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Published on March 19th, 2008 | by Clayton

69

How Biodiesel Fuel-Cells Could Power The Future (And Your Car)

biodiesel, fuel cell, microreactor, hydrogen, vegetable oil, technology, Innovatek

[social_buttons] After years of development, the Washington-based company InnovaTek is testing a hand-sized microreactor that can convert virtually any liquid fuel into hydrogen, producing a portable hydrogen stream for use in adjoining fuel-cells.

Since the microreactor units can be linked together, InnovaTek has developed systems capable of producing anywhere from 1 to 160 gallons of hydrogen per minute—enough to supply a hydrogen refueling station or, even more exciting, creating on-board hydrogen for fuel-cell powered vehicles.

That’s InnovaTek’s eventual goal anyway: having their technology built into cars, where energy-dense renewable fuels could be converted into motion, bypassing combustion and the production of exhaust gases entirely, and powering a much more efficient engine. (Imagine for a moment, filling up on biodiesel and driving off to the exhaust-free hum of an electric motor.) InnovaTek plans on commercially licensing the microreactors by 2009.

Weighing less than one pound, the square piece of shiny steel (pictured above) houses an array of microchannels containing patented catalytic sites. Each microtube helps convert (or reform) a continuous stream of hydrogen from fuels like gasoline, diesel, vegetable oil, biodiesel, propane, natural gas, even the glycerol byproduct from biodiesel manufacturing.

While hydrogen produced by the device has been lauded as the “energy of the future,” it faces major developmental issues. Hydrogen is not a great energy carrier. It has a relatively low energy density, it’s difficult and dangerous to transport, and finding a way to store it on-board in hydrogen-powered vehicles has proven difficult (the first Mercedes F-cell had a range of only 110 miles). The refueling infrastructure is also non-existent.

Even more to the point, we haven’t yet established a renewable source of energy to produce hydrogen.

But that hasn’t stopped us from building hydrogen fuel-cell powered cars. GM, Ford, Honda, Hyundai and Toyota all have prototypes in the works, and Mercedes already released their subcompact F cell in late 2007.

Taking all this into consideration, Innovatek’s reactor could revolutionize the energy and transportation infrastructure of the country.

Innovatek has already signed a $500,000 joint development agreement with Chevron to pursue fuel processing technology for hydrogen refueling stations. (If you think that’s big, in Sept. ’06 the Navy also awarded Innovatek with a $1.8 million contract to develop portable recharging systems for equipment Marines typically carry by foot.) One of Innovatek’s chief board members commented on their ability to reduce the cost of hydrogen generation: “The smaller system size, reduced catalyst volume, and more efficient process that is realized with InnovaTek’s technology represents another significant step in moving the hydrogen economy from science to commercial reality,” he said.

While InnovTtek’s reactor can run on a variety of non-renewable hydrocarbon sources they, like the potentially revolutionary Coskata Biofuels, are expressly interested in sustainable power, even to the point of preferring biodiesel in their test runs. Innovatek also said that biodiesel just plain works better: it contains fewer impurities and reforms at lower temperatures than petrodiesel.

Now let me beat naysayers to the punch here: no way are we going to power all of America’s cars on biodiesel, even using this kind of technology. I’m also interested in investigating what byproducts the microreactor produces and how they would be collected and used. But without being able to write off algae biodiesel or other majorly productive feedstocks as potential solutions, and based on the inherent coolness of this device, I think we could all be cautiously optimistic.

Related Posts:

NEW: First Algae Biodiesel Plant Goes Online April 1, 2008

GM Announces Biofuel Partnership: Cheap, Green Ethanol?

