the tanks can be custom shaped to fit different cars better, all the while increasing the cars range as well. And yes it’s spelled correctly – Adsorbed,

    http://www.energtek.com/market/natural_gas_vehicles

  • LAVON CARDON

    Clayton. How about giving us a comparison between propane (LPG) and natural gas (CNG) as an alternative fuel. LPG requires a much lower storage pressure so the tank isn’t so bulky…etc. In the late 70’s LPG conversions were popular where cars and trucks could run on either gasolene or propane by the flip of a switch. An observation is that LPG fueling stations are easy to find whereas CNG is rare. How about a well researched article giving us the pro’s and con’s of LPG vs CNG? Thank you.

  • LAVON CARDON

    Clayton. How about giving us a comparison between propane (LPG) and natural gas (CNG) as an alternative fuel. LPG requires a much lower storage pressure so the tank isn’t so bulky…etc. In the late 70’s LPG conversions were popular where cars and trucks could run on either gasolene or propane by the flip of a switch. An observation is that LPG fueling stations are easy to find whereas CNG is rare. How about a well researched article giving us the pro’s and con’s of LPG vs CNG? Thank you.

  • LAVON CARDON

    Clayton. How about giving us a comparison between propane (LPG) and natural gas (CNG) as an alternative fuel. LPG requires a much lower storage pressure so the tank isn’t so bulky…etc. In the late 70’s LPG conversions were popular where cars and trucks could run on either gasolene or propane by the flip of a switch. An observation is that LPG fueling stations are easy to find whereas CNG is rare. How about a well researched article giving us the pro’s and con’s of LPG vs CNG? Thank you.

  • mel

    My sister lives in Georgia and says the price of natural gas has tripled in the past 5 years. Are we just trading one foreign type of price gouging for a domestic one? Its hard to see natural gas as any more than a transitional fuel for the next ten years or so, until the fuel cell technology catches up. T Boone Pickens has a plan based on natural gas in cars replacing gasoline and saving 30% of our fossil-fuel requirements. HUGE wind power farms would allow the natural gas we now use for industry to be shifted to our vehicles. While I agree it would be domestic power, and that is a good thing generally, I strongly object to be gouged by domestic natural gas producers too.

  • mel

    My sister lives in Georgia and says the price of natural gas has tripled in the past 5 years. Are we just trading one foreign type of price gouging for a domestic one? Its hard to see natural gas as any more than a transitional fuel for the next ten years or so, until the fuel cell technology catches up. T Boone Pickens has a plan based on natural gas in cars replacing gasoline and saving 30% of our fossil-fuel requirements. HUGE wind power farms would allow the natural gas we now use for industry to be shifted to our vehicles. While I agree it would be domestic power, and that is a good thing generally, I strongly object to be gouged by domestic natural gas producers too.

  • mel

    My sister lives in Georgia and says the price of natural gas has tripled in the past 5 years. Are we just trading one foreign type of price gouging for a domestic one? Its hard to see natural gas as any more than a transitional fuel for the next ten years or so, until the fuel cell technology catches up. T Boone Pickens has a plan based on natural gas in cars replacing gasoline and saving 30% of our fossil-fuel requirements. HUGE wind power farms would allow the natural gas we now use for industry to be shifted to our vehicles. While I agree it would be domestic power, and that is a good thing generally, I strongly object to be gouged by domestic natural gas producers too.

  • Jim Hiebert

    Ten years ago General Motors built the Chevrolet Metro that averaged 52mpg. It wouldn’t take GM long to put these cars back into production. It would help save gas for now.

  • Jim Hiebert

    Ten years ago General Motors built the Chevrolet Metro that averaged 52mpg. It wouldn’t take GM long to put these cars back into production. It would help save gas for now.

  • Jim Hiebert

    Ten years ago General Motors built the Chevrolet Metro that averaged 52mpg. It wouldn’t take GM long to put these cars back into production. It would help save gas for now.

  • Kevin

    For the last 20 years it seems that an average car has not better milage nor better emission. They can go to the moon, I’m sure they can make better cars. It’s probably an economical/money issue.

  • Kevin

    For the last 20 years it seems that an average car has not better milage nor better emission. They can go to the moon, I’m sure they can make better cars. It’s probably an economical/money issue.

  • http://none Jimi McQue

    Mr. Hiebert-

    The Geo Metro is out of production because it cannot pass safety regs. There’s also the small matter that no one wanted them or bought them. If an ‘updated’ Geo Metro were to be put back into production, it wouold weigh 550-700 pounds more than before,due to safety regulations you voted for. The heavier the vehicle, the more fuel to move it. The Metro was a loser, and GM would lose again if they put it out.

    Buy a Geo used, spend $4999 to rebuild the thing and you will be happy with a loser car that MIGHT get your 52 MPG.

  • Steve D

    How Much do these cars cost? can a disabled person afford one?

  • Steve D

    How Much do these cars cost? can a disabled person afford one?

  • Steve D

    How Much do these cars cost? can a disabled person afford one?

  • Steve D

    How Much do these cars cost? can a disabled person afford one?

  • http://madurosfritos.blogspot.com Pedro R. Lopez

    Electric cars is the solution.

    We need to find a way to procedure cheap electricity.

  • http://madurosfritos.blogspot.com Pedro R. Lopez

    Electric cars is the solution.

    We need to find a way to procedure cheap electricity.

  • http://www.eprepservices.com Eric Gordon

    I vote for Pedro!

    Actually, electric everything is the solution because there is an infinite variety of ways to produce and distribute electricity. Once you make the switch, it no longer matters if its cheap or expensive, or clean or dirty; its having the “options” that counts. Obviously, there are clean, sustainable ways to produce electricity.

    I chose a diesel vehicle for transportation not because it was cheap, or particularly clean, but because it gives me more options down the road, literally. There is petroleum diesel, biodiesel, vegetable oil,…etc

  • http://www.eprepservices.com Eric Gordon

    I vote for Pedro!

    Actually, electric everything is the solution because there is an infinite variety of ways to produce and distribute electricity. Once you make the switch, it no longer matters if its cheap or expensive, or clean or dirty; its having the “options” that counts. Obviously, there are clean, sustainable ways to produce electricity.

    I chose a diesel vehicle for transportation not because it was cheap, or particularly clean, but because it gives me more options down the road, literally. There is petroleum diesel, biodiesel, vegetable oil,…etc

  • http://www.eprepservices.com Eric Gordon

    I vote for Pedro!

    Actually, electric everything is the solution because there is an infinite variety of ways to produce and distribute electricity. Once you make the switch, it no longer matters if its cheap or expensive, or clean or dirty; its having the “options” that counts. Obviously, there are clean, sustainable ways to produce electricity.

    I chose a diesel vehicle for transportation not because it was cheap, or particularly clean, but because it gives me more options down the road, literally. There is petroleum diesel, biodiesel, vegetable oil,…etc

  • George

    I live in Colorado. There are natural gas wells all over the state and more being developed and a mature system to transport it to homes and out of the state. To me Natural Gas is the obvious choice initially over hydrogen as there is no existing infrastructure for hydrogen yet.

  • George

    I live in Colorado. There are natural gas wells all over the state and more being developed and a mature system to transport it to homes and out of the state. To me Natural Gas is the obvious choice initially over hydrogen as there is no existing infrastructure for hydrogen yet.

  • George

    I live in Colorado. There are natural gas wells all over the state and more being developed and a mature system to transport it to homes and out of the state. To me Natural Gas is the obvious choice initially over hydrogen as there is no existing infrastructure for hydrogen yet.

  • George

    Electric is interesting but there are some challenges there as well. One is you are converting from one energy e.g. coal, gas, etc to electricity in which there are losses then yet another conversion to mechanical energy. Battery’s are heavy and are not clean to produce, even a deal battery is heavy with is energy to lug around. As you consume fossil fuels to mechanical energy the weight consumes as you go.

  • George

    Electric is interesting but there are some challenges there as well. One is you are converting from one energy e.g. coal, gas, etc to electricity in which there are losses then yet another conversion to mechanical energy. Battery’s are heavy and are not clean to produce, even a deal battery is heavy with is energy to lug around. As you consume fossil fuels to mechanical energy the weight consumes as you go.

  • Lee Goodenough

    Can a standard gasoline engine be converted to natural gas? If so what is involved in making this conversion and what does is cost?

  • Lee Goodenough

    Can a standard gasoline engine be converted to natural gas? If so what is involved in making this conversion and what does is cost?

  • Lee Goodenough

    Can a standard gasoline engine be converted to natural gas? If so what is involved in making this conversion and what does is cost?

  • Sam Wilson

    There is a company out of Utah that has natural gas conversion kits imported from Argentina and Italy. The kit itself starts at $1500ish. A new tank runs $2000-$3000, or you can buy a used one for about a thousand or so (make sure it’s DOT approved, no expired ones either). And professional installation is $1500. So total is around 5K. The website is cngoutfitters.com. They are developing a network of installation shops around the nation, so you should see them popping up eventually.

  • Sam Wilson

    There is a company out of Utah that has natural gas conversion kits imported from Argentina and Italy. The kit itself starts at $1500ish. A new tank runs $2000-$3000, or you can buy a used one for about a thousand or so (make sure it’s DOT approved, no expired ones either). And professional installation is $1500. So total is around 5K. The website is cngoutfitters.com. They are developing a network of installation shops around the nation, so you should see them popping up eventually.