First Cellulosic Ethanol Plant Goes Online, Makes Fuel From Wood Waste

Switchgrass Could Displace 30% of US Petroleum Usage With 94% GHG Reduction

BREAKING NEWS: First Cars Run on Algae Biodiesel; Breakthrough Production Possible

A Biodiesel Prius? VW To Release 69.9 MPG Diesel Hybrid

The World’s Most Fuel Efficient Car: 285 MPG, Not A Hybrid

Sources:

InnovaTek, Inc. (see “Press Releases”)

Biodiesel Magazine (Mar. 2008): Power Without the Burn

Grainnet (Mar. 17, 08): InnovaTek Introduces New Fuel Cell Processor Technology That Favors Biodiesel

Via: Biodiesel Magazine

Photo Credit: InnovaTek



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About the Author

In a past life, Clayton was a professional blogger and editor of Gas 2.0, Important Media’s blog covering the future of sustainable transportation. He was also the Managing Editor for GO Media, the predecessor to Important Media.



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  • Space

    Why the hell did you write “exhaust-free” ?

    Does the fuel magically disappear without producing any byproduct?

    Of course not.

    but you didn’t bother finding out before writing this.

    The little scenario you wrote (about filling a car with biodiesel and having no emissions afterwards) is pure fiction.

  • Space

    Why the hell did you write “exhaust-free” ?

    Does the fuel magically disappear without producing any byproduct?

    Of course not.

    but you didn’t bother finding out before writing this.

    The little scenario you wrote (about filling a car with biodiesel and having no emissions afterwards) is pure fiction.

  • BudTheSlug

    Hey Space, the biodiesel is converted to Hydrogen, which can be used by fuel cells for power with only H2O as the byproduct.

    • Shafraz

      Biodiesel is a Hydrocarbon they has C,H . then what will happened to C?

  • BudTheSlug

    Hey Space, the biodiesel is converted to Hydrogen, which can be used by fuel cells for power with only H2O as the byproduct.

  • Bob Johnson

    vaporware literally

  • Bob Johnson

    vaporware literally

  • Patrick

    There are only two things you can do to reduce emissions:

    1. Move into the building where you work;

    2. Don’t have children.

    Everything else is useless. Unfortunately #1 is illegal due to zoning regulations, and #2 requires both a certain pessimistic outlook and the ability to keep your pants on.

  • Patrick

    There are only two things you can do to reduce emissions:

    1. Move into the building where you work;

    2. Don’t have children.

    Everything else is useless. Unfortunately #1 is illegal due to zoning regulations, and #2 requires both a certain pessimistic outlook and the ability to keep your pants on.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Space,

    The reason I wrote “exhaust-free” is because converting liquid fuels into hydrogen and then converting the hydrogen to usable electrical energy in a fuel-cell requires no combustion, meaning there will be no exhaust gases, just the production of water (see Wikipedia for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_vehicle).

    Of course, some byproducts of the conversion will be produced, and (as I mentioned in the article) it isn’t clear what those are or how they will be disposed of.

    Additionally, it’s important to qualify that the production of biodiesel produces emissions. But whatever fuel you decide to use in this microreactor, it still bypasses producing normal combustion products – at least at the tailpipe.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Space,

    The reason I wrote “exhaust-free” is because converting liquid fuels into hydrogen and then converting the hydrogen to usable electrical energy in a fuel-cell requires no combustion, meaning there will be no exhaust gases, just the production of water (see Wikipedia for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_vehicle).

    Of course, some byproducts of the conversion will be produced, and (as I mentioned in the article) it isn’t clear what those are or how they will be disposed of.

    Additionally, it’s important to qualify that the production of biodiesel produces emissions. But whatever fuel you decide to use in this microreactor, it still bypasses producing normal combustion products – at least at the tailpipe.

  • Nebs

    Are we still talking about fuel cell cars? Isn’t it time we move on? It’s so 1990’s Ballard hype.

  • Nebs

    Are we still talking about fuel cell cars? Isn’t it time we move on? It’s so 1990’s Ballard hype.

  • Alex

    Doesn’t this require external energy. My understanding is that the biofuels will not break down, unless a new reaction has been discovered, unless the biofuel is heated. If no external power is required, then this is promising.