  • Don Silkwood

    In 1983 – 1985 I owned an Ford F 100 pickup which was able to run on gasoline or natrual gas. The natrual gas burned much much cleaner than did the gasoline, which was proved when we tore down the engine to see the differnce between the natrual gas and gasoline. As it turns out everything lasts longer; things like spark plugs, pistons and rings and the like. I’m ready to convert my pickup now. How do I do it? I had the eighty gallon plus the twenty gallon gas tank…so it was nice to go on trips and go over a thousand miles before refueling.

  • Don Silkwood

    In 1983 – 1985 I owned an Ford F 100 pickup which was able to run on gasoline or natrual gas. The natrual gas burned much much cleaner than did the gasoline, which was proved when we tore down the engine to see the differnce between the natrual gas and gasoline. As it turns out everything lasts longer; things like spark plugs, pistons and rings and the like. I’m ready to convert my pickup now. How do I do it? I had the eighty gallon plus the twenty gallon gas tank…so it was nice to go on trips and go over a thousand miles before refueling.

  • John

    You’re all wet

  • John

    You’re all wet

  • Cherie Richards

    What is the mileage for these NGV’s? I’ll drive to NY if need be to buy one. Thank you!

  • Cherie Richards

    What is the mileage for these NGV’s? I’ll drive to NY if need be to buy one. Thank you!

  • Cherie Richards

    What is the mileage for these NGV’s? I’ll drive to NY if need be to buy one. Thank you!

  • Bill Davis

    I believe Hydrogen is the best way to stop the independance on foreign oil. Water is plentiful.

    New houses are required to use an airrator septic system and they spray the treated water on the yard. This water could be pumped into tanks and used as a fual for hybrid hydrogen cars.

    • max G

      Bill how much energy will it take to produce usable H2? The numbers just don’t work. Too expensive. Help me understand your argument. Please.

  • Bill Davis

    I believe Hydrogen is the best way to stop the independance on foreign oil. Water is plentiful.

    New houses are required to use an airrator septic system and they spray the treated water on the yard. This water could be pumped into tanks and used as a fual for hybrid hydrogen cars.

  • Bill Davis

    I believe Hydrogen is the best way to stop the independance on foreign oil. Water is plentiful.

    New houses are required to use an airrator septic system and they spray the treated water on the yard. This water could be pumped into tanks and used as a fual for hybrid hydrogen cars.

  • Bill Davis

    Is propane a clean burning fual?

  • Bill Davis

    Is propane a clean burning fual?

  • Hi_n_thsaddle

    I am still trying to figure out what the mpg would be using cng? Or how often u would have to fill up?

  • Hi_n_thsaddle

    I am still trying to figure out what the mpg would be using cng? Or how often u would have to fill up?

  • Dash C

    Fossil fuels of all types, it seems, are not the answer. Yes, they may buy us some time, but we need something that is completely renewable, self cleaning, and can be produced privately, not only corporately.

    The french already have cars that run on compressed air, and the Italians have a highly efficient compressed air rotary engine.

    This just seems to be a ‘no-brainer’ option for a simple drive to work and back. Not to mention an answer for the less efficient portion of the average automobile, regardless of what fossil fuel it runs on.

  • Dash C

    Fossil fuels of all types, it seems, are not the answer. Yes, they may buy us some time, but we need something that is completely renewable, self cleaning, and can be produced privately, not only corporately.

    The french already have cars that run on compressed air, and the Italians have a highly efficient compressed air rotary engine.

    This just seems to be a ‘no-brainer’ option for a simple drive to work and back. Not to mention an answer for the less efficient portion of the average automobile, regardless of what fossil fuel it runs on.

  • Dash C

    Fossil fuels of all types, it seems, are not the answer. Yes, they may buy us some time, but we need something that is completely renewable, self cleaning, and can be produced privately, not only corporately.

    The french already have cars that run on compressed air, and the Italians have a highly efficient compressed air rotary engine.

    This just seems to be a ‘no-brainer’ option for a simple drive to work and back. Not to mention an answer for the less efficient portion of the average automobile, regardless of what fossil fuel it runs on.

  • Dash C

    mpg for the civic gx (2008) is 24 city, 36 hwy.

    that’s from honda’s website per epa.

    not THAT great, even if it is clean(er) and cheap(er).

  • Dash C

    mpg for the civic gx (2008) is 24 city, 36 hwy.

    that’s from honda’s website per epa.

    not THAT great, even if it is clean(er) and cheap(er).