  • Alex

    Doesn’t this require external energy. My understanding is that the biofuels will not break down, unless a new reaction has been discovered, unless the biofuel is heated. If no external power is required, then this is promising.

  • mcfly

    “Hey Space, the biodiesel is converted to Hydrogen, which can be used by fuel cells for power with only H2O as the byproduct.”

    actualy, biodiesel, or any other type of carbon based fuel, contains oxygen, hydrogen, but also carbon and nitrogen.

    Now, as in physics you can’t make something juste disappear, that carbon and nitrogen must go somewhere, therefore, you don’t have H2O as byproduct only… you also produce stuff like CO2 and such… and as hydrogen carries less energy than any type of oil, you’ll have to burn more of it to get the same performance, thus: you’ll certainly mollute more (if you can prove me otherwise, I’ll be glad to read about it… ;) )

  • mcfly

    “Hey Space, the biodiesel is converted to Hydrogen, which can be used by fuel cells for power with only H2O as the byproduct.”

    actualy, biodiesel, or any other type of carbon based fuel, contains oxygen, hydrogen, but also carbon and nitrogen.

    Now, as in physics you can’t make something juste disappear, that carbon and nitrogen must go somewhere, therefore, you don’t have H2O as byproduct only… you also produce stuff like CO2 and such… and as hydrogen carries less energy than any type of oil, you’ll have to burn more of it to get the same performance, thus: you’ll certainly mollute more (if you can prove me otherwise, I’ll be glad to read about it… ;) )

  • outlook

    Biodiesel will never be the answer. Look what happened to ethanol. For one the energy equation did not work. Ultimately to generate energy we are looking to trade one commodity for another albeit with less emissions but anything that cannot be adopted widely won’t work. The answer is not in the energy generation but in the energy storage. Battery technology and energy storage will undoubtedly be the answer for cars. The question is what method will be used to generate the additional energy for these batteries and will that be environmentally friendly. Look to increased efficiency of wind, solar, geothermal, and dare I say it, something new.

  • outlook

    Biodiesel will never be the answer. Look what happened to ethanol. For one the energy equation did not work. Ultimately to generate energy we are looking to trade one commodity for another albeit with less emissions but anything that cannot be adopted widely won’t work. The answer is not in the energy generation but in the energy storage. Battery technology and energy storage will undoubtedly be the answer for cars. The question is what method will be used to generate the additional energy for these batteries and will that be environmentally friendly. Look to increased efficiency of wind, solar, geothermal, and dare I say it, something new.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    For readers who think biofuels are useless, take a look at these stories (and then come back and commment). None of these biofuels are made from food:

    Switchgrass Could Displace 30% of US Petroleum Usage With 94% GHG Reduction (http://gas2.org/2008/03/14/switchgrass-could-displace-30-of-us-petroleum-usage-with-94-ghg-reduction/)

    First Cellulosic Ethanol Plant Goes Online, Makes Fuel From Wood Waste (http://gas2.org/2008/03/07/first-cellulosic-ethanol-plant-goes-online-makes-fuel-from-wood-waste/)

    BREAKING NEWS: First Cars Run on Algae Biodiesel; Breakthrough Production Possible (http://gas2.org/2008/01/21/breaking-news-first-cars-run-on-algae-biodiesel-breakthrough-production-possible/)

    GM Announces Biofuel Partnership: Cheap, Green Ethanol? (http://gas2.org/2008/01/13/gm-announces-biofuel-partnership-cheap-green-ethanol/)

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    For readers who think biofuels are useless, take a look at these stories (and then come back and commment). None of these biofuels are made from food:

    Switchgrass Could Displace 30% of US Petroleum Usage With 94% GHG Reduction (http://gas2.org/2008/03/14/switchgrass-could-displace-30-of-us-petroleum-usage-with-94-ghg-reduction/)

    First Cellulosic Ethanol Plant Goes Online, Makes Fuel From Wood Waste (http://gas2.org/2008/03/07/first-cellulosic-ethanol-plant-goes-online-makes-fuel-from-wood-waste/)

    BREAKING NEWS: First Cars Run on Algae Biodiesel; Breakthrough Production Possible (http://gas2.org/2008/01/21/breaking-news-first-cars-run-on-algae-biodiesel-breakthrough-production-possible/)

    GM Announces Biofuel Partnership: Cheap, Green Ethanol? (http://gas2.org/2008/01/13/gm-announces-biofuel-partnership-cheap-green-ethanol/)

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Outlook,

    “. The question is what method will be used to generate the additional energy for these batteries and will that be environmentally friendly.”

    That’s exactly what this technology provides, another way to make electricity from renewable sources.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Outlook,

    “. The question is what method will be used to generate the additional energy for these batteries and will that be environmentally friendly.”

    That’s exactly what this technology provides, another way to make electricity from renewable sources.

  • Cambridge

    To Patrick

    “2. Don’t have children”

    The persons that bring new solution to old problems where once children. Please, keep this discussion free from ideology!

  • Cambridge

    To Patrick

    “2. Don’t have children”

    The persons that bring new solution to old problems where once children. Please, keep this discussion free from ideology!

  • outlook

    I don’t disagree that this technology offers promise and can have a positive impact but on what scale. It is a

    way to make electricity from renewable sources and waste but will never satisfactorily address current and future energy demands. Does that mean we don’t pursue alternatives? Of course not. In fact their pursuit and implementation are inevitable as long as they become commercially viable? That means someone saves or makes money.

  • outlook

    I don’t disagree that this technology offers promise and can have a positive impact but on what scale. It is a

    way to make electricity from renewable sources and waste but will never satisfactorily address current and future energy demands. Does that mean we don’t pursue alternatives? Of course not. In fact their pursuit and implementation are inevitable as long as they become commercially viable? That means someone saves or makes money.

  • Asham

    Reforming produces hydrogen and carbon monoxide. You can’t emit carbon monoxide willy-nilly as it is toxic; converting CO to CO2 is one of the jobs of your catalytic converter. So, people don’t like CO2, and CO is toxic, so it is flat out wrong to call this solution “exhaust free.”

  • Asham

    Reforming produces hydrogen and carbon monoxide. You can’t emit carbon monoxide willy-nilly as it is toxic; converting CO to CO2 is one of the jobs of your catalytic converter. So, people don’t like CO2, and CO is toxic, so it is flat out wrong to call this solution “exhaust free.”

  • Strat

    It’s highly likely that both advances in microfluidics and advances in nanoparticle catalysts will find use in reformer and fuel cell technology.

    The items often ignored by the many breathless articles about “direct to hydrogen” fuel cell technologies is the fact that reformers and many fuel cell technologies (Especially proton-exchange membranes) are highly intolerant of contaminants. The other is that the “balance of plant” components for fuel cell systems often make them too large or too intolerance of vibration, etc, for use in motor vehicle applications.

    In order to prepare feedstocks for use in many of these systems, the feedstocks would have to be through purification steps that either use enough energy to make the net energy density uneconomical or that don’t scale to mass production very well, and in almost every case, wouldn’t be practical in a home or in-car application.

  • Strat

    It’s highly likely that both advances in microfluidics and advances in nanoparticle catalysts will find use in reformer and fuel cell technology.

    The items often ignored by the many breathless articles about “direct to hydrogen” fuel cell technologies is the fact that reformers and many fuel cell technologies (Especially proton-exchange membranes) are highly intolerant of contaminants. The other is that the “balance of plant” components for fuel cell systems often make them too large or too intolerance of vibration, etc, for use in motor vehicle applications.