  • Dash C

    mpg for the civic gx (2008) is 24 city, 36 hwy.

    that’s from honda’s website per epa.

    not THAT great, even if it is clean(er) and cheap(er).

  • http://johnbrazil81@yahoo.com John M. Brazil

    I have a H2, car. Please, come see it!

    John M. Brazil

    Apt. 605

    1655 Winchester Blvd.

    Campbell, Ca 95008

    408-369-9922

  • SOLO

    what the hell is this rubbish about IMPORTING of natural gas!!!

    our own poop, or our cows/chickens can happily supply the necessary fecal matter to be cheaply converted into methane.

    A quick google search will show you a number of methane -powered vehicles, which can be done with very basic technology.

    Why is the industry so stupid? why can’t we stop making our enemies rich?

    look up Jay Leno’s article about his 100 year old electric cars. What the hell do we have to do to force our politicians to actually USE the clean technology which is ALREADY HERE FOR THE PAST 100 YEARS !!!!!!

  • SOLO

    what the hell is this rubbish about IMPORTING of natural gas!!!

    our own poop, or our cows/chickens can happily supply the necessary fecal matter to be cheaply converted into methane.

    A quick google search will show you a number of methane -powered vehicles, which can be done with very basic technology.

    Why is the industry so stupid? why can’t we stop making our enemies rich?

    look up Jay Leno’s article about his 100 year old electric cars. What the hell do we have to do to force our politicians to actually USE the clean technology which is ALREADY HERE FOR THE PAST 100 YEARS !!!!!!

  • TexasEngineer

    We need an incremental approach that uses what we have available right now and does not rely on technologies that are decades away from commercial viability and widespread use. Natural gas is something we can do right now, and we need to act right now to create a bridge to the future before it is too late.

    CNG vehicle conversion is simple and all the technology is already in existence. We already have a massive distribution network for natural gas. One of the most compelling facts that is probably unknown to the American people is that the combination of horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing of gas rich shale zones in various regions of the country has recently resulted in proving up the existence of and economic viability of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas that is not accounted for in current estimates of proved reserves. Most of this is found in Texas and Louisiana where we have the world’s best infrastructure in terms of trained people and equipment for development of these reserves. These short reserves life numbers for natural gas quoted above are for proved producing reserves and assume that we stop development today. We have trillions of cubic feet of proved undeveloped, probable, and possible reserves categories that are not included in these low numbers. Moreover, development of this massive quantity of relatively clean energy is already economical without any government interference or tax credits. The largest foreign sources of natural gas are not from OPEC countries which spreads the risk of supply disruptions of imports when they are required.

    Besides lower green-house gas and pollutant emissions, CNG requires far less processing than oil. Cleaning up natural gas from the wellhead can be done through thousands of small (cleaner) facilities and therefore massive refineries are not required. The surface environmental impact of natural gas wells and processing equipment is much less than the impact of oil production and processing. The less imported oil we use the less tanker traffic and the less oil spills we should see. We already have a vast pipeline network for natural gas which can be easily expanded.

    The first vehicles should be bi-fuel with the capacity to run on gasoline/ethanol or natural gas at the flick of a switch. See http://www.cngoutfitters.com for an example of this. The next logical step would be a plug-in hybrid natural gas vehicle to further reduce CO2 emissions and improve fuel economy that could also run off the electric grid.

    There is no panacea but CNG is a great incremental step we can take right now. All engineering designs involve trade-offs. Everyone needs to realize that any solution requires materials and those materials must come from the earth. Hydrogen is great but currently made from fossil fuels which releases CO2. Ethanol processing creates huge amounts of CO2 and natural gas to cook the corn mash, slurps up vast amounts of water, and uses huge amounts of commercial fertilizer made from fossil fuels not to mention drives up food costs. Batteries are made from various metals as are windmills. High efficiency motors require rare metals from overseas. These metals come out of the ground through mining! When considering all the options please consider the TOTAL impact of the technology, not just what you see running down the road!

  • TexasEngineer

    We need an incremental approach that uses what we have available right now and does not rely on technologies that are decades away from commercial viability and widespread use. Natural gas is something we can do right now, and we need to act right now to create a bridge to the future before it is too late.

    CNG vehicle conversion is simple and all the technology is already in existence. We already have a massive distribution network for natural gas. One of the most compelling facts that is probably unknown to the American people is that the combination of horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing of gas rich shale zones in various regions of the country has recently resulted in proving up the existence of and economic viability of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas that is not accounted for in current estimates of proved reserves. Most of this is found in Texas and Louisiana where we have the world’s best infrastructure in terms of trained people and equipment for development of these reserves. These short reserves life numbers for natural gas quoted above are for proved producing reserves and assume that we stop development today. We have trillions of cubic feet of proved undeveloped, probable, and possible reserves categories that are not included in these low numbers. Moreover, development of this massive quantity of relatively clean energy is already economical without any government interference or tax credits. The largest foreign sources of natural gas are not from OPEC countries which spreads the risk of supply disruptions of imports when they are required.