    In order to prepare feedstocks for use in many of these systems, the feedstocks would have to be through purification steps that either use enough energy to make the net energy density uneconomical or that don’t scale to mass production very well, and in almost every case, wouldn’t be practical in a home or in-car application.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Strat,

    If you look at the source articles (the press releases on InnovaTek’s website), you’ll find that they have already tested the fuel cells on 100% biodiesel with success. They said they actually preferred biodiesel because it contains fewer contaminants than petroleum diesel.

    They’re also testing other technology to remove contaminants from the pre-fuel-cell fuel stream.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Strat,

    If you look at the source articles (the press releases on InnovaTek’s website), you’ll find that they have already tested the fuel cells on 100% biodiesel with success. They said they actually preferred biodiesel because it contains fewer contaminants than petroleum diesel.

    They’re also testing other technology to remove contaminants from the pre-fuel-cell fuel stream.

  • Steve

    Why are you not using water as the base fuel instead of bio deisel?

  • Steve

    Why are you not using water as the base fuel instead of bio deisel?

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Steve,

    The whole point is that energy is required to make hydrogen. In this case, the energy comes from biodiesel, a renewable resource. There is no energy in water. It takes an energy input to split water and make hydrogen, which some people think should come from nuclear power.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Steve,

    The whole point is that energy is required to make hydrogen. In this case, the energy comes from biodiesel, a renewable resource. There is no energy in water. It takes an energy input to split water and make hydrogen, which some people think should come from nuclear power.

  • http://www.h2andyou.org Rex

    InnovaTek’s technology takes advantage of hydrogen’s versatility by processing many forms of different liquids and fuels to produce hydrogen, and could drastically affect the way hydrogen is deployed in the future. We at the Hydrogen Education Foundation are excited by this development, as it supports our goal of helping people understand the promise of hydrogen as part of our clean, sustainable energy future.

    One of the key benefits for adopting hydrogen is that it truly is a universal fuel that can be produced using virtually any form of energy including wind, solar and nuclear. In fact, Iceland is currently producing hydrogen using geothermal energy by utilizing the earth’s natural heat to split water and produce hydrogen fuel and plans to have the world’s first “hydrogen economy.”

    Although this article suggests that a hydrogen infrastructure faces many overwhelming hurdles, let’s keep in mind that true breakthroughs are never easy to envision. Let’s not forget that hydrogen has been used for decades by other industries, such as agriculture, oil production and even food processing (ever heard of the term “hydrogenated?” – take a look at a jar of peanut butter or the wrapper of a Starburst). More than 40 billion kg of hydrogen are produced globally each year with production plants located near or within every major metropolitan city in the US – enough to fuel 130 million fuel cell-electric vehicles annually. Since hydrogen is used to produce gasoline, switching from gas to hydrogen to fuel our transportation is achievable.

    To learn more about the benefits of hydrogen, please visit http://www.h2andyou.org. In addition, the Hydrogen Expo and Conference, March 30 – April 3, is taking place in Sacramento, CA. If you live near or if you’re traveling to Sacramento, we invite you to join us and experience how hydrogen can have a positive impact on our lives. For more information about the Expo, please visit hydrogenconference.org.

  • http://www.h2andyou.org Rex

    InnovaTek’s technology takes advantage of hydrogen’s versatility by processing many forms of different liquids and fuels to produce hydrogen, and could drastically affect the way hydrogen is deployed in the future. We at the Hydrogen Education Foundation are excited by this development, as it supports our goal of helping people understand the promise of hydrogen as part of our clean, sustainable energy future.

    One of the key benefits for adopting hydrogen is that it truly is a universal fuel that can be produced using virtually any form of energy including wind, solar and nuclear. In fact, Iceland is currently producing hydrogen using geothermal energy by utilizing the earth’s natural heat to split water and produce hydrogen fuel and plans to have the world’s first “hydrogen economy.”

    Although this article suggests that a hydrogen infrastructure faces many overwhelming hurdles, let’s keep in mind that true breakthroughs are never easy to envision. Let’s not forget that hydrogen has been used for decades by other industries, such as agriculture, oil production and even food processing (ever heard of the term “hydrogenated?” – take a look at a jar of peanut butter or the wrapper of a Starburst). More than 40 billion kg of hydrogen are produced globally each year with production plants located near or within every major metropolitan city in the US – enough to fuel 130 million fuel cell-electric vehicles annually. Since hydrogen is used to produce gasoline, switching from gas to hydrogen to fuel our transportation is achievable.

    To learn more about the benefits of hydrogen, please visit http://www.h2andyou.org. In addition, the Hydrogen Expo and Conference, March 30 – April 3, is taking place in Sacramento, CA. If you live near or if you’re traveling to Sacramento, we invite you to join us and experience how hydrogen can have a positive impact on our lives. For more information about the Expo, please visit hydrogenconference.org.

  • http://blog.innovators-network.org Anthony Kuhn

    Clayton:

    Great coverage of a fantastic innovation that could very well help to solve a few of the on-going global problems with energy needs and the pollution generated by burning cheap, dirty fuel. I linked to your Gas2.0 piece in my blog for the Innovators-Network, as this type of product is a model worthy of imitation.

  • http://blog.innovators-network.org Anthony Kuhn

    Clayton:

    Great coverage of a fantastic innovation that could very well help to solve a few of the on-going global problems with energy needs and the pollution generated by burning cheap, dirty fuel. I linked to your Gas2.0 piece in my blog for the Innovators-Network, as this type of product is a model worthy of imitation.

  • http://www.foresight.com Foresight

    Sounds too much like perpetual motion. Anyway on the surface the energy equation just points to new technology, not better technology. :)

  • http://www.foresight.com Foresight

    Sounds too much like perpetual motion. Anyway on the surface the energy equation just points to new technology, not better technology. :)

  • gert

    electrolosys of fuel, nothing new

  • gert

    electrolosys of fuel, nothing new

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  • http://www.thewif.org.uk david hill

    Biofuels (and carbon capture) are a ‘catastrophe’ for future humankind

    The decisions being taken by governments around the world in the quest for sustainability are a catastrophe for humankind in the long-term. Two of these decisions at the forefront of news are biofuels, and carbon capture and storage.

    Biofuels — the fuel revolution that will supposedly help us:

    (1) Growing crops in the United States for biofuels requires around the same energy input for fertilisers and processing the crops as that saved by replacing petrol on the forecourt (Biofuels – A solution worse than the problem, Daily Telegraph).

    (2) By harvesting the peat bogs for biofuels, we release 30 times more carbon dioxide than will be recouped by burning the biofuel produced (Prof. Jack Riley, University of Nottingham).

    (3) Growing biofuels takes a lot of land and huge amounts of water — neither of which the world has to spare.

    (4) China and India risk famine if they proceed with their biofuels plans, because they don’t have enough water to grow both fuel and food (International Water Management Institute).

    (5) Biofuels are killing forests and leading to more global warming, besides taking land away from food crops (Global Forest Coalition).

    (6) The diversion of land meant for food crops to agrofuel production is a “crime against humanity” (Jean Ziegler, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food).

    Carbon Capture — putting off today what others will have to solve tomorrow:

    (1) Carbon sequestration and storage (under our oceans and land) is an untried method of locking up carbon dioxide forever, but there is not a 100 per cent assurance that it will not escape. Possible escape routes include earthquakes, land shifts, terrorism (holding the world to ransom) or human disasters/accidents.

    (2) Sequestration and storage of carbon dioxide is not a solution, but a problem that humankind will have to face in the future — one that might eventually threaten the existence of human life itself on Earth, for nothing ever designed has lasted forever.

    (3) Governments, as usual, are only looking at solving problems today without any understanding of what this will bring in the future. They are attempting to lock up gases that are toxic to humans — leaving any problems for future generations to solve.

    (4) If there was a rupture in the storage vessel, the ramifications for the world would be immense, to say the very least. Therefore, carbon capture is a method of putting off today what others will have to fix tomorrow (if they can).