    Besides lower green-house gas and pollutant emissions, CNG requires far less processing than oil. Cleaning up natural gas from the wellhead can be done through thousands of small (cleaner) facilities and therefore massive refineries are not required. The surface environmental impact of natural gas wells and processing equipment is much less than the impact of oil production and processing. The less imported oil we use the less tanker traffic and the less oil spills we should see. We already have a vast pipeline network for natural gas which can be easily expanded.

    The first vehicles should be bi-fuel with the capacity to run on gasoline/ethanol or natural gas at the flick of a switch. See http://www.cngoutfitters.com for an example of this. The next logical step would be a plug-in hybrid natural gas vehicle to further reduce CO2 emissions and improve fuel economy that could also run off the electric grid.

    There is no panacea but CNG is a great incremental step we can take right now. All engineering designs involve trade-offs. Everyone needs to realize that any solution requires materials and those materials must come from the earth. Hydrogen is great but currently made from fossil fuels which releases CO2. Ethanol processing creates huge amounts of CO2 and natural gas to cook the corn mash, slurps up vast amounts of water, and uses huge amounts of commercial fertilizer made from fossil fuels not to mention drives up food costs. Batteries are made from various metals as are windmills. High efficiency motors require rare metals from overseas. These metals come out of the ground through mining! When considering all the options please consider the TOTAL impact of the technology, not just what you see running down the road!

  • Joseph Probeck

    Natural gas companies have been running all their vehicles on natural gas for decades. Hydrogen is the only combustable fuel that offers absolutely no harmful emmissions; water vapor and heat are the only by products. It seems to me this technology is the way we should be going but for some unknown reason, the technology selected by the car makers is that of Hybrid technology which is the most expensive technology available. We will eventually be forced to switch to hydrogen so why go through all these other alternatives and waste all the time and resources when we can start toward the cheapest and most plentuful fuel available… HYDROGEN! Remember this, the Hindenburg did not explode! It burned rapidly but it did not explode. The paint is what actually caught fire… from a lightning strike. Had that been any carbon based gas, the explosion would have rocked the eastern seaboard. Let’s face it, anything combustable can be dangerous if not given the respect it deserves.

    My fear about converting to natural gas is the increase in demand will drive the price so high we wouldn’t be able to afford it. It couldn’t be supplied in large enough quantities to satisfy need. High demand and short supply spells high prices. I’d much rather see hydrogen stations going in everywhere. That can be produced anywhere there’s water and electricity, or wind to make the electricity if need be. I don’t expect that things will go this way because it makes the most sense. It’s known around the world that the US doesn’t usually do the smart thing.

  • Joseph Probeck

    Natural gas companies have been running all their vehicles on natural gas for decades. Hydrogen is the only combustable fuel that offers absolutely no harmful emmissions; water vapor and heat are the only by products. It seems to me this technology is the way we should be going but for some unknown reason, the technology selected by the car makers is that of Hybrid technology which is the most expensive technology available. We will eventually be forced to switch to hydrogen so why go through all these other alternatives and waste all the time and resources when we can start toward the cheapest and most plentuful fuel available… HYDROGEN! Remember this, the Hindenburg did not explode! It burned rapidly but it did not explode. The paint is what actually caught fire… from a lightning strike. Had that been any carbon based gas, the explosion would have rocked the eastern seaboard. Let’s face it, anything combustable can be dangerous if not given the respect it deserves.

    My fear about converting to natural gas is the increase in demand will drive the price so high we wouldn’t be able to afford it. It couldn’t be supplied in large enough quantities to satisfy need. High demand and short supply spells high prices. I’d much rather see hydrogen stations going in everywhere. That can be produced anywhere there’s water and electricity, or wind to make the electricity if need be. I don’t expect that things will go this way because it makes the most sense. It’s known around the world that the US doesn’t usually do the smart thing.

  • Joseph Probeck

    Natural gas companies have been running all their vehicles on natural gas for decades. Hydrogen is the only combustable fuel that offers absolutely no harmful emmissions; water vapor and heat are the only by products. It seems to me this technology is the way we should be going but for some unknown reason, the technology selected by the car makers is that of Hybrid technology which is the most expensive technology available. We will eventually be forced to switch to hydrogen so why go through all these other alternatives and waste all the time and resources when we can start toward the cheapest and most plentuful fuel available… HYDROGEN! Remember this, the Hindenburg did not explode! It burned rapidly but it did not explode. The paint is what actually caught fire… from a lightning strike. Had that been any carbon based gas, the explosion would have rocked the eastern seaboard. Let’s face it, anything combustable can be dangerous if not given the respect it deserves.

    My fear about converting to natural gas is the increase in demand will drive the price so high we wouldn’t be able to afford it. It couldn’t be supplied in large enough quantities to satisfy need. High demand and short supply spells high prices. I’d much rather see hydrogen stations going in everywhere. That can be produced anywhere there’s water and electricity, or wind to make the electricity if need be. I don’t expect that things will go this way because it makes the most sense. It’s known around the world that the US doesn’t usually do the smart thing.

  • Ruth

    I am hopeful they will be able to convert cars to natural gas so we are not dependent on foreign oil. I live in the epicenter of the Marcellus Shale formation and they are finally starting to drill for natural gas. There are alot of regulations concerning the water supply. New York state seems more strict than Pennsylvania about the water regulations. I have signed on with Chesapeake Energy Where I live in Pennsylvania and with Fortuna for some acreage we own in New York. Our whole village signed on with Chesapeake because we are all hoping to get royalities. I live in a depressed area where decent paying jobs are scarce. We are keeping our fingers crossed.

  • Ruth

    I am hopeful they will be able to convert cars to natural gas so we are not dependent on foreign oil. I live in the epicenter of the Marcellus Shale formation and they are finally starting to drill for natural gas. There are alot of regulations concerning the water supply. New York state seems more strict than Pennsylvania about the water regulations. I have signed on with Chesapeake Energy Where I live in Pennsylvania and with Fortuna for some acreage we own in New York. Our whole village signed on with Chesapeake because we are all hoping to get royalities. I live in a depressed area where decent paying jobs are scarce. We are keeping our fingers crossed.

  • Ruth

    I am hopeful they will be able to convert cars to natural gas so we are not dependent on foreign oil. I live in the epicenter of the Marcellus Shale formation and they are finally starting to drill for natural gas. There are alot of regulations concerning the water supply. New York state seems more strict than Pennsylvania about the water regulations. I have signed on with Chesapeake Energy Where I live in Pennsylvania and with Fortuna for some acreage we own in New York. Our whole village signed on with Chesapeake because we are all hoping to get royalities. I live in a depressed area where decent paying jobs are scarce. We are keeping our fingers crossed.

  • Kevin

    Please consider updating your section on supplies of natural gas. The key thing you are missing is the discovery of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas in shale formations. There currently is a glut of natural gas in North America, primarily due to the success that has been realized in shale gas. The Barnett, Marcellus, Hainesville, Muskwa are just a few of the shales that are producing billions of cubic feet of gas every day. And there is more to come; so North America is NOT running out of natural gas.

  • Kevin

    Please consider updating your section on supplies of natural gas. The key thing you are missing is the discovery of trillions of cubic feet of natural gas in shale formations. There currently is a glut of natural gas in North America, primarily due to the success that has been realized in shale gas. The Barnett, Marcellus, Hainesville, Muskwa are just a few of the shales that are producing billions of cubic feet of gas every day. And there is more to come; so North America is NOT running out of natural gas.

  • Kevin

    A few random comments. Excellent discussion on this site, thanks to the moderators and participants. This is obviously a hot topic these days.

    First, in regard to the comments regarding electric or hydrogen being the only way to move forward; please think about and investigate the origin of electricity or hydrogen in your area. In the case of electricity, the overwhelming majority is generated by burning coal or natural gas. Coal is nasty stuff, and getting it clean is a MAJOR & EXPENSIVE undertaking. Clean coal will not be cheap. Other sources are nuclear (major waste disposal issues), hydroelectric (better, but think of the little fishies), and finally, in tiny amounts, wind and solar (really clean, but wind is noisy and kills birds). Natural gas is the cleanest fuel that is available in large quantities that could be used today. It’s not the final answer, but it is the best fuel to bridge the gap between dirty oil and coal to real renewables.

    In regard to hydrogen – guess what – a lot of it comes from……natural gas. I looked into getting a small fuel cell for my home – it ran on natural gas, converting it to hydrogen. Pretty cool little machines, but still dependent on fossil fuels. Didn’t buy it because it wasn’t economically feasible, it was too expensive. The hydrogen molecule is also a small, slippery little rascal, which makes working with it (think fuel stations) a bit of a problem.

  • Kevin

    A few random comments. Excellent discussion on this site, thanks to the moderators and participants. This is obviously a hot topic these days.