    Dr David Hill

    World Innovation Foundation Charity

    Bern, Switzerland

  • http://www.thewif.org.uk david hill

    Biofuels (and carbon capture) are a ‘catastrophe’ for future humankind

    The decisions being taken by governments around the world in the quest for sustainability are a catastrophe for humankind in the long-term. Two of these decisions at the forefront of news are biofuels, and carbon capture and storage.

    Biofuels — the fuel revolution that will supposedly help us:

    (1) Growing crops in the United States for biofuels requires around the same energy input for fertilisers and processing the crops as that saved by replacing petrol on the forecourt (Biofuels – A solution worse than the problem, Daily Telegraph).

    (2) By harvesting the peat bogs for biofuels, we release 30 times more carbon dioxide than will be recouped by burning the biofuel produced (Prof. Jack Riley, University of Nottingham).

    (3) Growing biofuels takes a lot of land and huge amounts of water — neither of which the world has to spare.

    (4) China and India risk famine if they proceed with their biofuels plans, because they don’t have enough water to grow both fuel and food (International Water Management Institute).

    (5) Biofuels are killing forests and leading to more global warming, besides taking land away from food crops (Global Forest Coalition).

    (6) The diversion of land meant for food crops to agrofuel production is a “crime against humanity” (Jean Ziegler, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food).

    Carbon Capture — putting off today what others will have to solve tomorrow:

    (1) Carbon sequestration and storage (under our oceans and land) is an untried method of locking up carbon dioxide forever, but there is not a 100 per cent assurance that it will not escape. Possible escape routes include earthquakes, land shifts, terrorism (holding the world to ransom) or human disasters/accidents.

    (2) Sequestration and storage of carbon dioxide is not a solution, but a problem that humankind will have to face in the future — one that might eventually threaten the existence of human life itself on Earth, for nothing ever designed has lasted forever.

    (3) Governments, as usual, are only looking at solving problems today without any understanding of what this will bring in the future. They are attempting to lock up gases that are toxic to humans — leaving any problems for future generations to solve.

    (4) If there was a rupture in the storage vessel, the ramifications for the world would be immense, to say the very least. Therefore, carbon capture is a method of putting off today what others will have to fix tomorrow (if they can).

    Dr David Hill

    World Innovation Foundation Charity

    Bern, Switzerland

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Everyone please take a look at the latest algae biodiesel announcement. PetroSun says they’ll be producing 4.4 million gallons of algal oil per year starting April 1, 2008: http://gas2.org/2008/03/29/first-algae-biodiesel-plant-goes-online-april-1-2008/

    That’s a totally non-food based source of fuel.

  • http://gas2.org Clayton B. Cornell

    Everyone please take a look at the latest algae biodiesel announcement. PetroSun says they’ll be producing 4.4 million gallons of algal oil per year starting April 1, 2008: http://gas2.org/2008/03/29/first-algae-biodiesel-plant-goes-online-april-1-2008/

    That’s a totally non-food based source of fuel.

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  • http://www.alleventsgroup.com Catherine Jalandoni

    We will be conducting a major conference on CNG-NGV and Green IT. We are looking for local and International marketing partners for this endeavor. Please provide me with an email address where I can forward more information for your review. Thank you.

  • http://www.alleventsgroup.com Catherine Jalandoni

    We will be conducting a major conference on CNG-NGV and Green IT. We are looking for local and International marketing partners for this endeavor. Please provide me with an email address where I can forward more information for your review. Thank you.

  • http://NA kapil bansal

    hey space,

    some how the entire logic of hydrogen powered vehicles seems quaint to me. It may be OK in city centers and other densely populated areas.. else.. the whole thing sounds bad in energy equation

    Even algal hydrogen for that matter. You would end up using only a very small portion of the bio mass as hydrogen.. and, at the same time.. spend energy(money) doing so. the carbonaceous matter being wasted.. and polluting.