    First, in regard to the comments regarding electric or hydrogen being the only way to move forward; please think about and investigate the origin of electricity or hydrogen in your area. In the case of electricity, the overwhelming majority is generated by burning coal or natural gas. Coal is nasty stuff, and getting it clean is a MAJOR & EXPENSIVE undertaking. Clean coal will not be cheap. Other sources are nuclear (major waste disposal issues), hydroelectric (better, but think of the little fishies), and finally, in tiny amounts, wind and solar (really clean, but wind is noisy and kills birds). Natural gas is the cleanest fuel that is available in large quantities that could be used today. It’s not the final answer, but it is the best fuel to bridge the gap between dirty oil and coal to real renewables.

    In regard to hydrogen – guess what – a lot of it comes from……natural gas. I looked into getting a small fuel cell for my home – it ran on natural gas, converting it to hydrogen. Pretty cool little machines, but still dependent on fossil fuels. Didn’t buy it because it wasn’t economically feasible, it was too expensive. The hydrogen molecule is also a small, slippery little rascal, which makes working with it (think fuel stations) a bit of a problem.

  • Kevin

    A few random comments. Excellent discussion on this site, thanks to the moderators and participants. This is obviously a hot topic these days.

    First, in regard to the comments regarding electric or hydrogen being the only way to move forward; please think about and investigate the origin of electricity or hydrogen in your area. In the case of electricity, the overwhelming majority is generated by burning coal or natural gas. Coal is nasty stuff, and getting it clean is a MAJOR & EXPENSIVE undertaking. Clean coal will not be cheap. Other sources are nuclear (major waste disposal issues), hydroelectric (better, but think of the little fishies), and finally, in tiny amounts, wind and solar (really clean, but wind is noisy and kills birds). Natural gas is the cleanest fuel that is available in large quantities that could be used today. It’s not the final answer, but it is the best fuel to bridge the gap between dirty oil and coal to real renewables.

    In regard to hydrogen – guess what – a lot of it comes from……natural gas. I looked into getting a small fuel cell for my home – it ran on natural gas, converting it to hydrogen. Pretty cool little machines, but still dependent on fossil fuels. Didn’t buy it because it wasn’t economically feasible, it was too expensive. The hydrogen molecule is also a small, slippery little rascal, which makes working with it (think fuel stations) a bit of a problem.

  • joe

    where could i find a shop that would convert a 2000 chev blazer to a nvg vehicle.

    would it be cost Efficient as i now have 80,000 miles on it??

  • joe

    where could i find a shop that would convert a 2000 chev blazer to a nvg vehicle.

    would it be cost Efficient as i now have 80,000 miles on it??

  • joe

    where could i find a shop that would convert a 2000 chev blazer to a nvg vehicle.

    would it be cost Efficient as i now have 80,000 miles on it??

  • joe

    where could i find a shop that would convert a 2000 chev blazer to a nvg vehicle.

    would it be cost Efficient as i now have 80,000 miles on it??

  • Robert

    Natural gas may be cleaner where you burn it, but getting it to consumers creates serious ecological catastrophe.

    It’s completely disingenuous greenwash to consider “natural” gas ‘clean’.

    see:

    http://www.un-naturalgas.org/

    http://www.shaleshock.org

    and all the great reporting on this already; here in Businessweek:

    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/08_47/b4109000334640.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index+-+temp_news+%2B+analysis

    and in Propublica:

    http://www.propublica.org/site/author/abrahm_lustgarten/

  • Robert

    Natural gas may be cleaner where you burn it, but getting it to consumers creates serious ecological catastrophe.

    It’s completely disingenuous greenwash to consider “natural” gas ‘clean’.

    see:

    http://www.un-naturalgas.org/

    http://www.shaleshock.org

    and all the great reporting on this already; here in Businessweek:

    http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/08_47/b4109000334640.htm?chan=top+news_top+news+index+-+temp_news+%2B+analysis

    and in Propublica:

    http://www.propublica.org/site/author/abrahm_lustgarten/

  • http://reformautos.org/default.aspx Kenn Drescher

    Spoke to a Laclede Gas man this a.m. the St louis, MO Natural Gas Co. he said they had dual fuel trucks: Nat gas + Gasoline. Whaen gasoline was high, they were told to run on Nat Gas = 80 < 100 mile range, than switch to gasoline until able to re fill with Nat Gas. While on Nat Gas he said throttle responce was low. Low torque. Poor hill climbing + passing ability for their heavy trucks. Said very noticeable difference.

  • http://reformautos.org/default.aspx Kenn Drescher

    Spoke to a Laclede Gas man this a.m. the St louis, MO Natural Gas Co. he said they had dual fuel trucks: Nat gas + Gasoline. Whaen gasoline was high, they were told to run on Nat Gas = 80 < 100 mile range, than switch to gasoline until able to re fill with Nat Gas. While on Nat Gas he said throttle responce was low. Low torque. Poor hill climbing + passing ability for their heavy trucks. Said very noticeable difference.

  • http://reformautos.org/default.aspx Kenn Drescher

    Spoke to a Laclede Gas man this a.m. the St louis, MO Natural Gas Co. he said they had dual fuel trucks: Nat gas + Gasoline. Whaen gasoline was high, they were told to run on Nat Gas = 80 < 100 mile range, than switch to gasoline until able to re fill with Nat Gas. While on Nat Gas he said throttle responce was low. Low torque. Poor hill climbing + passing ability for their heavy trucks. Said very noticeable difference.

  • Dave

    Obama’s campaign promise was that Energy would be his #1 priority. The issue has taken a back seat. Another 4 years of false hope and broken promises.

  • Dave

    Obama’s campaign promise was that Energy would be his #1 priority. The issue has taken a back seat. Another 4 years of false hope and broken promises.

  • Dave

    Obama’s campaign promise was that Energy would be his #1 priority. The issue has taken a back seat. Another 4 years of false hope and broken promises.

  • Dave

    Obama’s campaign promise was that Energy would be his #1 priority. The issue has taken a back seat. Another 4 years of false hope and broken promises.

  • http://yahoo mahmoud samir

    my honda civic car make a strang thing when its 2 air bags had explosed when i was barking on speed not more than 3-4km/h when it hits a stone please justify me what happened and if it was a disadvantage of industry the honda company must repair it on its charg thanks alot

  • gareth minton

    I’m contributing here from the UK where gasoline prices are crazy. A gallon of gas is costing us over here $8.3 USD. I’m trying to get cars etc converted to CNG which will cut the cost of a gallon to $2.45. In addition, we need to get our air a lot cleaner as we live on a small plot of land called the UK. So, I’m up for the Pickens Plan and hope that folk will see some good sense and convert to CNG..oh and provide a kick up the butt to all the rich oil wealthy Arab states. God bless you all in America

  • gareth minton

    I’m contributing here from the UK where gasoline prices are crazy. A gallon of gas is costing us over here $8.3 USD. I’m trying to get cars etc converted to CNG which will cut the cost of a gallon to $2.45. In addition, we need to get our air a lot cleaner as we live on a small plot of land called the UK. So, I’m up for the Pickens Plan and hope that folk will see some good sense and convert to CNG..oh and provide a kick up the butt to all the rich oil wealthy Arab states. God bless you all in America

  • gareth minton

    I’m contributing here from the UK where gasoline prices are crazy. A gallon of gas is costing us over here $8.3 USD. I’m trying to get cars etc converted to CNG which will cut the cost of a gallon to $2.45. In addition, we need to get our air a lot cleaner as we live on a small plot of land called the UK. So, I’m up for the Pickens Plan and hope that folk will see some good sense and convert to CNG..oh and provide a kick up the butt to all the rich oil wealthy Arab states. God bless you all in America

  • gareth minton

    I’m contributing here from the UK where gasoline prices are crazy. A gallon of gas is costing us over here $8.3 USD. I’m trying to get cars etc converted to CNG which will cut the cost of a gallon to $2.45. In addition, we need to get our air a lot cleaner as we live on a small plot of land called the UK. So, I’m up for the Pickens Plan and hope that folk will see some good sense and convert to CNG..oh and provide a kick up the butt to all the rich oil wealthy Arab states. God bless you all in America

  • James Vaughan

    Why are auto manufacturers not making natural cars

  • James Vaughan

    Why are auto manufacturers not making natural cars

  • James Vaughan

    Why are auto manufacturers not making natural cars

  • http://Web Michael

    “Proved natural gas reserves in the US amount to about 211 trillion cubic feet. If my math is correct, without taking into account any increase in demand, the US only has about 11.5 years of natural gas left.”

    Wow, your numbers are way off. The Potential Gas Committee estimates there are 2,000 trillion cubic feet of natural gas reserves in the US. This number keeps growing as huge new supplies are found in the U.S. This number increased over 35% since 2007. We have over 100 years of gas reserves at current production rates.

  • http://Web jim

    The writer of this is WRONG on the amounts of natural gas there is in the
    USA, we have the largest deposits of natural gas in the world here. Even if we
    Were to make all cars on the road cng’s it would take around 200 years to use
    What we have. And the beauty of it all is, earth making the stuff…… faster then we
    Can burn it off.

  • http://Web miles king

    Only when we put forth the will as citizens, and demand that our government get off our backs (i.e. EPA), drill baby drill can expect any thing better!

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