    Better solutions can be worked out.

    shall love to be part of such endeavours… do getin touch.. kumarfurnace@hotmail.com

  • Mr.Jeffro

    Space,

    This writing states:

    Innovatek has already signed a $500,000 joint development agreement with Chevron to pursue fuel processing technology for hydrogen refueling stations.

    Is it not funny to see Chevron jumping on this band wagon. These oil companies want to control the energy throughout the world and companies like Innovatek continue to receive monies for a “share” of the business. Oil companies should not be able to get involved with these technologies. They have already created there vast dynasties by taking advantage of the people throughout the world. Alternative fuels is where the world needs to focus and forget about the filthy rich oil companies.

    Regards,

    Jeff

  • Mr.Jeffro

    Space,

    This writing states:

    Innovatek has already signed a $500,000 joint development agreement with Chevron to pursue fuel processing technology for hydrogen refueling stations.

    Is it not funny to see Chevron jumping on this band wagon. These oil companies want to control the energy throughout the world and companies like Innovatek continue to receive monies for a “share” of the business. Oil companies should not be able to get involved with these technologies. They have already created there vast dynasties by taking advantage of the people throughout the world. Alternative fuels is where the world needs to focus and forget about the filthy rich oil companies.

    Regards,

    Jeff

  • Cyrus Aminzar

    I think it is a good idea that this hear and there inventions try toget together and make sense and give a practical and real time birth to a new energy source.

  • Cyrus Aminzar

    I think it is a good idea that this hear and there inventions try toget together and make sense and give a practical and real time birth to a new energy source.

  • Pingback: Biodiesel’s New Approval Rating Could Ease Warranty Concerns : Gas 2.0()

  • http://www.inform-me2.com C. Greene

    This one at Innova Tek may be vaporware but there are some “on-board” hydrogen production systems that are working in cars today. The top ones are compared at inform-me2.com. People are saving 50-100% on their mileage using these readily-available approaches. Who knew?

  • http://www.inform-me2.com C. Greene

    This one at Innova Tek may be vaporware but there are some “on-board” hydrogen production systems that are working in cars today. The top ones are compared at inform-me2.com. People are saving 50-100% on their mileage using these readily-available approaches. Who knew?

  • Abhay Joshi

    What is the reason that Ethanol & Methanol aren’t used as fuels ? These solvents can be used as cheapest fuels for cars, maybe, they may produce more pollution, however, we can work on how can we control pollution.

    Biodiesel is a very good option, there is a huge part of the world which is waste land, where we can produce alge. Is it the fear of America that if bio-diesel is popular, what will happen to the US economy in future ? All the calculations would go wrong if bio-diesel is popular.

    Let us work together for our world now. If only certain part of the world keeps on growing, it will be an imbalance to everyone and a day will come, everything will stop.

    I would suggest to the western countries, just think in a positive way and look for the growth of our world.

  • Abhay Joshi

    What is the reason that Ethanol & Methanol aren’t used as fuels ? These solvents can be used as cheapest fuels for cars, maybe, they may produce more pollution, however, we can work on how can we control pollution.

    Biodiesel is a very good option, there is a huge part of the world which is waste land, where we can produce alge. Is it the fear of America that if bio-diesel is popular, what will happen to the US economy in future ? All the calculations would go wrong if bio-diesel is popular.

    Let us work together for our world now. If only certain part of the world keeps on growing, it will be an imbalance to everyone and a day will come, everything will stop.

    I would suggest to the western countries, just think in a positive way and look for the growth of our world.

  • Pingback: Biodiesel Mythbuster 2.0: Twenty-Two Biodiesel Myths Dispelled : Gas 2.0()

  • Pingback: Other Green Hybrid EV Configurations Using Existing and Developing Technologies()

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  • Pingback: the wcs vehicles music » Is Biodiesel Power With Vegetable Oil The Means By Which Your Motor Vehicle Will Power Itself In The Future?()

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